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Ratification at Woodgreen: Another victory for Workers United

Image: Workers United Poster

After two weeks on strike, Woodgreen Community Services workers voted 81% in favour of of accepting a new collective agreement.

Founded by the social services arm of the United Church, Woodgreen has been providing social services in east end Toronto for over 70 years and now has over 600 workers in Toronto, most of whom work in Early Childhood Education. Their multi-lingual mostly-female workforce voted to unionize in 2004, joining Workers United Local 154.

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Lockout ends but pension troubles continue for Saskatoon transit workers

Photo: Amalgamated Transit Union

330 transit workers returned to work on Monday, after a month-long lock out by their employer, the City of Saskatoon. 

The City announced on Saturday that it would rescind its second lock out order after the City Council vetoed the order. The first lock out order was issued to the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 615, deemed illegal by the Saskatchewan Labour Board on September 20th. 

The lock out was issued after the union refused to make concessions on their pension plan that would have meant major reductions in benefits for future transit workers. Other unions have been forced to accept concessions by the City, but the Amalgamated Transit Union is one of the last holdouts against a two-tiered pension plan.

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Strike notice served on St. Lawrence Seaway

Photo: flickr/Ceedub 13

Five Unifor locals representing workers along the St. Lawrence Seaway served a 72 hour strike notice today. 

Strike notice was served when the two sides met today in Cornwall, Ontario, returning to the table for the first time in several months. 

Staffing levels were a key issue at the bargaining table, as the Seaway moves to hands-free mooring, hoping to eliminate the staff currently working on the locks. 

In April 2014, the Seaway announced its plan to automate the locks, with funding from the federal government. Work has already begun to retrofit locks with the new system, with the goal of having all locks hands-free by 2018.

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rabble radio

Episode 159: Jobs, jobs, jobs ... or lack thereof

October 27, 2014
| Unifor, Canada's largest private sector union, hosted a conference called The Good Jobs Summit on October 3-6, 2014. Here are some highlights.
Length: 34:30 minutes (31.59 MB)

Ontario municipal elections: Labour endorsements ahoy!

Photo: flickr/Jaimie McCaffrey
Not sure which candidates are the most labour-friendly? Never fear, Ella Bedard has created a handy list of endorsements by labour unions. Happy voting everyone!

Related rabble.ca story:

Photo: Ella Bedard
| October 24, 2014

Labour endorsements in Ontario's municipal elections

Photo: flickr/Jaimie McCaffrey

With less than four days to go until Ontario's municipal elections, undecided voters may be looking for guidance. Several unions and labour organizations are supporting mayoral, city council, and school district candidates.

Some Labour District Councils have also published lists of endorsements, highlighting candidates who support environmental and economic sustainability, local economic stimulus, better social services, and workers' rights. Endorsements often entail more than just a seal of approval. In many cases, unions or area labour councils will donate time, and staff to their preferred candidates.

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Fair Employment Week / la Semaine de l’équité d’emploi

Monday, October 27, 2014 - 7:00am - Friday, October 31, 2014 - 8:00pm

Location

Campuses across Canada Ottawa
Canada
45° 25' 17.508" N, 75° 41' 49.8948" W

Each year, CAUT and its member associations join with a coalition of unions and activists across North America to organize a week-long series of events for Fair Employment Week (FEW). These events aim to raise awareness about the overuse and exploitation of Contract Academic Staff. We encourage all workers at universities and colleges, students and supporters to participate in these events and take action.

http://www.fairemploymentweek.ca/events-2/

What are Community Benefit Agreements?

Photo: flickr/Bill Jacobus

You may have heard a lot about them lately: Olivia Chow has made them the central plank of her youth employment platform, Premier Kathleen Wynne has been celebrating them, and the term was bounced around at the Unifor-led Good Jobs Summit. But what is a Community Benefit Agreement?

Community Benefit Agreements (or CBA’s) are contracts which leverage a development project to meet a broader range of policy objectives such as equity, poverty reduction, environmental sustainability and local economic development.

In their most common form, CBA’s are tacked on to publicly funded infrastructure projects to ensure that the communities affected by the development receive more social and economic value from the project.

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UP! How the NL government and its unions solved their pension problem

image: rabble.ca

In a country characterized by increasingly confrontational labour relations, an unlikely story of cooperation and negotiation emerges. Are there lessons for the rest of the country?

It took two years of wrangling -- and over a decade to get to the wrangling stage -- but on September 2, 2014, the government of Newfoundland and Labrador announced that it had reached an agreement on pension reform with five of its employees' labour unions.

In an era of increasingly hostile labour relations, the NL government and its unions managed to negotiate an agreement. Unions now have equal say in the new corporation that is to be established to administer the revised plan.

Factors for success

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