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Solidarity in Guelph: Workers hold the line at NGF Canada strike

Photo:  Susan Taylor

For a second day in a row, striking workers and their supporters at the NGF Canada plant in Guelph have succeeded in blocking replacement workers from crossing the picket line.

The 28 members of Workers United Local 2641 have been out on strike since September 30 after failing to reach an agreement with their employer, Japanese-owned NGF Canada.

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Study affirms union statements: Overcrowding creates danger in Saskatchewan prisons

Photo: flickr/Mark Turn

For years, the Saskatchewan General and Governmental Employees Union (SGEU) has been arguing that the provinces prisons are overcrowded. Now a study into the human effects of prison overcrowding is backing up that assertion.

The study, Warehousing Prisoners in Saskatchewan, was authored by Jason Demers for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. It found that Saskatchewan's prisons currently house twice as many prisoners as they were designed to hold.

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Reports paint grim picture of youth unemployment in Canada

Photo: flickr/Jamie McCaffrey
"Its a pretty scary time for young workers right now." According to new reports, that thought could be an understatement.

Related rabble.ca story:

Vital Signs Reports paint a stark picture of youth unemployment across Canada

Photo: flickr/Jamie McCaffrey

Stability is not in the cards for Canadian workers, with young workers particularly affected, according to this year's Vital Signs Reports from the Community Foundations of Canada.

The first Vital Signs was produced by the Toronto Community Foundation in 2001. It assembled local research and national data to paint a broad strokes picture of community health. Since its inception the Vitals project has expanded to include a total of 49 Canadian communities big and small, who have produced reports or are acting on findings from previous reports.

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One year in: Jerry Dias on Unifor's first year and its future

Photo: twitter/@ptbolabour

It's been just over a year since the formation of Unifor on Labour Day of 2013. Last weekend, the union held the Good Jobs Summit, where the Unifor's first president, Jerry Dias, spoke several times about the importance of reaching out to all sectors to keep and create more good jobs. 

Speakers at the summit came from the realms of business and politics. They included prominent Liberal politicians like Wynne and Justin Trudeau, leading some to speculate that Unifor might be breaking their traditional ties with the NDP. But Dias says no.

"I am going to think about the labour movement first," he explained.

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The Good Jobs Summit - the audio round up

The Good Job Summit took place in Toronto October 3rd to 5th. rabble's live blogged and and provided audio coverage of the historic week-end, organized by Unifor. See the live blog here

Missed the event? Here is the audio round-up. Listen in:

 

 

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Needs No Introduction

Good Jobs Summit: The Good Jobs Debate!

October 7, 2014
| Over the next few weeks, we'll be posting some of the many discussions which took place at the Good Jobs Summit. We begin with the Good Jobs Debate on Friday, October 3, 2014.
Length: 1:08:49 minutes (126.02 MB)

Chow, Wynne, in favour of community benefit agreements

Photo: flickr/Olivia Chow

Toronto mayoral candidate Olivia Chow tweeted that she and Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne are in agreement on transit, after the Premier's speech at the Good Jobs Summit.

On Oct 4, Wynne addressed the delegates at the summit, a combination conference and convention organized by private sector union Unifor in the hopes of jumpstarting a cross-sectorial discussion about how to ensure there are better jobs available for Canadians in the future.

Wynne spoke at length about the importance of infrastructure projects, like the Eglinton Crosstown LRT line in Toronto, in job creation, noting that along the 19km line are five priority neighbourhoods that have historically low-income and disadvantaged residents.

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What does it mean to have a 'good job' in Canada today?

Photo: rabble.ca

At the Good Jobs Summit in Toronto, about 1,000 people from across the country gathered over the weekend to examine that question, hear expert commentary and contribute to the dialogue around the employment challenges affecting millions in our country. They also set forth possible solutions toward establishing a more just society with greater job opportunities for all.

In the spirit of that dialogue, rabble asked a diverse group of five people about the issues raised at the summit and what they meant to them. Here's what they took away from the three-day gathering.

Amanda Cope, fourth year student majoring in Political Science and Labour Studies at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario:

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Prince Edward Islanders ask cruise passengers to help fight EI cuts

Photo: flickr/Martin Cathrae

CHARLOTTETOWN  – The PEI Coalition for Fair EI is asking tourists to support Island workers in their fight to defend Canada's Employment Insurance Program.

Since 2011, Conservative Government changes have reduced Island workers' access to Canada's Employment Insurance program.

Most notably, the January 2013 overhaul of the program penalizes repeat claimants and requires workers to look for and accept lower paying work further from home. Many feel these changes are putting pressure on Prince Edward Islanders to leave the Island in search of work.

Today, members of the Coalition will greet passengers of the Princess Ruby -- a cruise ship carrying 3000 travellers -- as they re-board the ship after spending a day touring the Island.

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