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| December 8, 2014

The world's first harm-reduction workers' union comes to Toronto

Photo: flickr/Todd Huffman
This new union, THRWU, takes an inclusive approach to organizing some of health care's most precarious workers.

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Toronto is now home to world's first harm-reduction workers' union

Image: THRWU

Toronto is home to the world's first ever harm-reduction workers' union: THRWU.

On November 11, workers at South Riverdale and Central Toronto Community health centres told their employers that they had joined the Toronto Harm Reduction Workers Union (THRWU) and demanded recognition.

With 50 members and counting, the union represents a wide range of professions including HIV/AIDS workers, workers involved in the distribution of safe usage tools, overdose prevention workers, peer workers, Hepatitis C workers, and nurses -- to name only a few.

While some THRWU members work in paid positions, others work as volunteers or are unemployed. 

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CLC program aims to build social justice and activist leadership

Photo: flickr/ewe neon

A new leadership program educating young workers in movement building and organizing just wrapped up its first session.

Developed by the Canadian Labour Congress, Taking Charge of Change is a project spearheaded by the CLC's Young Workers Department and Educational Department, delivered via online webinar, to advance social justice and activist leadership training.

The project's aim was to build leadership and organizing skills amongst a diverse cohort of Canadian youth. 

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Sex worker allies decry C-36 on the eve of its implementation

Photo: Flickr/Wayne MacPhail

Sex workers and their allies from the feminist and labour movements have taken to social media today to decry the December 6 implementation of Bill C-36, which they say will only increase the risks associated with sex work.

December 6 commemorates the Ecole Polytechnique Massacre, in which 14 women were separated from their male classmates, then shot and killed. In the 25 years since those shootings, December 6 has become a national day to acknowledge all female victims of violence.

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Image: Facebook/BCFed
| November 28, 2014

UberX speeds taxi drivers toward precarious work

Photo: flickr/Ashtonpal

The ride-sharing app Uber has received a lot of press in recent weeks, most of it bad.

Thousands of smartphone users took photos of themselves deleting the Uber application from their phone, after Senior Executive Emil Michaels suggested that the company spend a million dollars to smear journalists who have criticized Uber.

Much of the controversy around Uber stems from its attempt to import an operational model that works best for online exchanges into the real world. In the "fine print" on their website, Uber claims that it "is not a transportation provider."

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UP! Precarious existence to organized resistance: I was a temp agency worker at Rogers

Image: rabble.ca

These days, whenever I enter a home I notice things I never did before. What once sat invisibly next to the television sets and computers, has become intimately familiar and immediately recognizable.

You see, for the past three months I worked as a temp agency worker at a Rogers Cable warehouse in Toronto, one of the largest in Canada, with a distribution network throughout Eastern Canada. For eight-to-twelve hours a day my coworkers and I sorted, tested, cleaned, and packaged television/PVR boxes and modems for distribution.

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Asia Pacific Currents

Workers in Turkey fighting on many fronts

November 21, 2014
| Labour news from Cambodia, Thailand, South Korea, Australia and Bangladesh. Interview on the issues facing workers in Turkey and the war in Syria and Iraq.
Length: 28:57 minutes (13.26 MB)

How to shift culture and reduce workplace harassment

Photo: flickr/Loozrboy
Creating a workplace culture to reduce harassment is not easy but some organizations are tackling the problem.

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