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Ethical Waters: Healing Walk in the tar sands grows year by year

The 2012 Tar Sands Healing Walk. (Photo: Jesse Cardinal)

In the face of enormous destruction and intimidation, it is crucial to assert what one values, and why. The third annual Tar Sands Healing Walk met this challenge head on with courage and wisdom, as Indigenous communities asserted that it is a human responsibility to protect clean and healthy water, air and land for future generations.

Walking together on August 4 through the 14-km epicenter of the Alberta tar sands, roughly 250 people witnessed the immense industrial devastation and conducted ceremonies for the healing of the land and waters.

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Toplessness as tactic: Quebec students renew debate over nude protest

(Photo: ricardoara / flickr)

Montreal's student protesters have put down their signs and are taking something of a break until classes resume in August. Meanwhile, there is time to examine the movement against tuition hikes and the methods it used to draw local and international support.

One of the most attention-grabbing tactics of the student movement is its use of nudity, specifically topless women. There were many "nude" student protests over the months, the most notable during the Montreal Grand Prix.

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Ten ridings to watch: Trinity-Spadina -- solid NDP with changing demographics

Election 2011: rabble.ca has chosen 10 key ridings across Canada for progressives to watch in the run-up to the May 2 vote, and asked local writers to assess them. The profiles highlight why the riding profiled is important and issues local campaigns are focused upon.

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Ten ridings to watch: Burnaby-Douglas, an NDP homeland

Election 2011: rabble.ca has chosen 10 key ridings across Canada for progressives to watch in the run-up to the May 2 vote, and asked local writers to assess them. The profiles highlight why the riding profiled is important and issues local campaigns are focused upon.

The riding of Burnaby-Douglas was created in 1996, with the majority of residents coming from a wide number of communities. The various Chinese communities make up more than half of that majority, with South Asians at 15 per cent and Filipinos at seven per cent. English is the language spoken at home in 60 per cent of Burnaby homes, with one in five households Chinese speaking. French is not among the top 10 languages and is spoken at home by less than one per cent.

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Ten ridings to watch: Will Elizabeth May and the Greens take Saanich-Gulf Islands?

Election 2011: rabble.ca has chosen 10 key ridings across Canada for progressives to watch in the run-up to the May 2 vote, and asked local writers to assess them. The profiles highlight why the riding profiled is important and issues local campaigns are focused upon.

Will Elizabeth May pull off one of the most heartening upsets in the 2011 federal election campaign?

The 56-year-old Green Party leader and candidate for Saanich-Gulf Islands on Vancouver Island has been running against Conservative Gary Lunn, the minister of state for sport (and the 2010 Winter Olympics), an old-school Alliance/Reform Party stalwart with five successful terms of office behind him.

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Ten ridings to watch: No Bloc party in Gatineau as NDP pursue

Election 2011: rabble.ca has chosen 10 key ridings across Canada for progressives to watch in the run-up to the May 2 vote, and asked local writers to assess them. The profiles highlight why the riding is important and issues local campaigns are focused on.

In Gatineau, incumbent Bloc MP Richard Nadeau is fighting hard to retain his seat, which he won from the previous Liberal MP with a handful of votes. That MP was no one else than Françoise Boivin, now running for the NDP!

Boivin's defection from the Liberal Party was controversial, linked with allegations (not proven) of malpractices. It now seems in any case that Françoise has the capacity to regain her seat as she is benefiting from the orange crush "wave".

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What we're (not) talking about when we talk about the Franklin expeditions

"The Arctic Council planning a search for Sir John Franklin," by Stephen Pearce

It was beginning to seem like it would never happen. For a sixth year, the Harper government was sending a team into the Arctic to search for the lost Franklin ships. The expeditions were starting to seem as doomed as Franklin's own: the British explorer famously got stuck in Arctic ice during his 1845 expedition to navigate the Northwest Passage. He never made it. Franklin and all 128 men from his two British navy ships -- HMS Erebus and HMS Terror -- escaped to land, where one by one they died from a somewhat predictable inability to survive in the Arctic environment, resorting to a bit of cannibalism along the way.

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Tony Clement floats lies and trial balloons on Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Photo: flickr/icannphotos

Tony Clement recently let go of a trial balloon at an editorial board meeting with the Kitchener Record. Clement was commenting on the disastrous Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) and attempted to pass blame for the massive growth and absence of integrity within the program on to the Liberals.

Clement said, "This program was created prior to [us taking] office, and has grown [since 2002] by 1,818 per cent. That to me sounds a little bit excessive." 

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Scotland votes no: U.K. muddles through

Photo: Kyoshi Masamune/flickr

It was not to be. With an 87 per cent turnout, Scottish independence was rejected by 55 per cent of voters in the September 18 referendum.

Following vigorous debate and discussion throughout the country, the Yes campaign gained strength leading up to the vote, up 20 percentage points in support, but it still fell short of the No side.

Vote-counting from each of 32 local authorities (councils) went on through the night until the decisive result from Fife at 6 a.m. local time Friday. Early returns revealed No strength with a series of wins reported by locality. The capital, affluent Edinburgh, and the oil capital, Aberdeen, gave some 60 per cent votes to the No.

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Canadian spy agencies are running reckless

Photo: flickr/Elvert Barnes

How much does it concern you that your emails, texts, social media and phone calls might be monitored?

If recent polling from both around the world and here at home is any indication, it probably concerns you quite a bit.

Earlier this month, the Pew Forum published the results of a global survey that shows a significant majority of people from around the world find it unacceptable that the U.S. monitors both foreigners and its own citizens. The same poll shows that a wide margin of those polled in 43 countries disapprove of the U.S.'s monitoring of the communications of other world leaders.

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