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Photo: Alexandre Guédon/Flickr
| February 18, 2013

Quebec government steps up police repression as student movement seeks to broaden struggle

This promises to be a familiar scene this summer in Montreal. (Photo: fatseth / flickr)

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The opening salvo in a promised, summer of protest by Quebec's student movement was delivered at the annual, Montreal Grand Prix auto race and surrounding festivities from June 7 to 10. Hundreds, sometimes thousands, of students and their allies used the high-profile event to press demands for a freeze in post-secondary tuition fees and an end to police and state repression.

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| June 7, 2012

Expect more Casseroles across Canada

Pots and pans solidarity from way up in Dawson City, Yukon. (Photo: Wanda Roe)
A day after Casseroles for Quebec students were held in 70 cities and towns - including Dawson City, Yukon - the Charest government has called off talks.

Related rabble.ca story:

| May 30, 2012
| May 30, 2012

Ottawa night march sets stage for cross-Canada 'Casseroles'

A night rally in Ottawa showed solidarity with Quebec students. (Photo: Ben Powless)
On the eve of today's cross-Canada actions, a night rally in Ottawa showed solidarity with Quebec students.

Related rabble.ca story:

How Occupy and the Indignados helped inspire Quebec, where 'every street is Wall Street'

Sitting in the living room of a friend's Mile End apartment just shy of 8:00pm of Thursday, I am called into the street by the deafening sound of clanging pots and pans.

On the residential street lined with Montreal's classic triplex townhouses, people of all ages are gathering with their cookware. Children clang at the doorstep of their friends calling to them to come out.

The now nightly "casseroles" are the latest form of popular outrage to premier Jean Charest's new special law that curbs freedom of assembly and association rights, in a bid to break three months of social unrest.

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Columnists

The taming of Jean Charest

Jean Charest was an early critic of the newly majority Harper government for its 'we won, and we get to do what we want' attitude to opposition. Ironically, sadly and, ultimately, stupidly, not much later Charest went ahead and adopted a similar attitude himself when faced with student opposition to his proposed 75 per cent increases to tuition fees (over five years, since pushed up to 82 per cent over seven years).

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Night march magic: Quebec people's movement takes over the streets

Night after night, this is the scene in Montreal. (Photo: Elvis in Montreal / flickr)

It is well past midnight and I have been marching non-stop for the past four hours. There are literally tens of thousands of people marching throughout Montreal tonight!

The march I participated in started in one neighbourhood in Montreal, the Plateau, with a couple of dozen people at the corner of Mt-Royal and De Lorimier at 8pm. Within half an hour we were a thousand strong as people came out streaming from their homes, from restaurant terraces and coffee shops banging on pots and pans.

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