Amy Goodman

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Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on 650 stations in North America. Check out Democracy Now! everyday on rabbletv.
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Wikileaks continues as Julian Assange awaits the U.S. case against him

Image: Surian Soosay/flickr

Tucked away on a side street in one of London's toniest neighborhoods, just across the street from the sprawling department store Harrods, sits a brick, Victorian-era apartment building that houses the Ecuadorean embassy. Julian Assange, the founder and editor of the whistle-blower website Wikileaks, walked into this embassy on June 19, 2012, and hasn't stepped foot outside since.

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A victory for nuclear disarmament: Plowshares activists released from prison

Photo: Scott Schumacher/flickr

There is a vast military complex deep in the hills of eastern Tennessee called "Y-12." This is where all of the highly enriched uranium is produced and stored for the production of the U.S. nuclear-warhead arsenal. It is in Oak Ridge, the city that was created practically overnight during the Second World War, that produced the uranium for the atomic bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. Today, the facility, dubbed "The Fort Knox of Uranium," holds enough of the radioactive element to make 10,000 nuclear bombs.

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Columnists

Community radio station KPFT endures through bombings and hate

Photo: luna715/flickr

"Pacifica Station Bombed Off Air," read the Houston Chronicle's banner headline on May 13, 1970. KPFT, Houston's fledgling community radio station, had been on the air for just two months when its transmitter was blown to smithereens. "An explosion which demolished the transmitter of Houston station KPFT-FM (Pacifica Radio) was no accident and apparently the work of experts, authorities said today," George Rosenblatt of the Chronicle wrote. "The blast occurred at 11 p.m. Tuesday. The station was playing 'Alice's Restaurant' and at the precise moment of the explosion, Arlo Guthrie was singing, 'Kill, kill, kill' as he spoofed the draft."

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Columnists

Calls for justice and accountability fuel Black Lives Matter movement

Photo: Light Brigading/flickr

"What do you hope to accomplish with this protest," I asked a 13-year-old girl marching in Staten Island, N.Y., last August, protesting the police killing of Eric Garner.

"To live until I'm 18," the young teen, named Aniya, replied. Could that possibly be the American dream today?

Aniya went on: "You want to get older. You want to experience life. You don't want to die in a matter of seconds because of cops." It's that sentiment that has fuelled the Black Lives Matter movement across the country.

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Columnists

Marking a century of women's peace-building

Photo: Mike Atherton/flickr

THE HAGUE, Netherlands -- One hundred years ago, more than 1,000 women gathered in The Hague during the First World War, demanding peace. Britain denied passports to more than 120 women, forbidding them from making the trip to suppress their peaceful dissent. Now, a century later, in these very violent times, nearly 1,000 women have gathered here again, this time from Africa, Asia and Latin America, as well as Europe and North America, saying "No" to wars from Iraq to Afghanistan to Yemen to Syria, not to mention the wars in our streets at home. They were marking the 100th anniversary of the founding of WILPF, the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Dr.

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Columnists

Gyrocopter pilot delivers message about plutocracy to White House

Photo: Dave W/flickr

"Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds," reads the unofficial motto of the United States Postal Service. We now can add to that "nor a national security no-fly zone," as demonstrated by mailman Doug Hughes. Hughes was doing what he felt was his duty, carrying letters. He had 535 of them: one for each member of Congress, and each signed by Hughes himself. He wrote about the corrupting influence of money in politics. Hughes chose a very high-profile method for delivering his letters, though. He piloted a bicycle-sized helicopter, called a "gyrocopter," 100 miles from Maryland, and landed on the west lawn of the U.S Capitol, passing through restricted airspace.

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Open veins and conciliation on the path of U.S.-Cuban relations

Photo: PresidenciaRD/flickr

For the first time in more than half a century, the presidents of the United States and Cuba have had a formal meeting. Barack Obama met with Cuban President Raúl Castro at the 7th Summit of the Americas, held this year in Panama City. Cuba's participation has been blocked by the U.S. since the summit began in 1994. This historic moment occurs with some sadness, however: Eduardo Galeano, the great Uruguayan writer who did so much to explain the deeply unequal relations between Latin America and the U.S. and Europe, died as the summit ended.

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What will it take for the U.S. to end capital punishment?

Photo: Thomas Hawk/flickr

A jury in Boston has returned a guilty verdict on all 30 counts against the Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Now the jury must deliberate on the punishment, which could be either life in prison or death. Capital punishment is outlawed in Massachusetts, but Tsarnaev was tried in federal court, where the death penalty is allowed. The jury will have to decide whether he lives or dies. The case provides a new reason to take a hard look at capital punishment, and why this irreversible, highly problematic practice should be banned.

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Indiana's anti-LGBTQ law legalizes intolerance

Image: Mike Licht/flickr

The date was August 7, 1930. The place: Marion, Indiana. Three young African-American men were lynched. The horror of the crime was captured by a local photographer. The image of two hanging, bloodied bodies is among the most iconic in the grim archive of documented lynchings in America. Most associate lynching with the Deep South, with the vestiges of slavery and the rise of Jim Crow. But this was in the North. Marion is in northern Indiana, halfway between Indianapolis and Fort Wayne, and about 150 miles from Chicago. But intolerance knows no borders.

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We need to take responsibility for the true cost of war

Image: Lance Page / t r u t h o u t; Adapted: jamesomalley, The U.S. Army, Eddi

What price would you pay not to kill another human being? At what point would you commit the offences allegedly perpetrated by Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was charged Wednesday with desertion and "misbehavior before an enemy?"

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