activismSyndicate content

The reasons behind my expulsion from Seoul G20

Paul Quintos is the international policy officer of the Filipino think-tank the IBON Foundation. He and at least seven other activists from the Philippines were detained and deported by immigration officials at Seoul Incheon Airport prior to the start of the Seoul G20 conference. This is the address he sent after his expulsion to delegates who were attending an IBON-sponsored conference on Charting Alternatives for the Global Economy

First of all, I would like to express my deep regret that I am unable to join you today in Korea.

embedded_video

So, Rob Ford is mayor! What do we do now?

So, Rob Ford is Mayor. I've been sitting on Facebook (my social media of choice) and watching the pain, fear and sadness descend on my friends and colleagues. There is shock that this happened. How could it? What does this mean? Who did this to us? But, they hate us gay, Chinese, cycling, latte drinking intelligentsia? Should I move?

Don't move! Create solutions!

Ever the optimist, I have been thinking about what this means for us. For democracy. For electoral politics. For the Centre for Social Innovation. For the citizens of Toronto.

embedded_video

Columnists

Sasha: On the decriminalization of sex work in Ontario

So... that happened.

Alec Baldwin uttered these unforgettable words after emerging from a car crash unscathed in David Mamet's film State And Main.

I must say I feel just about the same way. After bitching (and this would be an appropriate word, because I have been a fucking bitch about this a lot of the time) for the past 16 years about decriminalizing sex work, something wholly unexpected happened on Tuesday afternoon.

Sex work was decriminalized in Ontario.

I was picking up some groceries at Fiesta Farms when I got the news on my BlackBerry. A flurry of emails and texts from colleagues at Maggie's and other sex worker rights organizations (mostly, "WTF? Is this really happening?") proved that, yes, this was really happening.

Columnists

The criminalization of dissent in the U.S.

Early in the morning on Friday, September 24, FBI agents in Chicago and Minnesota's Twin Cities kicked in the doors of anti-war activists, brandishing guns, spending hours rifling through their homes. The FBI took away computers, photos, notebooks and other personal property. Residents were issued subpoenas to appear before a grand jury in Chicago. It was just the latest in the ongoing crackdown on dissent in the U.S., targeting peace organizers as supporters of "foreign terrorist organizations."

Columnists

The tar sands, corporate dominance and civil disobedience

In the world of progressive, grassroots politics, everyone, it seems, is running as fast as they can. That is certainly the impression I have had over the past few years when almost everyone I know is involved in several social movement activities or individual actions.

Voices of dissent: International Festival of Poetry of Resistance

Arnold Itwaru, one of the poets performing at International Festival of Poetry of Resistance in Toronto. Photo: Chisato Fukuyama

From Aime Cesaire and Pablo Neruda to Mahmoud Darwish and Wislawa Szymborska, poets throughout the world have raised their voices in protest against injustice in all its forms.

And poets, artists, musicians and social activists will gather in various Toronto venues later this month to celebrate the boundless capacity of verse to resist oppression and create links among diverse communities. The International Festival of Poetry of Resistance (From September 16 to 20) will feature readings, roundtable discussions, musical performances and a special "festivalito" for children.

embedded_video

Israelis risk jail to smuggle Palestinians

Nearly 600 Israelis have signed up for a campaign of civil disobedience, vowing to risk jail to smuggle Palestinian women and children into Israel for a brief taste of life outside the occupied West Bank.

The Israelis say they have been inspired by the example of Ilana Hammerman, a writer who is threatened with prosecution after publishing an article in which she admitted breaking the law to bring three Palestinian teenagers into Israel for a day out.

Ms. Hammerman said she wanted to give the young women, who had never left the West Bank, "some fun" and a chance to see the Mediterranean for the first time.

Her story has shocked many Israelis and led to a police investigation after right-wing groups called for her to be tried for security offences.

embedded_video

Harper's lousy, pre-election summer: A review

Stephen Harper at the World Economic Forum. Photo: World Economic Forum/Flickr

After having his way with Canadians and our political system for four-plus years, cracks have begun to appear in Stephen Harper's carefully constructed tower of power. His minority government, elected by just one in five potential voters, is looking, well, pregnable. In other words, democracy -- that too-long-hijacked concept -- is starting to happen once again.

Yes, the Conservative power tower, which once loomed solidly over Canada, apparently invulnerable, and its often-arrogant inhabitants, have been rocked more than once recently. The structure is showing so many fault lines, it's difficult to know where to begin itemizing them -- but I'd love to try.

embedded_video

After the U.S. Social Forum 2010: The potential for a multi-scalar strategy

Is the U.S. Social Forum primarily an arena for movements to propose a diversity of alternatives or is it a political agent of the left that pulls movements together into a counter-hegemonic program? Photo: Sasha Y. Kimel/Flickr
Is the U.S. Social Forum primarily an arena for movements to propose a diversity of alternatives or is it a political agent of the left that pulls movements together into a counter-hegemonic program?

Related rabble.ca story:

After the U.S. Social Forum 2010: The potential for a multi-scalar strategy

Is the U.S. Social Forum primarily an arena for movements to propose a diversity of alternatives or is it a political agent of the left that pulls movements together into a counter-hegemonic program? Photo: Sasha Y. Kimel/Flickr

In 1933, Mexican artist Diego Rivera completed his Detroit Industry fresco cycle. The abundant, controversial work, considered one the 20th century's outstanding achievements of monumental art, covers the four walls of the Garden Court in the Detroit Institute of Art.

embedded_video

Syndicate content