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Peoples' Social Forum: 500 workshops, 19 assemblies, 5,000 voices and a declaration

Photo: Elizabeth Littlejohn

After the Peoples' Social Forum (PSF) ended this weekend, tents at the University of Ottawa were left empty. Booths covered with art and information that lined the once busy streets had disappeared. There were no longer people standing on the corners of streets passing out magazines and independent film screening ads. But while the forum may be over, participants and organizers are hoping that its impact is ongoing. 

The final event of the Peoples' Social Forum looked to the future. It was the Social Movements Assembly. The assembly established a non-partisan extra-parliamentary opposition in order to enable the spirit of the convergence to work beyond the forum.

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Peoples' Social Forum: Day two

August 22, 2014
| Listen to highlights from day two of the Peoples' Social Forum, including: being an activist in Alberta, creating a Department of Peace, and independent media in Canada.
Length: 28:29 minutes (52.17 MB)
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The Peoples' Social Forum: The first day

August 21, 2014
| Highlights from the first day of a gathering of activists, journalists, artists and thinkers in Ottawa from across Canada.
Length: 31:06 minutes (56.98 MB)

If organizing is the weapon of the oppressed, why are we stuck on mobilizing?

Photo: flickr/Jorene Rene

The rebellion in Ferguson, Missouri, against the killing of unarmed Afrikan American teenager Michael Brown has inspired me to reflect on the question of the organizing model versus mobilizing or mobilization model in the struggle for Afrikan liberation in North America as well as the broader humanistic fight for liberation from various forms of oppression. Organizing the oppressed for emancipation is the preferred approach to engaging them in the fight for their liberation as opposed to merely mobilizing them.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
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  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
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| August 19, 2014
Photo: flickr/Global Panorama
| August 14, 2014
| August 13, 2014

Interview: The politicization of Charlie Angus

Meg Borthwick speaks with MP Charlie Angus for our Revolution 101 series about his activist work, past and present.

Related rabble.ca story:

August 6, 2014 |
Palestine resistance and solidarity are challenging imperialism.
| August 4, 2014
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