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Food is an election issue

Photo: Nick in exsilio/Flickr
The People's Food Policy is encouraging voters to attend debates and ask candidates questions about the close to 2.5 million Canadians who are regularly concerned about having enough food to eat.

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Columnists

Corporate rotten eggs

What do a half-billion eggs have to do with democracy? The massive recall of salmonella-infected eggs, the largest egg recall in U.S. history, opens a window on the power of large corporations over not only our health, but over our government.

While scores of brands have been recalled, they all can be traced back to just two egg farms. Our food supply is increasingly in the hands of larger and larger companies, which wield enormous power in our political process. As with the food industry, so, too, is it with oil and with banks: Giant corporations, some with budgets larger than most nations, are controlling our health, our environment, our economy and increasingly, our elections.

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MakerCulture: Playing with our food

Our comestibles get artists' creative juices flowing, both in and out of the kitchen.

It's an unusual Friday night at Grinder, a small coffee shop in Toronto. There is an alien in someone's cup, hearts in another and someone else sees their face in their mug.

What's even stranger is how local artists replaced paintbrushes and pencils with milk and cinnamon powder. The cause of this madness is an event called "Medium: Coffee Live Latte Art for Non-Latte Artists."

What these five artists did is part of the MakerCulture movement, the idea of taking things into your own hands, and producing new objects.

"It was different," says Abra Dolman, a participating artist. "I can't say I've ever used coffee, espresso, or milk as a medium before."

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WINGS

Earth Rights

February 9, 2015
| Part two of a speech by Vandana Shiva, in which she addresses solutions based in human rights allied to rights of nature.
Length: 29:29 minutes (40.51 MB)

Cabbagetown Family Day Festival 2015

Monday, February 16, 2015 - 11:00am - 5:00pm

Location

Parliament St between Gerrard St & Wellesley St Toronto, ON
Canada
43° 39' 11.6136" N, 79° 22' 59.4624" W

CABBAGETOWN FAMILY DAY FESTIVAL 2015

http://cabbagetownto.com

 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. – FREE ADMISSION

 

The inaugural free admission Cabbagetown Family Day Festival produced by The Cabbagetown BIA will be bringing families together in celebration of the long holiday weekend.  The festival takes place along Parliament Street, between Gerrard Street & Wellesley Street.

 

Five more global food trends for 2015

Photo: flickr/Conny c

This is going to be the busiest year ever for global food movements. Ten issues are ready for prime time.

I already reviewed five of these -- the rebellion of underpaid food producers, empathy for livestock animals, appreciation for the life-force and probiotics behind food, the central role of youth in food movements and a rising swell of food politics.

Today, I rush through the last five.

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Five global food trends for 2015

I have no idea whether cauliflower will send kale back to the farm leagues this year, or if Greek yoghurt is doomed to eat the dust of customers rushing away to kefir, or whether harissa will redefine cool and sriracha will be yesterday's hot sauce.

But I can see some clear trends arising from deep-going changes within our global food system. We are in a moment of greater shift disturbing than any since the modern food movement emerged full-blown from distinct social, cultural, spiritual, ecological and public health organizations during the 1990s.

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The Brazil Food Guide: Look at food differently in 2015

Photo: Flickr/Fernando Stankuns

This is the year we can all look to Brazil's Food Guide for tips on how to consider what we eat in a new light.

The holiday and feasting season in December is the hardest time of the year to be counting calories on a diet. January is a different story as many of us turn to food as a source of our resolutions. This January is probably the easiest time to try out Brazil’s bold dietary guidelines, issued this year and recently made available in English. 

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image: rabble.ca
| January 7, 2015
Photo: A protest against GMOs in the European Parliament. Photo by Euractiv
| January 5, 2015
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