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| March 27, 2015

Ed Broadbent on 'Building a Better Canada' and Progress Summit 2015

On Friday March 27, Ed Broadbent delivered this opening address to the audience Progress Summit 2015.

Please read the full text below.

 

Good morning everyone.

Bon matin tout le monde.

Thank you, Chief Whiteduck, for welcoming us to your traditional territory.

And thank you, Joy, for that splendid gender neutral version of our national anthem.

On behalf of the hard-working team at the Broadbent Institute, I welcome all of you to the second annual Progress Summit.

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| March 27, 2015
| March 26, 2015
| March 24, 2015
Columnists

The law of mobilization and the defeat of Stephen Harper

Photo: Chris Yakimov/flickr

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Outstanding political leaders inspire, motivate, and rally support. Whether it be Churchill in wartime, De Gaulle in exile, or Indira Gandhi campaigning for the eradication of poverty, these leaders stood out because people responded to the calls for action.

It is a law of politics: to make things happen, people have to be mobilized. The political party that succeeds is the one that builds support, and gets people to vote for it.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

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  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
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Columnists

Beyond dirty politics: Harperism threatens democracy itself

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr

It's getting worse.

Stephen Harper is now serving notice that he's willing to tear the social fabric of the country apart if that's what it takes to get his party re-elected. That is, if torquing democratic process, the rule of law, election rules, the tax system etc., etc., to make them conform to Harperism isn't enough, he'll throw stink bombs in the public place in the expectation that, amid the chaos, he'll be seen as the strong hand who can straighten things out.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Columnists

Civic literacy and the assault on Canadian democracy

Photo: teachandlearn/flickr

The Harper government's pursuit of its odious Secret Police Act (C-51) is just another chapter in the most through-going and massive social engineering project in the history of the country. Social engineering used to be one of the favourite phrases of the right in its attack on social programs -- accusing both liberal-minded politicians and meddling bureaucrats with manufacturing the welfare state. They conveniently ignored the fact that there was huge popular demand and support for activist government.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
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| March 19, 2015
Image: Wikimedia commons
| March 16, 2015
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