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| June 26, 2015
Columnists

In the shadow of Paul Martin: Can you trust the Liberals?

Photo: Georges Alexandar/Michael Ignatieff/flickr

Here we go again -- the Red Book 3.0, yet another build-up of Liberal election promises just like the ones we've seen before (though I admit the one about changing the voting system might be hard to dodge). The most infamous, of course, was Jean Chretien's, which he held high and waved at every opportunity in the 1993 election. Co-authored by Paul Martin, it promised the world as we would like it: strong communities, enhanced medicare, equality, increased funding for education, an end to child poverty. You could almost hear the violins playing. But what turned out to be the most remarkable thing about the book of promises was the record number that was ultimately broken: all of them.

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Dean Del Mastro
| June 25, 2015
Image: Flickr/Matt Jiggins
| June 23, 2015
June 22, 2015 |
The Conservatives’ announced planned consultations on allowing for voluntary individual contributions to the Canada Pension Plan will not lead to any real help for workers worried about having a secur
Image: Flickr/Mohammed Jangda
| June 19, 2015

Changes to Nutrition North voted down in Parliament

Photo: flickr/creative commons

A motion calling for urgent reform to the Nutrition North Canada food subsidy program was defeated in Parliament last week.

The NDP-led motion, first proposed in March by Northwest Territories MP Dennis Bevington, called for five "immediate" reforms to the federal food subsidy program, including the addition of 46 remote communities currently ineligible for the program.

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How Bill C-59 will quietly reshape Canadian privacy law

Photo: flickr/ Stefano Mortellaro

A budget implementation bill is an unlikely -- and many would say inappropriate -- place to make major changes to Canadian privacy law. Yet Bill C-59, the government's 158-page bill that is set to sweep through the House of Commons, does just that.

The omnibus budget bill touches on a wide range of issues, including copyright term extension and retroactive reforms to access to information laws. But there are also privacy amendments that have received little attention.

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June 16, 2015 |
Both Bill C-51 and government discourse greatly trouble the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group (ICLMG), an Inter Pares counterpart.
Columnists

The spoiler: Gilles Duceppe returns as BQ leader

Photo: Stephen Downes/flickr

With former leader Gilles Duceppe taking over the leadership of the Bloc Québécois (BQ) from Mario Beaulieu, the only party able to threaten the NDP in Quebec has raised its game.

The Trudeau Liberals have failed to gain traction in francophone Quebec; Conservative support has been limited to the Quebec City area; and the NDP looks comfortably ahead across Quebec, a position Duceppe wants to overturn.

NDP strength meant the BQ -- the party that won 49 per cent of the Quebec vote in 1993, and made Lucien Bouchard Leader of the Official Opposition in Ottawa -- was looking at being shut out in the upcoming October 19 federal election. 

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