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Joe Vipond
| May 26, 2016
St. Albert, Alberta, Post Office
| May 24, 2016

After Census snub, Canada's trans community feels like it doesn't count

Image: Amanda Taylor

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Some members of the transgender community can't help but feel institutionally overlooked after the 2016 census failed to include options for transgender people.  

Groups supportive of LGBTQ rights fear that what may seem like a small oversight by not including non-binary gender options on the census is what leads to entire demographic segments being overlooked both culturally and legislatively. 

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Aaron Wudrick
| May 22, 2016

Looming co-op housing crisis could push 50,000 Canadians out of their homes

Photo by Ion Etxebarria

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Columnists

What do Canadian journalists have against electoral reform?

Photo: Brandon.L/flickr

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I feel like writing a letter to the editor about surly, negative journalistic reactions to the prospect of electoral reform. There are exceptions, though only Andrew Coyne of the National Post comes to mind.

Many journalists seem preemptively nostalgic for a foul, undemocratic system that has only longevity in its favour, like the death penalty in the U.S. Pardon, the death penalty may have more to be said for it.

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Pierre Nkurunziza, President of Burundi.
| May 18, 2016
Image: Wikimedia Commons
| May 17, 2016
Image: PMO Photo by Adam Scotti
| May 16, 2016
Image: Flickr/Tijen Erol
| May 13, 2016
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