Canadian politicsSyndicate content

Libby Davies' statement on deciding not to run in 2015

After almost 40 years of public service and elected office, it's time for me to call it a day. I have worked hard as the Member of Parliament for Vancouver East for the last 18 years and I know it's time for me to pass the torch. I will not be seeking re-election in the next federal election.

It has been the most extraordinary experience to represent the people of Vancouver East. I have loved my work both in the community and in Ottawa and I thank the good folks of east Vancouver who elected me six times as their representative.

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.

What will the NDP do without Libby Davies?

Libby Davies will not run again in 2015. This puts one of the NDP's most secure seats in play, and leaves a gaping hole on the portside of the party.

Related rabble.ca story:

Without Libby Davies, what course will the NDP chart?

Photo: Libby Davies

The New Democratic Party's political boat is listing today with the announcement by Vancouver East MP Libby Davies that she will not seek re-election in 2015. Her departure from the caucus will not only put in play one of the most secure NDP seats in the country, but more importantly will leave a gaping hole on the portside of the party. 

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Michael Cooper
| December 11, 2014

Harper's Canada: What have we become?

Harperism: How Stephen Harper and his think tank colleagues have transformed Canada

by Donald Gutstein
(Lorimer,
2014;
$22.95)

Does it ever feel like you've just woken up and found yourself living in a country you don't recognize? How did Canada get to where it is today -- a more militaristic, nationalistic, free-market-at-all-costs place that seems to have shed its world-renowned reputation as a land of peacekeepers, multiculturalism, social responsibility and scientific advancement?

It hasn't been by accident. In fact, as Donald Gutstein points out in the opening phrase of his book, Harperism: How Stephen Harper and his Think Tank Colleagues Have Transformed Canada, this is exactly what Prime Minister Stephen Harper promised he'd do.

And he did it with a little bit of help from his friends.

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Photo: flickr/Stephen Harper
| December 10, 2014
| December 10, 2014

What Canadians are learning from Ferguson

Photo: flickr/Rebel Sage

The discourse surrounding the announcements that the police officers who killed Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO and Eric Garner in Staten Island, NY will not be facing indictments is not something that can be framed as though we are speaking of isolated events.

It also cannot be, as is so often done, from a place of "us" vs. "them."

Too often Canadians rationalize our issues by saying that, "it's okay -- because we are not America." Playing identity politics with the crux of our identity being about not being tolerant -- just tolerant relative to the U.S. has created an environment wherein complacency is easy and activism and striving for social change is difficult. Because of this, we are having our own dialogue-turned-heated-debates on racism's place in this country.

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
| December 8, 2014
Photo: flickr/Matt Jiggins
| December 8, 2014
Syndicate content