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Remembrance Day is about the past, not the present

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr

Remembrance Days grow clearer in retrospect. They remember past wars after all, not wars happening now or about to happen. Those are contentious; they involve arguments and disagreements about whether they should proceed. Past wars are simply past. The remembrance focuses on those who suffered or died in them and didn't deserve to, which is the vast majority in all wars.

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| November 13, 2014
Columnists

Canada's rapidly growing wealth gap remains off the political agenda. Why?

Photo: v i p e z/flickr

The Onion magazine suggests we should consider the gap between rich and poor the Eighth Wonder of the World -- "a tremendous, millennia-old expanse that fills us with both wonder and humility … the most colossal and enduring of mankind's creations."

Another aspect of the rich-poor gap that has always filled me with wonder is how the rich manage to keep it off the political agenda.

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| November 12, 2014
Columnists

War and peace: Remembering what defines Canada as a nation

Photo: Tjololo Photo/flickr

Certain political and industrial interests are trying to redefine Canada as a nation shaped by war.

What defines Canada is our status as a nation state. Our status evolved over time, peacefully, as we shed colonial ties to Britain and progressively achieved a greater degree of independence. Our independence is not absolute -- the Queen is our sovereign.

Our gradual transition to nation state status stands in contrast to the path taken by our neighbour to the south. Rather than making a unilateral declaration of independence, we chose to work things out with the colonizing power. 

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Russia's New Rubles
| November 12, 2014

Canada: The land of jobless immigrants

Photo: flickr/Steven Okabe

Welcome to Canada. We lied about the opportunities.

That is the realistic undertone to the new immigration policy announcement by Citizenship and Immigration Minister Chris Alexander on October 31, 2014, which declared that Canada aims to welcome as many as 285,000 new permanent residents next year.

The last time Canada admitted as many as 280,000 permanent residents was in 2010. According to the Minister, this is the highest planned total "in recent history," and is designed to "attract skilled immigrants" who will "help contribute to our economy and labour market."

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| November 11, 2014
| November 6, 2014
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