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Is slow 'growth' inevitable? A progressive response to sustained stagnation

Photo: Yasmeen/flickr

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Most of the world economy (including Canada's) has performed sluggishly since the Global Financial Crisis of 2008-09. And many economic and fiscal projections now accept this pattern of slow growth as more or less inevitable, as a "new normal." This argument is typically invoked to justify a ratcheting down of expectations regarding job prospects, incomes and public services.

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Keynes or Friedman? TPP presents an economic choice for the Liberals

Photo: Prime Minister of Canada/flickr

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Photo: KMR Photography/flickr
| August 25, 2015
Columnists

Greek debt negotiations: A Eurozone tragedy -- or will sense prevail?

Photo: Pictoscribe/flickr

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Debunking the Bogeyman: Neoliberalism, austerity and economic agenda

Photo: flickr/401(K) 2012

In August 2011, the U.K.'s The Independent stated that the head of sovereign ratings at Standard & Poor's (S&P) "might be the most powerful man in the world that you've never heard of." S&P had just cut the triple-A credit rating of the U.S. down to AA+, a move that "changed the financial world."

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Debunking the Bogeyman: What role do credit ratings agencies actually play?

Photo: wikimedia commons

It's refreshing to see some Canadian mainstream media columnists challenging the influence of Moody's and the other big credit ratings agencies (CRAs). On July 14, the Toronto Star's Martin Regg Cohn wrote "... it's unclear that those overrated credit rating agencies still hold the sway they once did." On July 17, Rick Salutin questioned their "influence and arrogance."

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Photo: Mstyslav Chernov/Wikimedia Commons
| March 26, 2014

Ukraine cannot just be Ukraine: it's an object of great power meddling

Photo: tandalov.com/flickr
Ukraine cannot just be Ukraine: it's an object of great power meddling. With massed citizen actions calling for change, the Americans wanted to shape the new government, bypassing the European Union.

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Ukraine power play: What's at stake?

Photo: tandalov.com/flickr

"Yats is the guy ..." high-ranking American State Department official Victoria Nuland explained on the phone to the U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine. Their conversation was made available on the Internet by Russia, and got wide attention mainly because Nuland  also said: "F..k the EU."

A former central banker ready to apply austerity policies to his country, Arseniy "Yats" Yatsenyuk is now the interim Prime Minister of Ukraine, until the May 25 elections are held. Former President Viktor Yanukovych fled the country, and was deposed by parliament late in February.

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Figure 1. Inflation and average real wages, 2010-2013. Source: Statistics Canada
| January 22, 2014
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