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Open veins and conciliation on the path of U.S.-Cuban relations

Photo: PresidenciaRD/flickr

For the first time in more than half a century, the presidents of the United States and Cuba have had a formal meeting. Barack Obama met with Cuban President Raúl Castro at the 7th Summit of the Americas, held this year in Panama City. Cuba's participation has been blocked by the U.S. since the summit began in 1994. This historic moment occurs with some sadness, however: Eduardo Galeano, the great Uruguayan writer who did so much to explain the deeply unequal relations between Latin America and the U.S. and Europe, died as the summit ended.

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Columnists

Meeting Castro: Harper fails history, feigns support for democracy

Photo: OEA - OAS/flickr

Stephen Harper met Cuban President Raúl Castro at the Summit of the Americas in Panama City last weekend. Officials called it a "pull aside" to signify it was not a formal sit-down meeting, but the prime minister still described it as "a long and detailed" conversation.

If Stephen Harper has gotten his way, Cuba would still be uninvited to the regular get-togethers of heads of government, held under the auspices of the Organization of American States (OAS).

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| February 14, 2015
| December 11, 2014

Latin Americans pay the price for corporate climate destruction

Photo: flickr/Development Planning Unit

Information contained in a new report that details how multinational corporations are destroying the environment and causing serious climate damage in Latin America brings attention to an important area not being discussed at the UN COP 20 climate negotiations being held in Peru.

The report describes in detail how the destruction caused by three European multinational corporations is typical of the damage caused by multi-nationals throughout the continent.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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| November 14, 2014
Shin Imai, Justice and Corporate Accountability Project, Osgoode Hall Law School
| October 30, 2014
| June 5, 2014
Redeye

A conversation with Arundhati Roy

April 8, 2014
| Arundhati Roy paid her first visit to Vancouver in early April. While she was there, Carmen Rodriguez took the opportunity to talk with her about politics, writing and resistance movements.
Length: 22:54 minutes (20.98 MB)
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