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Not Rex: Pope Francis calls out capitalism as culprit for climate change

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It takes something special for a religious patriarch to resist capitalism and climate change. And true catastrophe is it for Pope Francis as he urges world leaders to hear the cry of the earth.

The Pope still has a ways to go on other issues (re: women's rights, LGBTQ rights, etc.), so let's hope this new wave will continue.

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Photo: Martin Schulz/flickr
| June 23, 2015
face2face

Smita Singh on social change and human trafficking

June 19, 2015
| In this episode, Smita Singh talks about her work with trafficked girls, young women's resilience, why trafficking isn't always about poverty and how things are getting better.
Length: 36:42 minutes (42.01 MB)
face2face

Atom Egoyan on remorse, reconciliation and national self-determination

June 18, 2015
| Listen in as Atom speaks about his approach to understanding the human condition, remorse and reconciliation, national self-determination and the stories he tells.
Length: 49:54 minutes (57.12 MB)

Womanist Musings

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Intercontinental Cry Magazine

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Photo: David Reece/flickr
| June 9, 2015
Columnists

Last chance for sustainable development?

Photo: theverb.org/flickr. Credit: Speak Your Mind // Lachie McKenzie

Roughly once each decade since the early 1970s, representatives of national governments from around the world have held major gatherings to tackle global environmental issues.

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Columnists

Community radio station KPFT endures through bombings and hate

Photo: luna715/flickr

"Pacifica Station Bombed Off Air," read the Houston Chronicle's banner headline on May 13, 1970. KPFT, Houston's fledgling community radio station, had been on the air for just two months when its transmitter was blown to smithereens. "An explosion which demolished the transmitter of Houston station KPFT-FM (Pacifica Radio) was no accident and apparently the work of experts, authorities said today," George Rosenblatt of the Chronicle wrote. "The blast occurred at 11 p.m. Tuesday. The station was playing 'Alice's Restaurant' and at the precise moment of the explosion, Arlo Guthrie was singing, 'Kill, kill, kill' as he spoofed the draft."

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Mark Vander Vennen on mental health, despair and social Justice

May 4, 2015
| Mark Vander Vennen discusses shame versus guilt, mental health, how we’re all wired for relationships, how we reflect on despair and why we need to listen more look beyond ourselves.
Length: 46:19 minutes (53.01 MB)
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