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| July 29, 2015

UN Committee supports charities in fight for freedom of expression

Photo: flickr/ Lucas Hayas

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Canada has received a rebuke from a United Nations treaty monitoring body for its lack of respect for human rights. The Human Rights Committee (HRC) released a lengthy list of issues it cited as concerning as part of its concluding observations on the country's review of civil and political rights.

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Thirty-seven per cent of Canadians think torture could be justified

"If the Canadian government used torture against people 'suspected' of terrorism, do you think this could be justified?" Thirty-seven per cent of people polled said yes.

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Canadians get on board the torture train

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr

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Just before the annual orgy of Canada Day self-celebration, the Pew Research Center released a poll revealing that over one-third of Canadians supported the use of torture. This was no late April Fool's joke, but rather a shocking figure that was part of a global survey on U.S. foreign policy and the use of what has been referred to as "enhanced interrogation techniques."

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July 24, 2015 |
Report from the UN Committee raises concerns about missing and murdered Aboriginal women, Bill C-51, immigration detention measures for asylum seekers, among a wide range of issues.
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Rendition: Canada, Sweden and Denmark share the same barbaric practice

Photo: Justin Norman/flickr

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What factor is common to Canada, Sweden and Denmark? The snow, perhaps? The cold weather? The social programs? Or maybe smoked salmon?

How about rendition to torture? And how about cooperation with the intelligence authorities of countries which practice torture with total impunity? These may be some of the darkest common factors shared by the three countries, ones that not everyone is aware of.

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Pan Am medals win gold in unethical sourcing, say advocates

Photo: MISN used with permission

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When Meaghan Benfeito and Rosaline Filion won gold for Canada in women's 10-metre synchronized diving, the pair's smooth pike and entrance into the water mesmerized viewers.

What wasn't being talked about were the two pieces of hardware each diver had won. One gold apiece for the paired event, another silver for Filion and a bronze for Benfeito from the individual 10-metre dive.

All were provided by Barrick Gold.

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Image: Flickr/pmwebphotos
| July 16, 2015
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