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| December 25, 2014
Columnists

Education has changed, administrative structure has not

Photo: frankjuarez/flickr

The malfunction at the Tri-County (Digby-Yarmouth-Shelburne) regional school board revealed by the auditor general is not just a bump in the road, nor is it just about education.

As the most recent of a string of similarly misfiring school boards, it's close to the heart of the general malaise in public administration that's been rising for a generation in this province and which governments, knee-deep in small politics, struggle fitfully and sometimes counterproductively to manage.

In fact, the McNeil government would have done better to have tackled the school boards than the health boards, the radical centralizing of which may or may not advance anything.

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Image: Flickr/steveleenow
| December 9, 2014
Image: Flickr/jglsongs
| December 4, 2014
| November 30, 2014
| November 28, 2014
November 19, 2014 |
November 16-22, 2014, is Bullying Awareness and Prevention Week in Ontario. Schools across the province will undertake activities designed to heighten awareness of bullying.

Hundreds of Seneca College faculty to lose job security

Photo: flickr/Yanic Gendron

Hundreds of Seneca College teachers may lose their jobs or have them downgraded to non-union positions this January.

As the college proceeds with cuts, hundreds of "partial load" unionized jobs will be replaced with non-unionized part-time positions. Part-time faculty do not have office hours, are not paid for student contact time, and often work two or three jobs to make ends meet.

"English and liberal studies have been especially hard hit," said OPSEU Local 560 President Jonathan Singer, "but there are drastic cuts across the board."

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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| November 2, 2014
Asia Pacific Currents

Deregulation of New Zealand's education sector

November 1, 2014
| Labour news from the Asia Pacific region, including extended commentary on Iraq and an interview about deregulation of education in New Zealand.
Length: 25:25 minutes (11.64 MB)
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