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The struggle for education in Haiti

How one Haitian school is trying to help its students and teachers.
The story of how one Haitian school is trying to help its students and teachers, and what it represents for the rest of the country.

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The struggle for education in Haiti

A photo in SOPUDEP's school office of a kindergarten student who died in the earthquake.  Affectionately known as "Préval" because of a family connection to the country's president, she was one of 28 students who died. All photos: Darren Ell

Following the Jan. 12 earthquake, 1,263 out of 4,716 schools in western Haiti were destroyed and another 2,541 were damaged; 376,000 students were out of school and an unknown number of teachers and students were dead or wounded. 

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War on public schools rages

The Fraser Institute's school report-card program is merely the opening salvo in a campaign to strip public education of its funding and direct the resources to the private and nonprofit sectors.

Every year the institute spends hundreds of thousands of dollars to compile and disseminate its rankings of elementary and secondary schools. It has undreamed-of support from corporate media, which turn over dozens of pages each year for school rankings in the Vancouver Sun, Calgary Herald, Edmonton Sun, Toronto Sun, Ottawa Citizen, Windsor Star, and Quebec newsmagazine L'Actualité.

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The tragedy of the First Nations University of Canada

The campus of the First Nations University of Canada. Photo: Stephen LaRose.
Opened with high hopes and fanfare as a college 34 years ago, the institution that became the FNUC has seen five years of troubles that will hurt its students more than anyone else.

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The tragedy of the First Nations University of Canada

Participants at FNUC's annual pow-wow, March 28 at the Brandt Centre, Regina. Photo: Stephen LaRose.

Given all that's happened over the past five years, it's amazing anybody can still find the time and energy to party. But as the First Nations University of Canada took over Regina's Brandt Centre on the last weekend of March for its annual pow-wow, it was almost possible to avoid thinking about the academic institution's future.

Steven Swan, a member of FNUC's student council, mans an information booth, during what's probably been the most relaxing time he's had during the last semester. That's not saying much, since the council has been an innocent casualty of one of the biggest operational crises in Canadian academic history.

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We've been attacked for views we don't hold

On March 23, 16 University of Regina professors, including us, signed a letter to our president, Dr. Vianne Timmons, asking that she review her decision to join the U of R to "Project Hero."

We wrote: "In our view, support for ‘Project Hero' represents a dangerous cultural turn. It associates ‘heroism' with the act of military intervention. It erases the space for critical discussion of military policy and practices."

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MakerCulture: Edupunks of the world unite!

MakerCulture: Edupunks of the world unite!

One night in 2008 at a Brooklyn bar, a drunk Jim Groom coined a term that has changed the way the world looks at education.

The word is EduPunk and it sums up the need for educational reform -- reform that, to some extent, has already begun.

Ordinary people are taking their education into their own hands. Using Web 2.0 tools they have a world of knowledge. And classrooms, lectures, and curriculums are changing, dramatically.

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Underfunding under the guise of 'affordability' in B.C.

Photo: BC Gov Photos/flickr
Affordability is becoming the new buzzword of the B.C. government. But what does affordability mean for a provincial government? And what are the consequences of not investing in education and health?

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Photo: BC Gov Photos/flickr
| August 14, 2014

Leveraging public universities into private profit

In the past 40 years, Boards of Governors and Presidencies at Canadian universities have been stacked with members of the corporate elite, transforming public schools into private corporations.

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