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Needs No Introduction

Lawrence Hill on his novel, 'The Illegal'

October 18, 2016
| From Octopus Books in Ottawa, author and journalist Waubgeshig Rice talks to Lawrence Hill about his novel "The Illegal."
Length: 53:51 minutes (56.52 MB)

A heavy tale lightly told: Mona Awad's '13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl'

13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl

by Mona Awad
(Penguin Random House,
2016;
$16.00)

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The revolution will be led by women with wooden legs

In the Land of Two-Legged Women

by Huey Helene Alcaro
(Inanna Publications,
2016;
$22.95)

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"They were going to cut off her leg."

Huey Helene Alcaro's debut novel In the Land of Two Legged Women begins with this terrifying pronouncement.

"It was a blue and golden day, so beautiful it hurt and they were going to saw off her leg."

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Columnists

Storytelling and the hype of hyperfiction

Photo: Wayne MacPhail

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Here's a question: Can technology change the fundamental nature of story? I ask because a recent publishing experiment by Google suggests it can. I'm skeptical.

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'Between the Cracks She Fell' explores urban landscapes and the ghosts that haunt us

Between the Cracks She Fell

by Lisa de Nikolits
(Inanna Publications,
2015;
$22.95)

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Cities are palimpsests. Like those washed-off scrolls ready to be reused by a scribe, the words that came before leaving spectral impressions on the page, cities are built, unbuilt and rebuilt, leaving behind evidence of lives lived and left. In this way, time is made circular, existing on top of itself. It is no wonder, then, that in such spaces we should encounter the ghosts of those who came before us and those who might come after.

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'The Butterfly Prison' reignites hope for a better, more just world

The Butterfly Prison

by Tamara Pearson
(Open Books,
2015;
$20.65)

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Tamara Pearson is an independent left journalist from Australia who writes about Latin America. Her novel, The Butterfly Prison, set in Sydney, weaves together three different threads. In the following spoiler-filled review, I discuss each thread.

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Columnists

Sang Kim's literEATure nights imbued with kimchee memories

Sang with author Susan Swan. Photo: Justin Lauzon

Kimchee, the spicy Korean delicacy of fermented cabbage and assorted veggies, and Chef Boyardee, hold divergent yet profound influences in the life of writer and restauranteur Sang Kim, who runs the Windup Bird Cafe in downtown Toronto.

"I actually thought Chef Boyardee was real," said Kim, whose childhood after coming to Canada with his parents from Korea in 1975 was marked by poverty, hardship and those red cans of ready-to-eat-meals. His parents' marriage dissolved in those early years as well.

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'Jewel of the Thames' dives into the mythos of Sherlock Holmes

Jewel of the Thames

by Angela Misri
(Fierce Ink Press,
2014;
$16.99)

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Do you have a young reader at home who craves an Arthur Conan Doyle style mystery story? Heck! Do you like young adult fiction with a strong female protagonist yourself?

Well, you need to read Jewel of the Thames by Angela Misri, which presents Portia Adams, a quick-witted young woman who inherits the legendary dectective Sherlock Holmes' dectective agency, and soon finds herself dreaming of solving crimes.

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Photo: jessica @ flickr/Flickr
| March 13, 2013

Rae Spoon's First Spring Grass Fire on finding (queer) time

First Spring Fire

by Rae Spoon
(Arsenal Pulp Press,
2012;
$14.95)

In his remarkable 2009 text, Cruising Utopia, José Esteban Muñoz fixates on the ways in which queer bodies exist outside of and subvert what he calls “straight time.” Straight time, for Muñoz, is what tells queers that “there is no future but the here and now of our everyday life.” It grounds the fragmentation, suppression, and elision of queer histories, and denies futurity to those not counted under the rubric of a “reproductive majoritarian heterosexuality.”

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