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Time to cooperate: A modest proposal for a progressive alliance on electoral reform

The two contests for the federal leadership, the NDP -- already started -- and the Liberal -- on hold -- give an opportunity to think political realignment in Canada.

These leadership races could be an opportunity for serious debate about proportional representation, to give every person an equal vote, and climate change, the most urgent issue humankind faces, and one where the majority in Parliament is at odds with the majority of Canadians.

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Moving forward on municipal voting reform in Toronto

Photo: D'Arcy Norman
We need to press voter equality and proportional representations at the municipal level.

Related rabble.ca story:

Is the time right to discuss electoral reform?

Photo: Roland Tanglao/flickr
The momentum is building towards a more democratic electoral system based on proportional representation. Can we seize this opportunity this election?

Related rabble.ca story:

Columnists

Will we seize the opportunity for electoral reform in this election?

Photo: Roland Tanglao/flickr

Perhaps the only thing more offensive than the way Stephen Harper has changed Canada is the fact he's done it without the support of anything approaching a majority of Canadians.

Under our "first-past-the-post" electoral system, it's possible to win control of Parliament and exercise enormous power over the country even with only a minority of voters actually voting for you. The democratic shortcomings of such a system have long been evident.

But the rise of Stephen Harper's Conservatives -- with their aggression, their willingness to flout democratic rules and traditions, their indifference to the interests of those who didn't vote for them -- has highlighted the danger of an over-empowered minority in an urgent new way.

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Harper's election reforms make voter suppression easier

Photo: Neal Jennings/flickr
In the name of clamping down on "voter fraud," the Conservatives have brought in election reforms that will actually make it easier for voter suppression to go undetected in the future.

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Columnists

Stage is set for more voter fraud in next election

Photo: Neal Jennings/flickr

If you're a low-level political operative, the conviction of Conservative party staffer Michael Sona for his role in the robocall scandal may well have deterred you from committing voter fraud in the future.

But if you're a high-level political operative, the outcome of Sona's trial probably left you emboldened.

With a federal election looming, the stage is set for more voter fraud. But this time there's very little chance we'll ever find out about it, due to changes the Conservatives have made in Canada's election laws.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Please keep in mind:

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Photo: Simon Fraser University - University Communications/flickr
| November 20, 2014
rabble.ca polls

What's the best way to get a progressive government in Canada in 2015?

How do we defeat Harper in the 2015 federal election? But, how do we also vote in a progressive government that people want?

Hmm, big questions, folks!

What's the best way to get a progressive government in Canada in 2015?

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Should there be mandatory voting in Canada?

Photo: flickr/Chris Yakimov

It's the last week of our supporter drive and boy, do we need you! Please help rabble.ca amplify democratic movements. Become a monthly supporter.

Let's face up to it. Making voting mandatory under the electoral system we have now would be like demanding that a student learn music on a keyboard that produces the intended note less than half the time -- and requires them to wait four years between keystrokes.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
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rabble.ca polls

What are your thoughts on the Ontario election?

The Ontario election is over and Kathleen Wynne's Liberals have a majority government. What are your thoughts on the Ontario election?

Choices

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