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| November 17, 2014
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Photo: Robert Hiscock/flickr
| November 19, 2013

New Brunswick: Tensions rise as anti-fracking protests dig in

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Tensions are rising at the Highway 126 anti-fracking camp near Elsipogtog First Nation in Kent County, New Brunswick (traditional regional name: the Wabanakik). With the total number of arrests climbing from 17 to 29 on Friday, National Aboriginal Day -- and the heat of last weekend's confrontation, which led to the hospitalization of a community member, still heavy in the air -- a sense of momentum is palpable.

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Conservatives bring austerity to Newfoundland and Labrador

Confederation Building in St. John's. (Photo: Mark Plummer)

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The government of Newfoundland and Labrador has continued to decline in popularity over the past few months and its latest budget faces low approval, recent polling suggests.

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Columnists

Atlantic Canada ready to lay democracy on Harper government

Photo: Wade Schriner/flickr

The Atlantic premiers did two big things at their meeting last weekend. They basically called the Harper government incompetent, having constructed labour market policies on the basis of "anecdotes" and no evidence.

And for the first time in more than a generation -- apart from Newfoundland's mercurial former premier, Danny Williams -- someone from these parts has said "boo" to the federal government.

Columnists

Harper's changing political fortune in Atlantic Canada

Photo: M. Rehemtulla/QUOI Media Group

Twice the same day recently I heard this, spoken in dismissive rage: "That idiot, Harper" and "that fool in Ottawa."

In my decades watching politics, I've found that tone of voice is more indicative of political fortune than either polls or rational argument.

One speaker was a fisherman, angry at ham-fisted fishery management reforms, the other a guy who fixes houses for sale and had just been told by his bank manager that uncertainty over EI changes made an already catastrophic real estate market in Western Nova Scotia even worse.

Both probably voted for Harper last time, and neither thinks much about politics -- the type of "Tim Horton's crowd" voter the Conservatives target.

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