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Pots and pans ring out against Charest

Manifestation Casserole - St Henri (Photo: Magdalena O! / flickr)
'Casseroles' are spreading beyond Quebec and across Canada, as solidarity for the student strike pours in from far and wide.

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The taming of Jean Charest

Jean Charest was an early critic of the newly majority Harper government for its 'we won, and we get to do what we want' attitude to opposition. Ironically, sadly and, ultimately, stupidly, not much later Charest went ahead and adopted a similar attitude himself when faced with student opposition to his proposed 75 per cent increases to tuition fees (over five years, since pushed up to 82 per cent over seven years).

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| May 25, 2012

Toronto rallies in solidarity with Quebec students

Toronto rallies in solidarity with Quebec students and against Bill 78, as part of a day of action marking 100 days of the student strike. 

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Accountability, transparency, democracy
| May 25, 2012

Spread the red square everywhere: Why solidarity with Quebec students is crucial

The Charest government has turned to repression to try to break the largest and longest student strike in Quebec history. Students had already endured heavy-handed policing, including hundreds of arrests and brutal attacks by riot cops on campuses and in the streets.

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New poll shows Quebec fed up with Charest.
| May 22, 2012

The red square of solidarity for Quebec students is spreading far and wide

Carré rouge pour l'éducation. (Photo: Photomaxmtl / flickr)
When Quebec students hit the streets in a massive rally Tuesday, they won't be alone. Solidarity is spreading and so is their symbol, the red square.

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Quebec students say Charest's authoritarian 'special law' will fail

The strike of post-secondary students in Quebec has taken a dramatic turn with the provincial government pushing through a special law to suspend the school year at strike-bound institutions and outlawing protest activity deemed disruptive of institutions not participating in the strike.

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Quebec government lock-out of students will only add 'fuel to the fire'

After 14 weeks of student strikes in Quebec, the provincial Liberals announced last night that they will introduce a law that would suspend the semesters at colleges and universities if striking students do not stop holding picket lines or enforcing strike votes.

Student representatives were fast to denounce the regulation, calling it a "lock-out" and saying it will only add "fuel to the fire."

"Tonight, the government spit in the face of a generation...We will remember how we were treated tonight for a long time," said Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois, co-spokesperson for the Enlarged Coalition of the Association for a Solidarity Among Student Unions (CLASSE), at a press conference.

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