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| February 9, 2015
February 9, 2015 |
The defining features of the Canadian economy during the NAFTA era have been slower GDP growth, a surge in corporate concentration and heightened income inequality.

Canada's inconvenient truth about Mexico

Photo: flickr/Stephen Harper

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Canadians love Mexico especially when crystalized ice on window panes trigger thoughts of sandy beach retreats from Canada's punishing winters. Over 1.9 million Canadians turn to Mexico as their getaway destination.

In Mexico, however, thousands are seeking refuge from poverty and the human rights crisis, most recently brought to the fore by the disappearance of 43 students from the Ayotzinapa teacher's college in Guerrero, Mexico.

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Photo: iwona_kellie/flickr
| January 27, 2015
January 23, 2015 |
The province of Newfoundland and Labrador announces that they won't be working with the federal government in the various ongoing trade agreements.
Redeye

Ten years of free trade in Central America

January 16, 2015
| The Central America Free Trade Agreement was ratified in 2005. Ten years later, most of the signatory countries are struggling with poverty, violence and increased emigration.
Length: 13:58 minutes (12.79 MB)
Columnists

8 reasons to be hopeful about the U.S.-China climate deal

Photo: South Bend Voice/flickr

Good timing.

Timing isn't everything but it sure helps. After the mid-term elections, the mood in climate circles was getting pretty grim. We faced the prospect of a Republican-dominated House and Senate overturning emission controls, ramming through Keystone XL and elevating a climate denier (James Inhofe) to chair of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. Already there was talk that upcoming UN climate negotiations were dead on arrival.

In this context, the U.S.-China climate deal is a badly needed piece of good news. It signals that Barack Obama is willing to expend political capital fighting for his climate legacy.

It makes it harder for Republicans to break Obama's promises.

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Canada loses to Mexico: Was Ford ever planning to invest in Windsor?

Photo: Shawn Micallef

After months of discussion with the Ontario and Federal governments, Ford Motor Co. has decided to take its engine investment elsewhere.

The global engine deal would have brought roughly $2 billion of investment to manufacture 1.5 and 1.6 Litre engines. It would also have created over 900 jobs and secured the future of engine manufacturing in Ontario for the next decade.

Speaking to CBC's Amanda Lang, Unifor president Jerry Dias explained that the contract was originally slated for Mexico, but that the Union and the province were hoping to bring the contract north.

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Image: Flickr/Mehr Demokratie
| October 28, 2014

The Canada-Honduras trade agreement: A stain on Canada

Photo: media coop

On October 1, 2014, Canada legally implemented a Free Trade Agreement with Honduras.

The Conservative government was joined in the House of Commons by the Liberal Party in supporting this measure. The NDP was the only official party in Parliament to oppose it.

In keeping with our long-standing approach, New Democrats oppose signing trade agreements with countries who commit widespread human rights abuses, practice anti-democratic behaviour and foster political violence. We believe that nations who do so should not be rewarded with preferential economic benefits. Rather, they should be required to demonstrate a commitment to meet international norms and make progress toward them as a pre-condition to receiving such advantages.

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