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Photo: flickr/ Stephen Harper
| October 1, 2015
Image: Flickr/Lorenzo Gaudenzi
| July 17, 2015

Free trade deals: Not sacred cows, mostly just bull

Photo: flickr/ B Garrett

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Trade did not begin when the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement was signed in 1989, and neither will it stop if the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) is not signed.

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Watch: When Canadian politicians use the F-word

The most dangerous word Canadian workers could hear? Free trade.

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Columnists

Chalk one up for democracy: U.S. wins victory over TPP trade deal

Photo: Stop FastTrack/flickr

A teenager who knows me too well says I'm obsessed with endlessly refighting the battle against free trade. That rings pathetically true. And now who wins a small victory over the ancient foe? Them. The U.S.! History is cruel.

It happened last week. President Barack Obama backed the latest in free trade, the Trans-Pacific Partnership -- or TPP. The august Senate backed him. But the House of Representatives, the elected body nearest the people, voted No. It took a savvy, impassioned, grassroots campaign to make that happen and even so, it's not over. Pro-free traders are already attempting a TPP resuscitation. Victories over free trade should be celebrated swiftly. But what explains even that hiccup?

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Redeye

Free trade agreements enshrine corporate rights

June 18, 2015
| When governments try to protect the environment or promote the local economy, free trade agreements allow companies to sue for billions of dollars for lost profits. Murray Dobbin explains how.
Length: 16:10 minutes (14.81 MB)
Columnists

Canada's auto strategy: Grovelling for crumbs in NAFTA's grim reality

Photo: BUICK REGAL/flickr

You could hear jaws dropping onto factory floors right across Ontario's auto belt last month. Export Development Canada (EDC) announced a $525-million loan to Volkswagen. The money was not to lure the company -- the world's largest automaker -- to Canada. To the contrary, we're helping finance Volkswagen's growth 4,000 kilometers away: with expanded factories in Mexico and Tennessee, and a new plant in Mexico (producing luxury Audis).

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Photo: DFATD | MAECD/flickr
| March 31, 2015
| February 9, 2015
February 9, 2015 |
The defining features of the Canadian economy during the NAFTA era have been slower GDP growth, a surge in corporate concentration and heightened income inequality.
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