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April 8, 2013 |
After four austerity budgets and lots of hide and seek, there are finally some answers about what services federal departments are going to cut.
Columnists

Drinking the financial hemlock: Balancing public budgets to enrich the financial sector

Photo: d.neuman/Flickr

It's budget season everywhere, and it's all about debt and deficits and the elusive quest to balance the beast, which can only be done, it is said, by cutting services or raising taxes.

The burden of interest charges -- on the same scale as health or education in most provincial budgets -- doesn't get questioned because interest is fixed by the gods according to divine law, retribution from which we can only escape through harsher and harsher penance.

Or is it? Let's chew on a couple of startling points.

Daniel Wilson

Is Stephen Harper trying to provoke a confrontation with First Nations?

| April 5, 2013
Karl Nerenberg

Budget 2013: Welcome to workfare for First Nations in Canada

| March 22, 2013
Lori Theresa Waller

Labour news this week: public service workers call out killer cuts; feds' budget lukewarm on jobs; pension plans overhauled

| March 22, 2013
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What's your reaction to the federal budget?

Choices

Little cause for workers to celebrate in federal budget

As expected, the federal Conservative government's budget for 2014-15, released Thursday, provided little in the way of new spending to improve employment in Canada. There is a few million here, a few million there for job training programs, but overall it is an austerity budget with very little direct job creation.

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Karl Nerenberg

Budget 2013: Smoke, mirrors and very few details

| March 22, 2013

'Economic inaction plan': Opposition, civil society groups hit out at Budget 2013

The 2013 Federal Budget was tabled in Parliament today by Finance Minister Jim Flaherty. The Harper government likes to call it an "Economic Action Plan," but many groups across Canada today are hitting out, saying this is another federal budget that does little or nothing to lessen the economic impact of austerity.  

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Book launch: 'The Great Revenue Robbery: How to Stop the Tax Cut Scam and Save Canada'

Monday, April 15, 2013 - 6:30pm - 8:30pm

Location

No One Writes to the Colonel
460 College Street,
Toronto
Canada
43° 39' 23.166" N, 79° 24' 30.3984" W

 

“This is a welcome critique of conventional economic wisdom. If you thought tax cuts would solve all of your problems, read The Great Revenue Robbery and think again.”
-Thomas Walkom, political columnist, Toronto Star

Join authors and organizers for the launch of
The Great Revenue Robbery: How to Stop the Tax Cut Scam and Save Canada

Edited by Richard Swift for the Canadians for Tax Fairness

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