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| October 8, 2014

Going to war without support from the Official Opposition

Photo: Jamie McCaffrey/flickr
The Conservative majority approve military support for the U.S.-led coalition, currently bombing the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. NDP, Liberals, Bloc and Green members are against it.

Related rabble.ca story:

Columnists

Partisan military intervention: A first for Canada

Photo: Jamie McCaffrey/flickr

Canada is going to war. That we know, and not enough more.

In voicing support for military intervention in Iraq and possibly Syria, the House of Commons divided along partisan lines. The Conservative majority approve military support for the U.S.-led coalition, currently bombing the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. New Democrats, Liberals, Bloc and Green members are against it.

In the past, Canada has not sent military into a war zone without support from the Official Opposition party in the House of Commons. In World Wars I and II, Korea, all UN missions, the first Iraq war (1993), Afghanistan, and Libya, Canadian military action had bipartisan support.  

Harper's Iraq war plan: Save people by killing them?

Photo: flickr/Stephen Harper

The Harper government's plan to send Canadian air power to help combat the Islamic State (IS) in Iraq, and possibly Syria, and for Canadian special forces to continue operating there is homicidal, won't achieve its supposed goals and needs to be opposed.

Legislation tabled by the federal government on October 3 says that "unless confronted with strong and direct force, the threat ISIL poses to international peace and security, including to Canadian communities, will continue to grow."

There is plenty of evidence to suggest that exactly the opposite is true.

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October 6, 2014 |
Despite fracking protests, the Harper government has publicly taken a hands-off approach and continues to point to the provinces and territories as the key decision makers for fracking projects.
Columnists

CETA: Putting corporations ahead of Canadians

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr

By sheer coincidence, the media has recently been filled with stories that reflect the parallel universes we seem to be living in. The first were the stories about the international climate summit and the huge climate march (and hundreds of smaller ones) that preceded it -- punctuated by the launch of Naomi Klein's powerful call-to-action book This Changes Everything: Capitalism versus the Climate adding to the power of the moment.

CETA: All power to the oil companies

Photo: flickr/Stephen Harper
Just as governments need to get deadly serious about reducing our dependence on fossil fuels, with CETA they are tying their own hands through new restrictions on their right to regulate.

Related rabble.ca story:

rabble.ca polls

What do you think about Harper's Iraq war plan?

Harper announced Friday that Canada is offering a six-month air combat mission, but no ground troops, to fight in the Mideast, according to the CBC.

What do you think about Harper's Iraq war plan announcement?

Choices

October 3, 2014 |
The federal government has only partially protected postal services in the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement. Why is this significant?
Columnists

There's more we need to know before going to war

Photo: AK Rockefeller/flickr

Stephen Harper's heritage minister, Shelly Glover, says the Islamic State "are people who are violent and brutal and they have decapitated journalists, they have raped and brutalized women. That is all we need to know…" in order to start bombing. With respect, let me suggest what else we might need to know.

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