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Human rights ignored in Omar Khadr's 13-year imprisonment

Those who value human rights, a fair judicial system and the rule of law, find it incomprehensible that Omar Khadr is still incarcerated. Soon he will again be turning to Canadian courts, which have so often, in his long struggle for justice, ruled in his favour.

In the next few months, a number of legal challenges finally could result in his freedom. With these cases on the horizon, every Canadian committed to basic tenets of justice and democracy is urged to help cover Khadr's mounting legal costs.

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Image: wikimedia commons
| February 10, 2015
Columnists

U.S. needs to close Guantanamo and give it back to Cuba

Photo: Stephen D. Melkisethian/flickr

This week marks the 13th anniversary of the arrival of the first post-9/11 prisoners to Guantanamo Bay, the most notorious prison on the planet. This grim anniversary, and the beginning of normalization of diplomatic relations between the U.S and Cuba, serves as a reminder that we need to permanently close the prison and return the land to its rightful owners, the Cuban people. It is time to put an end to this dark chapter of United States history.

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Philip Breedlove
| November 30, 2014
| May 23, 2014
| January 13, 2014
Dennis Edney
| November 19, 2013
Columnists

Science, ethics and torture

Image:  Lance Page / t r u t h o u t, Adapted From: bright-political / flickr

Growing up in Tunisia during the '80s and early '90s, I sometimes gleaned information from adults around me who whispered that the opponents of the regime -- first the Communists and then the Islamists -- were tortured in secret chambers where the services of a doctor were used, sadly, in an evil way.

People at that time said that the role of the doctor was to make sure that during the torture session, the prisoners are harmed severely but not enough to be killed. In a nutshell, the doctors were there to make sure that the torturers didn't send the prisoners to the "other world." Ignoring all the details around these stories, I felt horrified.

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Columnists

Nelson Mandela's life shines light on injustice in U.S.

Photo: Seth Anderson/flickr

As the world celebrates Nelson Mandela's 95th birthday, it is timely to reflect on his life, spent fighting for equality for people of colour who long suffered under South Africa's apartheid regime. Mandela was arrested in 1962, a year before Martin Luther King Jr. would give his "I Have a Dream" speech in Washington, D.C. After 27 years in prison, Mandela was released in 1990. Four years later, he would become the first democratically elected president of South Africa.

We should use Mandela's incredible life to shine a light on injustice in the United States, as George Zimmerman is acquitted of killing Trayvon Martin, and as a massive hunger strike envelops the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, where scores of men have been held without charge for more than a decade.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Redeye

Why Omar Khadr should be freed

April 22, 2013
| Last September, Omar Khadr was transferred from Guantanamo Bay to the Millhaven maximum security prison in Kingston. Omar Khadr was taken into custody as a child soldier in Afghanistan in 2002.
Length: 12:34 minutes (11.51 MB)
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