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Da Costa, black history and inclusiveness in Canada

I have high regard for President Barack Hussein Obama. His ascent to the presidency was a magnificent moment in history. As an African-American citizen with a Canadian family, it was a particularly poignant moment for me to actually have been in the U.S. to vote for him.

The Obama campaign for the presidency offered much to admire and learn from. But a very significant aspect of President Obama's victory was his vision for the United States, which was primarily one of inclusiveness. His plea was, and after his second State of the Union address essentially remains, that the fulfillment of a nation's destiny can only be achieved by harnessing the potential of all its people, not just a select few or elite. Whatever else his problems may be, we can learn a lot from this.

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Guest in a stolen house: On immigration, colonialism and Canada

Photo: flickr/vtgard

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I am a guest in a stolen house. I can sympathize with the victims, because a long time ago, my house was the scene of a crime as well.

Indigenous people in North America (and for that matter, Oceania) have suffered an unprecedented amount of discrimination, violence, silencing and long-reaching emotional and psychological damage. This violence has continually been denied by the white majority and protest has been stifled by governments and civilians alike.

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February 13, 2015 |
A student shouldn't have to wait for a specific day or month to celebrate and find empowerment in the freedom to be who they are.

Celebrating the victories and struggles of Black workers in Canada

Photo: flickr/Rebel Sage
This February, the Congress of Union Retirees of Canada (CURC), alongside the Canadian labour movement, marks Black History Month.

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Marking the victories and struggles of Black workers in Canada

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The Congress of Union Retirees of Canada (CURC), alongside the Canadian labour movement, celebrates February 2015 as Black History Month.

Black History Month began in the United States as "Negro History Week" in February 1926 through the work of African-American scholar Dr. Carter G. Woodson. 

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February 4, 2015 |
This year, Black History Month comes at a critical moment for human rights and equality in North America.

You have no idea what Martin Luther King did. True or False?

Photo: wikimedia commons

This will be a very short diary. It will not contain any links or any scholarly references. It is about a very narrow topic, from a very personal, subjective perspective.

The topic at hand is what Martin Luther King actually did, what it was that he actually accomplished.  

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