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Lincoln, Marx and the struggle against slavery

An Unfinished Revolution: Karl Marx and Abraham Lincoln

by By Robin Blackburn
(Verso Press,
2011;
$19.95)

Marx did not support the North because he believed that its victory would directly lead to socialism. Rather, he saw in South and North two species of capitalism — one allowing slavery, the other not. The then existing regime of American society and economy embraced the enslavement of four million people whose enforced toil produced the republic’s most valuable export, cotton, as well as much tobacco, sugar, rice, and turpentine. Defeating the slave power was going to be difficult. The wealth and pride of the 300,000 slaveholders (there were actually 395,000 slave owners, according to the 1860 Census, but at the time Marx was writing this had not yet been published) was at stake.

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Beautiful Trouble: Murray Dobbin reviews new book looking at creative tools for social change

rabble senior contributing editor, Murray Dobbin, reviews Murray Dobbin reviews a new book looking at creative tools for social change

Related rabble.ca story:

2011's best in rabble book lounge reviews

Various

by various
(various,
2011;
N/A)

It's been a busy year in the lounge! This year's highlights include comedy for contrarians, vegan dieting, dissent deconstructed, revolutionary memoirs and books that undermine Harper's omnibus crime bill.

Here is a month by month look at rabble's top reviews from 2011. Click the book titles to view the full review.

January

Harper's Team by Tom Flanagan

Harperland by Lawrence Martin

Reviewed by Am Johal

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'Tis the season for lefty reading

Tropic of Chaos

Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence

by Christian Parenti
(Nation Books,
2011;
$30.00)

If there's one thing I enjoy about the frenzy of hyper-commercialism that accompanies the Christmas holiday season, it's the excuse it provides to shop for books. For those lucky enough to have some time off, it is also the ideal season to read -- or at least to make an ambitious reading list for 2012 as a New Year's resolution.

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| November 29, 2011

Organize. It's worth it

G20 inquiry rally, July 1, 2010. Photo: My Toronto Democracy/Flickr
Book lounge: Come hell or high water, we won't stop...

Related rabble.ca story:

Our story: rabble's book lounge launches in 70s style

On April 18, 2011, rabble celebrated its 10th anniversary. Highlighting 10 important moments of rabble's history over the course of our 10th year, current and former people involved with rabble have been asked to share their personal highlights from their time with rabble. This monthly rabble history series elaborates on some of the most common highlights submitted. The first piece published on our birthday appears here.

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Complicating the Arctic

An inukshuk in Nunavut. Photo: jumpyjoad/Flickr
Book review: Polar Imperative by Shelagh D. Grant

Related rabble.ca story:

2010's best in rabble reviews

various

by rabble staff
(various,
2010;
N/A)

A look back at the books reviewed in rabble's book lounge this past year reveals that it has been a diverse year for progressive books. Topics covered included poetry by and for activists, radical economics, environmental activism and foodscapes to community resistance in New Orleans, Gaza and the media. Here is a month by month look at rabble's top reviews from 2010. Click the book titles to view the full review.

January

The Making of an Elder Culture: Reflections on the Future of America's Most Audacious Generation by Theodore Roszak

Reviewed by Frank Preyde

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radio book lounge

Episode 30 - Sandy Pool on writing, poetry and Exploding into Night

December 16, 2010
| Cara Waterfall speaks to Pool about her first book Exploding into Night.
Length: 36:43
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