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| February 9, 2015

How many Canadians don't feel financially secure? A lot.

Photo: Prentiss Riddle/flickr
Hennessy's Index looks at appeal of middle-class economics at a time when 90 per cent of Canadians don't feel financially secure.

Related rabble.ca story:

Columnists

A number is never just a number: The appeal of middle-class economics

Photo: Prentiss Riddle/flickr

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52%

Percentage of Canadians who self-identify as middle class when asked to describe their "social and financial place in society," according to a November 2014 Pollara poll.

73%

Percentage of Quebecers who said they were middle class -- the province most likely to do so, followed by Alberta (57%), the Prairies (47%), B.C. (46%), Atlantic provinces (44%), and Ontario (43%).

57%

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Image: Flickr/dumfstar
| January 30, 2015
Photo: akahawkeyefan/flickr
| January 29, 2015
Columnists

Downsizing democracy: The end of the world as we know it?

Photo: Charlie Owen/flickr

If you are searching for significant anniversaries for 2015 one that you might find illuminating is the publication of a book published 40 years ago entitled The Crisis of Democracy. The title would seem fitting today but that's not the crisis its authors had in mind. It was commissioned by a new international boys' club of finance capitalists, CEOs, senior political figures (retired and active) and academics from Europe, North America and Japan.

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Columnists

'Imagine something different': Obama confronts inequality in State of the Union address

Photo: NASA/flickr/Bill Ingalls

"Imagine if we did something different."

Those were just seven words out of close to 7,000 that President Barack Obama spoke during his State of the Union address. He was addressing both houses of Congress, which are controlled by his bitter foes. Most importantly, though, he was addressing the country. Obama employed characteristically soaring rhetoric to deliver his message of bipartisanship. "The shadow of crisis has passed, and the State of the Union is strong," he assured us.

From whose lives has the shadow of crisis passed? And for whom is this Union strong?

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Photo: Jjackunrau/flickr
| January 5, 2015
| December 19, 2014
| December 19, 2014
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