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Documentary director Amar Wala on 'The Secret Trial 5,' Bill C-51, and the stigma of terror suspicion

March 17, 2015
| An interview with Amar Wala, director of the award-winning documentary The Secret Trial 5, which takes a critical look at Canada's security certificate regime. #ST5film
Length: 17:26 minutes (23.96 MB)
Columnists

Ten years after the Arar Inquiry, what has changed?

Photo: Jamie McCaffrey/flickr

This column is adapted from a speech delivered by Monia Mazigh at the conference "Arar+10: National Security and Human Rights a Decade Later" on October 29, 2014.

Let me start with a quote from George Bernard Shaw. The Irish playwright once said:

"Success does not consist in never making mistakes but in never making the same one a second time."

The Arar+10 conference is important for three main reasons.

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Photo: Blackfish
| June 27, 2014
Columnists

Productive week for Canada's desk torturers in Harkat, Diab cases

Photo: Mike Gifford/flickr

Two judicial decisions released last week remind us that the concept of national security is incompatible with democracy: the former almost always trumps the latter, and various enemies-du-jour are regularly created and then served up on the altar of "security." In each instance, profoundly disturbing decisions were dealt to Mohamed Harkat, facing deportation to torture in Algeria based on secret hearsay, and Hassan Diab, facing extradition to France on clearly trumped up allegations likely gleaned from torture.

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Harkat ruling is serious blow to human rights in Canada

The Supreme Court decision Wednesday to uphold the Security Certificate process is devastating news for Mohamed Harkat and a serious blow to human rights in Canada.

Related rabble.ca story:

Photo: Mike Alexander/flickr
| May 15, 2014

Canada's secret trials. They're not so secret anymore.

photo: secret trial 5
A new documentary called The Secret Trial 5 pulls back the curtain on Canada's security certificate system, on the eve of a Supreme Court ruling.

Related rabble.ca story:

photo: Secret Trial 5
| April 25, 2014

Secret evidence plays growing role in Canada’s immigration courts

Photo: flickr/Takver

Gossip and rumour based on secret intelligence sources may be all that is needed to deport a foreign national from Canada on national security grounds, legal experts say. 

Secret evidence has been used "in a whole range of immigration procedures," such as applications for permanent residence or citizenship in Canada, "which do not involve actual hearings but are simply administrative procedures," says Sharryn Aiken, a Queen’s University law professor and immigration and refugee expert.

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Columnists

Supreme Court's secret hearing and Judge Nadon's Charter dismissal

Photo: wyliepoon/flickr

Just before Thanksgiving, the Supreme Court of Canada held two days of hearings regarding the fate of Mohamed Harkat, detained in prison and under house arrest for over a decade by a secret trial security certificate, the reasons for which he has never been allowed to know and challenge. October 10 was a public hearing that he could attend, while October 11 was one he was not invited to, nor were his lawyers, the media, or the public. In fact, the eight judges of the Supreme Court disappeared to hold a secret hearing somewhere in Canada.

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