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Maude Barlow: Fall 2015 will be a watershed election

May 19, 2015
| Maude Barlow believes Stephen Harper will be gone after the next election, as long as people mobilize to vote him out. She tells a Vancouver audience why the Conservatives have to go.
Length: 11:13 minutes (10.27 MB)
Photo: flickr/ Obert Madondo
| May 7, 2015
Photo: flickr/Jamie McCaffrey
| April 20, 2015
| April 14, 2015
| April 11, 2015
| March 7, 2015
| March 3, 2015
February 27, 2015 |
After the Conservatives orchestrated widespread electoral fraud against voters in the 2011 election their legal bills from the court challenge are being paid by taxpayers.

How Stephen Harper holds his own

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr

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By now Stephen Harper should be down to the low teens in popularity, in territory last occupied when Conservative Prime Minister Brian Mulroney was at 11 per cent, just before he decided to leave politics in 1993.

Yes, 60 per cent of Canadians disapprove of Harper as a leader say EKOS Politics. But an astonishing 50 per cent think the Harper government has the country going in the right direction.


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Harper vs. Canada: Five Ways of Looking at the Conservative Regime

The new book by rabble's Parliamentary reporter, Karl Nerenberg, shares insight into the often opaque workings of Harper's Parliament.

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