Nick Fillmore

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Mr. Fillmore, formerly was an editor and producer with the CBC for 18 years, which included the position of Canadian Desk Editor at The National TV News, and head of an investigative journalism unit at CBC Radio’s Sunday Morning program. He’s a former member of the THIS Magazine Editorial Board, a regular contributor to The Globe and Mail from the Maritimes, and a former staff member with Reuters in London. Nick is a founding member of the Canadian Association of Journalists (CAJ) and Canadian Journalists for Free Expression (CJFE). He’s now a freelance journalist and media fundraiser based in Toronto. He can be reached at: fillmore0274@rogers.com

A coffee table display for the rich: The Globe and Mail

The new tarted-up, glossy, all-colour Globe and Mail is many things, but it is not a real "news paper."

It has been "dumbed up" and robbed of much of its news content.

The result is a hybrid never before seen in North America. It is some of the old Globe of course. But is also part Maclean's magazine and The Economist. It is part National Geographic, Sporting News, Vanity Fair, and Women's Wear Daily.

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Conference pulls together public media support

Canada's for-profit mainstream media is in a state of crisis and failing to meet the country's needs, several concerned media critics told of a conference aimed at promoting alternative independent public media last week:

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Tackling Flaherty's legacy: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Photo: flickr/Stephen Harper

The unexpected, shocking death of Jim Flaherty, the Conservative Party's only Finance Minister until his retirement less than a month ago, has resulted in hundreds of warm tributes for his commitment to public life and praise from those in business and conservative circles who approved of his financial and economic policies.

Flaherty, who was only 64, died of a heart attack on April 10. He was devoted to his family and was one of the most popular Members of Parliament. Friends indicated that Flaherty was headed for a high-paying job on Bay Street, so he could make a better income after he had sacrificed by taking a lower paying government job.

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Does Earth Hour actually produce environmental change?

Photo: flickr/Chuck Lee

It is one of the highest profile environmental events of the year. The lights plunged into darkness on the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Sydney's Opera House, the Kremlin in Moscow and even the world's tallest building, Dubai's 200-storey Burj Khalifa.

Last Saturday evening, organizers claimed that millions of people around the world recognized the threat to the world's environment by taking part in Earth Hour, shutting off the lights in giant buildings and in their homes.

Earth Hour has become a motherhood event in most parts of the developed world but, as with many perceived progressive activities, there are questions about how much it accomplishes and whether it is a productive event.

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How to protect yourself from your bank

Photo: flickr/Antana

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Back in 2006, into 2007, too-big-to-fail superbanks, complacent governments and boosterish business media ignored the few economists who predicted there would be a financial crisis. Today, governments lack the will or the legal weapons to control the greed endemic to elite bank culture.

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Who should pay for the bankers' mistakes?

Photo: flickr/Images Money

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When the next big financial crisis hits the world economy and Canadian banks are in distress -- as they were during the 2008 financial crisis -- the bank-using public will have plenty to worry about.

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Big banks continue gambling with our financial security

Photo: flickr/Ken Lund

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This is the fourth installment of an investigative series looking at the safety and conduct of Canadian banks. Please read part onepart two and part three.

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How corporate greed and corruption could lead us to another crash

Photo: flickr/Quinn Dombrowski

This is the third installment of an investigative series looking at the safety and conduct of Canadian banks. Please read part one and part two.

Are you ready for the Western world's economy to crash -- again?

More banks will go under. Many tens of thousands of people will again be thrown out of work. Billions of dollars in "investments" will disappear into thin air.

I believe it's not a question of "if" financial markets and the economy will crash again, but "when."

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Big banks continue to run the (risky) show

Photo: flickr/Joe Schueller

Giant banks are the most powerful institutions in in the world -- in many ways as powerful economically and politically as the biggest governments. Unfortunately, the banks frequently use their power in ways that damage the economy and hurt folks living around the world.

Two prominent research projects carried out in recent years paint a picture of a ruthless banking and financial sector powerful enough to dictate the nature of key parts of the world’s economy and challenge the strongest politicians.

Research carried out by three Swiss economists reveals the links and structure the giant financial institutions dominate and use to their advantage.

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Don't believe the hype, Canada's banks can't weather another recession

Photo: flickr/Francisco Diez

Canada’s economy has been feeling almost festive lately. Not so long ago it was very different, as the world weathered an economic crisis brought on mainly by misconduct in the financial industry. Do better times mean the banks have learned their lessons? Not hardly, veteran investigative journalist Nick Fillmore finds, in a six-part series of hard-hitting reports.

If Canada’s banking regulations are not substantially toughened by the time the next global financial crisis hits -- yes, there will be another crisis -- our Big Six banks may very well find themselves in serious trouble. Again.

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