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Not Rex: Adios Aveos

Photo: Not Rex
Employees of Aveos were left holding the bag after the company shut down last week.

Related rabble.ca story:

Workers at Ottawa's Salvation Army shelter ask for a living wage

Photo: PSAC-NCR | AFPC-RCN/Flickr
Workers at Ottawa's Salvation Army shelter say it is increasingly difficult to work for poverty wages.

Related rabble.ca story:

Photo: Michael Coghlan/flickr
| October 31, 2014
Photo: Toby Scott/flickr
| September 16, 2014
Source: CANSIM 281-0027
| September 16, 2014
Photo: Sharon Drummond/flickr
| September 10, 2014

Labour Day

Labour Day (or fête du travail) is celebrated on the first Monday of September. The day is often marked with parades, protests and reminders of the continued struggles of workers for fair wages, decent hours and safe working conditions.

Canada’s first Labour Day event was way back in 1872. As mechanized labour started to sweep the country with the Industrial Revolution, workers were increasingly easier to replace with machines. The fear of losing their jobs often kept workers in unsafe workplaces, working excessive hours for very little pay. At this time, Canada was still operating under archaic British laws which made unions illegal and had already been abolished in Britain.

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Columnists

Then and now: Shining a light on labour struggles

On travels this summer, I went to Rochester, NY, which was the home of the Eastman Kodak operation. I visited the Eastman Museum which featured a large exhibit of the photographs of Lewis Hine. While you may not immediately recognize his name, you likely have seen his iconic photographs, especially those dealing with child labour. Life magazine deemed his photograph of the Pennsylvanian breaker boys to be one of the "100 photographs that changed the world." His photographs of young girls working in cotton mills still have the power to move your heart a century later.

What issues are most important to labour leaders this Ontario election?

With the Ontario election around the corner, we want to know what issues labour leaders are most concerned about!

Check out this video to hear what issues are affecting workers' rights.

Fighting for garment workers' rights in the wake of Rana Plaza

Photo: Randy Kitts

Kalpona Akter was 12 when she went to work in one of Bangladesh's garment factories. She worked almost all day, only taking breaks to sleep in the factory. 

One day, a fire broke out several floors down from the one she was working on. Her boss wouldn't let her leave at first, claiming that the fire wouldn't spread to other floors. After an hour, they finally opened a staircase -- only one, because management was scared that the employees would steal the clothes they were making. 

Enraged by what she saw, she eventually turned her anger into passion and organizing. She was the head of Bangladesh Center for Worker Solidarity by the time the collapse of Rana Plaza in Savar would make the news. 

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