LGBTQSyndicate content

How potatoes and polar bears can teach kids about human rights

The Two Two-Eyed Potatoes

by Dustin Milligan
(DC Canada Education Publishing,
2014;
$11.95)

How do spuds choose their best friends?

In the children's book, The Two Two-Eyed Potatoes, Dustin Milligan uses fictional characters and events to answer this question.

At the Abegweit Warehouse, all potatoes follow the rule that spuds must only be best friends with taters having a different number of eyes from each other -- opposite and never equal! Any potatoes who dare break this rule end up becoming curly cut fries.

However, when Taylor meets Jordan, the two two-eyed potatoes immediately hit it off. Afraid of punishment, they avoid meeting each other only to end up depressed and lonely.

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.

LGBTQ youth have their voices heard

We Are The Youth

by Laurel Golio, Diana Scholl
(Space-Made,
2014;
$19.99)

When you were young, did you ever feel invisible? Probably. 

The photo journalism project, We Are the Youth, takes aim and addresses this quinessential youth feeling and specifically address the lack of visibility for LGBTQ youth.

This new book is a culmination of numerous interviews and photos by childhood friends and Brooklyn-based artists Laurel Golio and Diana Scholl where youth are able to share their stories with their own voices. Focusing mostly on the U.S., the project aims to become more geographically diverse as it expands.

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
| April 22, 2014
The Swan Song

The (sexual) identity crisis

April 21, 2014
| Remy Nassar, President of Helm, a Montreal Lebanese gay rights group, shares his story about growing up as a sexually confused gay adolescent in the conservative country of Lebanon.
Length: 27:21 minutes (25.05 MB)

'A Family by Any Other Name' explores queer relationships

A Family by Any Other Name

by Edited by Bruce Gillespie
(TouchWood Editions,
2014;
$19.95)

What does "family" mean to you? The new anthology, A Family by Any Other Name, asks this question and focuses on the perspectives of queer relationships and families. These personal essays discuss stories on coming out, same-sex marriage, adopting, having biological kids, polyamorous relationships, families without kids, divorce and dealing with the death of a spouse, as well as essays by straight writers about having a gay parent or child. 

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
gay comic
| January 30, 2014
But I'm a Cheerleader
| January 7, 2014
| December 3, 2013
face2face

Deirdre Pike

October 30, 2013
| Don't miss this interview as Deirdre talks about her passion for social justice, growing up in a small town as a Lesbian, how she still loves Jesus, and wants to out a whole lot of conversations.
Length: 45:40 minutes (62.73 MB)
Columnists

Acts of gaiety, acts of assimilation

Source: University of Michigan Press

Sexual liberation was a core principle of the social movements of the 1960s. The desire to emancipate desire was central to the belief that a new society and a new experience could be created. The United States' LGBTQ (lesbian/gay/bisexual/trans/queer) movements are often described as having begun with the Stonewall Revolt in Greenwich Village in New York City. The rebellion consisted of hundreds of gays resisting a police raid over the course of three days. In The Power of Identity, the sociologist Manuel Castells notes that there were 50 organizations for sexual minorities throughout the U.S.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Syndicate content