LGBTQSyndicate content

Trans Pacific Partnership patent rules could threaten LGBT lives

Photo: flickr/ e-Magine Art

Chip in to keep stories like these coming.

Countries that pride themselves on their human rights records, particularly for LGBT people, are endangering lives through patent rule changes in the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP).

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Talking Radical Radio

Reconciling queerness and faith at the Human RITES Conference

June 24, 2015
| Kim Holmes-Younger and Pam Rocker talk about a Calgary conference that brought people from multiple faiths together to discuss LGBTQ experiences of religion.
Length: 28:43 minutes (26.3 MB)

How potatoes and polar bears can teach kids about human rights

The Two Two-Eyed Potatoes

by Dustin Milligan
(DC Canada Education Publishing,
2014;
$11.95)

How do spuds choose their best friends?

In the children's book, The Two Two-Eyed Potatoes, Dustin Milligan uses fictional characters and events to answer this question.

At the Abegweit Warehouse, all potatoes follow the rule that spuds must only be best friends with taters having a different number of eyes from each other -- opposite and never equal! Any potatoes who dare break this rule end up becoming curly cut fries.

However, when Taylor meets Jordan, the two two-eyed potatoes immediately hit it off. Afraid of punishment, they avoid meeting each other only to end up depressed and lonely.

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.

LGBTQ youth have their voices heard

We Are The Youth

by Laurel Golio, Diana Scholl
(Space-Made,
2014;
$19.99)

When you were young, did you ever feel invisible? Probably. 

The photo journalism project, We Are the Youth, takes aim and addresses this quinessential youth feeling and specifically address the lack of visibility for LGBTQ youth.

This new book is a culmination of numerous interviews and photos by childhood friends and Brooklyn-based artists Laurel Golio and Diana Scholl where youth are able to share their stories with their own voices. Focusing mostly on the U.S., the project aims to become more geographically diverse as it expands.

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
| April 22, 2014
The Swan Song

The (sexual) identity crisis

April 21, 2014
| Remy Nassar, President of Helm, a Montreal Lebanese gay rights group, shares his story about growing up as a sexually confused gay adolescent in the conservative country of Lebanon.
Length: 27:21 minutes (25.05 MB)

'A Family by Any Other Name' explores queer relationships

A Family by Any Other Name

by Edited by Bruce Gillespie
(TouchWood Editions,
2014;
$19.95)

What does "family" mean to you? The new anthology, A Family by Any Other Name, asks this question and focuses on the perspectives of queer relationships and families. These personal essays discuss stories on coming out, same-sex marriage, adopting, having biological kids, polyamorous relationships, families without kids, divorce and dealing with the death of a spouse, as well as essays by straight writers about having a gay parent or child. 

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
gay comic
| January 30, 2014
But I'm a Cheerleader
| January 7, 2014
| December 3, 2013
Syndicate content