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Poland in the torture hot seat: Is Canada next?

Photo: European Court of Human Rights. Credit: marcella bona/flickr

A little-noticed European Court of Human Rights decision regarding Polish complicity in torture may well have ripple effects on this side of the Atlantic and, hopefully, produce some accountability in the Ottawa bunkers of CSIS, the RCMP, and the foreign affairs and justice bureaucracies. In addition, its precedent would be most useful in hauling some high-profile Liberals out of their comfortable retirement to inquire about their role in the CIA-led global kidnap and disappearance-to-torture regime that has marked much of the 21st century.

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June 13, 2014 |
Activists gathered to sign and mail letters to Stephen Harper and MPs demanding justice be restored to First Nations Children by providing them culturally based equity.
| June 9, 2014
| April 9, 2014
Redeye

Film: How A People Live

March 11, 2014
| The Nakwaxda'xw and Gwa'sala people were forcibly removed from their homelands in 1964. Now a new film by Lisa Jackson tells the story of their dislocation and of their fight to return.
Length: 22:23 minutes (20.5 MB)
Photo: flickr/wburris
| February 13, 2014

To our Anishinaabemowin teachers: We are listening

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Educator and spoken-word poet Taylor Mali often uses the term "Miracle Workers" to describe teachers. Speaking to this term, I couldn't agree more. Teachers are miracle workers who support us and assist us at unbelievably great lengths to help us reach for (and connect to) our futures and realize our dreams.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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'It's living and breathing in this generation': A conversation with Helen Haig-Brown

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Helen Haig-Brown is an award-winning documentary filmmaker from Williams Lake, B.C. She recently visited Kelowna as a Visiting Scholar at the University of British Columbia's Okanagan campus. We sat down in an airport hotel restaurant to talk about Haig-Brown's artistry and her ongoing Legacy project. Despite the somewhat aseptic atmosphere of our meeting place, this Tsilhqot'in filmmaker had plenty to say about her work and its role in healing and reconciliation.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Justice Sinclair speaks about significance of the release of 4,000 names of Aboriginal children

Photo: flickr/David Stanley
The Vital Statistics Agency of BC recently supplied the names of all Aboriginal children who died between 1917 and 1956. We speak with Justice Murray Sinclair about the significance of this event.

Related rabble.ca story:

Redeye

B.C. hands over 4,000 names to the Missing Children project of the TRC

January 21, 2014
| The Vital Statistics Agency of B.C. recently supplied the names of all Aboriginal children who died between 1917 and 1956. We speak with Justice Murray Sinclair about the significance of this event.
Length: 16:26 minutes (15.06 MB)
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