Duncan Cameron

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Born in Victoria B.C. in 1944, Duncan now lives in Vancouver. Following graduation from the University of Alberta he joined the Department of Finance (Ottawa) in 1966 and was financial advisor to the Canadian Delegation at the United Nations General Assembly in 1967. After working at the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), he went on to complete a doctorate from the University of Paris I (Paris-Sorbonne) in 1976. Duncan is an adjunct professor of political science at Simon Fraser University, a director of the Karl Polanyi Institute of Political Economy at Concordia University in Montreal, and a research fellow of the Centre for Global Political Economy at SFU. He was a member of the political science department at the University of Ottawa from 1975 until 2004.He is the author, co-author, editor or coeditor of 11 books including Ethics and Economics (with Gregory Baum), The Other Macdonald Report (with Daniel Drache), The Free Trade Papers, The Free Trade Deal, Canada Under Free Trade (with Mel Watkins) and Constitutional Politics (with Miriam Smith).
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The efficient vote to #HeaveSteve

Photo: Andrew Bates/flickr

With less than five months to the next federal election (October 19 is the election date fixed by law), polling by EKOS Research confirms a tight three-way race is underway.

Current EOKS projections show the Conservatives losing their majority in the House of Commons, but winning the most seats.

There are enough Canadian voters who want to "heave Steve" to ensure a Conservative defeat … except that the Canadian electoral system makes votes for winning candidates efficient votes, and consigns votes for losing parties to the dustbin.

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The noble dream of Quebec independence has an unlikely new champion

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

The newly elected leader of the Parti Québécois, 53-year-old Pierre Karl Péladeau is on a mission: make Quebec an independent country, able to take its place in the family of nations.

PKP, as he is universally known within Quebec, is an unlikely champion of the noble dream of Quebec independence.

Born the rich inheritor of a  global printing empire, PKP has watched it contract under his stewardship, along with newspaper sales. With the approval of a previous PQ government, Péladeau became the dominant figure in Quebec cable distribution, when he added Videotron to Quebecor, the giant company with a worldwide reach which his his father had put together.

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Alberta rejects the Canadian legacy of tax injustice

Photo: Don Voaklander/flickr

Rachel Notley led the Alberta NDP to victory on May 6 calling for higher taxes on corporations to pay for more teachers and better health care. Interestingly, in 1990, Bob Rae led the Ontario NDP to victory pointing to corporations that paid no income tax.

The federal NDP is calling for higher corporate taxes, hoping it will become an election issue in October, a rallying point for Canadians fed up with the underfunding of health care, and other government services.

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Rachel Notley and the NDP stampede to victory in Alberta

Photo: flickr/ Dave Cournoyer
In Tuesday's Alberta election, Rachel Notley and the NDP stampeded into a majority victory, leaving Jim Prentice's PCs in the dust.

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Alberta is ready for Premier Rachel Notley

Photo: Don Voaklander/flickr

NDP Alberta election material headlined: "Rachel is ready." Now the verdict is clear: Alberta was ready for Rachel Notley to head an NDP majority government.

The Alberta NDP won 40 per cent of the vote and 54 seats, including 19 out of 19 in Edmonton.

The outgoing Progressive Conservatives finished third with 10 seats. Wildrose, the PC rival for the right-wing vote, will be the official opposition; it won 21 seats. The Alberta Party and the Liberals each won one seat.

The Jim Prentice PC party lost 58 of the 70 seats it held at dissolution of the legislature. Prentice, the fourth PC leader in four years, not only quit the leadership, he resigned his seat before being declared elected.

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A new public sector activism: PSAC takes Harper's bet and raises him

Photo: Roland Tanglao/flickr

The Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) opened its 17th triennial convention this week in Quebec City with a militant speech from National President Robyn Benson. PSAC is in the midst of bargaining with the Harper Conservatives. But, President Benson went beyond putting the Harper Conservatives on guard against breaking its word and overturning signed agreements.

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Trudeau says yes to Liberal-Conservative silent partnership

Photo: Adam Scotti/Justin Trudeau/flickr

With a federal election scheduled next October 19, the current outlook is that it will produce a minority parliament. While it is possible for either the NDP, the Conservatives, or the Liberals to win an outright majority, none of the three have been polling in majority territory.

Without a majority winner, the party that elects the most members of Parliament will be asked to form a government.

If the Conservatives win more of the 338 seats to be contested than any other party, Stephen Harper can stay on as prime minister -- unless the opposition parties chose to defeat his minority government on a motion of confidence. The earliest opportunity to do that would be the Speech from the Throne that opens a new session of parliament.

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Meeting Castro: Harper fails history, feigns support for democracy

Photo: OEA - OAS/flickr

Stephen Harper met Cuban President Raúl Castro at the Summit of the Americas in Panama City last weekend. Officials called it a "pull aside" to signify it was not a formal sit-down meeting, but the prime minister still described it as "a long and detailed" conversation.

If Stephen Harper has gotten his way, Cuba would still be uninvited to the regular get-togethers of heads of government, held under the auspices of the Organization of American States (OAS).

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The collapse of California: How to stop it and protect the planet

Photo: Ian Abbott/flickr

California is running out of water. According to NASA scientist Jay Famiglietti, reservoir water is depleted down to a one-year supply, and "strategic backup supply, groundwater, is rapidly disappearing."

Another American revolution is what is needed to handle the California water situation. As water shortages loom, the state is looking at a collapse of its social structure.

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Canada is acting outside the law

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr
Citizens are supposed to understand that by fighting ISIL, Canada is protecting itself from terrorist action. In reality, Canada is acting outside the law in a diplomatic and military fiasco.

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