Duncan Cameron

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Born in Victoria B.C. in 1944, Duncan now lives in Vancouver. Following graduation from the University of Alberta he joined the Department of Finance (Ottawa) in 1966 and was financial advisor to the Canadian Delegation at the United Nations General Assembly in 1967. After working at the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), he went on to complete a doctorate from the University of Paris I (Paris-Sorbonne) in 1976. Duncan is an adjunct professor of political science at Simon Fraser University, a director of the Karl Polanyi Institute of Political Economy at Concordia University in Montreal, and a research fellow of the Centre for Global Political Economy at SFU. He was a member of the political science department at the University of Ottawa from 1975 until 2004.He is the author, co-author, editor or coeditor of 11 books including Ethics and Economics (with Gregory Baum), The Other Macdonald Report (with Daniel Drache), The Free Trade Papers, The Free Trade Deal, Canada Under Free Trade (with Mel Watkins) and Constitutional Politics (with Miriam Smith).
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Waiting for the elephant to be mentioned in the 2015 election

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"We're paying [gas] prices similar to when oil was $100," Bruce Cran of the Consumers Association of Canada told Global News reporter Jamie Sturgeon in August, just as the election got underway.

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The subtext of election 2015: Beat the NDP

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The subtext of election 2015 is that the NDP could win the most seats in the next parliament, and the other contenders have turned against them.

After spending two-plus years and untold amounts of dollars telling Canadians that Justin Trudeau was Just Not Ready, the Conservatives discovered that the NDP were a major beneficiary of the negative advertising ordered up by Stephen Harper.

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The vote for change in election 2015

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Election 2015 has one overriding question: do you want to see another Harper Conservative government?

Two-thirds or more of Canadians are answering: no more Harper.

Some voter choices have already been made. Liberal or NDP partisans support their party and will vote for it. The same goes for Green Party or Bloc Québécois members.

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What will the next government do to fight recession?

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The Canadian economy slowed to a crawl and then stopped. Economists call six months of no growth a recession. Statistics Canada made it official last week. What the numbers do not reveal is the personal dramas, individual hardships, and pain inflicted on people: an economy in recession creates growing unemployment.

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Trudeau Liberals hunt for centre-right voters

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It has been a favourite election disaster scenario. Two centre-left parties fighting it out for the succession to Stephen Harper. While the Liberals and the NDP knock each other around, the centre-right Conservatives squeeze out another win.

That particular political story turns out to be overstated. Both the Liberals and the NDP are wooing the "middle class," building defensive positions against Conservative attacks, not trying to outdo each other in being "progressive."

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Cheat to win, the Harper electoral game plan

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Canada's 42nd federal election kicked off Sunday August 1 with a difference. This campaign will be about twice as long as usual before Canadians vote on October 19.

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A gang of wolves comes for Greece

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The election of an anti-austerity Syriza government in Greece signalled trouble for the powers-that-be in the European Union. Principally Germany which has no interest in rethinking how the EU operates, since it serves German interests so well, but also the most powerful European institution: the European Central Bank (ECB).

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Who profits from austerity?

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On Saturday, London rocked to the sounds of 250,000 marchers protesting austerity in the U.K. Organized by The People's Assembly Against Austerity, the day's events (marches were also held in Liverpool and Glasgow) announce the beginning of a campaign against the cutbacks to services by the Conservative government headed by David Cameron.

Recently returned to power with an unexpected majority, the Conservatives wants to resume the tight spending policies -- temporarily suspended in the run-up to the election -- that have worsened unemployment all over Europe.

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| June 23, 2015
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The spoiler: Gilles Duceppe returns as BQ leader

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With former leader Gilles Duceppe taking over the leadership of the Bloc Québécois (BQ) from Mario Beaulieu, the only party able to threaten the NDP in Quebec has raised its game.

The Trudeau Liberals have failed to gain traction in francophone Quebec; Conservative support has been limited to the Quebec City area; and the NDP looks comfortably ahead across Quebec, a position Duceppe wants to overturn.

NDP strength meant the BQ -- the party that won 49 per cent of the Quebec vote in 1993, and made Lucien Bouchard Leader of the Official Opposition in Ottawa -- was looking at being shut out in the upcoming October 19 federal election. 

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