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This week in labour: Some cringe-worthy Conservative gaffes and much, much, more!

Photo: Flickr;  Alex Guibord

This week's labour roundup is gleefully mean, because it starts with a couple of Harper facepalm-worthy mess-ups.

When it comes to omnibus bills and hidden agendas, it can be hard to explain just how and why this government isn't working for workers. But this week, they made it super easy! Thanks y'all!

 

 

Let's review, shall we?

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You don't need to spy to know what we think! Follow the #StopC51 protests here.

On May 30, the third installment of the Canada-wide protests to stop Bill C-51 will happen, with the national convergence occuring in Ottawa.

Find a local solidarity event in your community here.

Bill C-51 may have passed the House of Commons, but the fight is far from over.

Bill C-51 is a dangerous piece of legislation and a threat to our rights and freedoms. The Harper government must know its attempt to rush Bill C-51 through parliament is undemocratic and unacceptable.

Help build pressure on the Senate to stop this bill by contacting your senator(s) on social media or email: https://stopc51.ca/

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Ordered back to work, Ontario teachers say this labour dispute isn't over

Photo: Flickr/Emory Maiden

Teachers in Durham, Peel, and Sudbury's Rainbow school districts have been on strike for over three weeks. Yesterday, almost 70,000 high-school students went back to class, following a decision by the Ontario Labour Relations Board (OLRB).

While classes have resumed in the three striking school districts, the Ontario Secondary School Teachers Federation (OSSTF) says it won't be business as usual in Ontario high schools.

On Tuesday, just as the provincial government started the process of instituting back-to-work legislation, the OLRB rendered its decision, ruling that the three local strikes were, in fact, illegal.

Classes started up again on Wednesday.

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Report finds Kinder Morgan proposal violates First Nation legal principles

Photo: Flickr/Brent Granby

On May 26, the Sacred Trust, acting on behalf of the Tsleil-Waututh First Nation, released an 89-page Independent Assessment Report, about the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline. The comprehensive report, which incorporated the findings of six expert reports, conclusively opposes the pipeline proposal.

The proposal includes two pipelines and an expansion of the Westridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby. Kinder Morgan seeks to transport 890,000 barrels a day, in the two proposed pipelines between Edmonton and Burnaby. The terminal expansion would include an increase of traffic from 60 to 408 tankers per year.

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Did Canada hear its residential school survivors?

Photo: flickr/ Neeta Lind

Next week will mark the end of government funding to investigate the truth and impact of residential schools through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC). The TRC's goals were to educate Canadians about this dark part of our history and support the healing of residential school survivors.

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Art and life: Papineau's ex-Conservative MP candidate on why he fooled the Tories

Photo: Chris Papineau/twitter

Chris Lloyd's thumbs-up shot with Stephen Harper has been making rounds on the Internet, ever since the Conservative party asked him to resign when they found out his candidacy for MP in the Papineau riding was part of an art project.

His bid for office was short-lived -- his Conservative candidacy ended before the 2015 federal election was even called -- but his art project has something to say about the strata that separate politicians and people in Canada.

He has been working on his project, Dear PM, since 1998 when he was a student at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

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New study points to a new normal: Job insecurity.

Photo: flickr/Jef Safi

A new study released today confirms the broad ranging consequences of precarious labour in urban areas of southern Ontario.

In 2013, PEPSO, a research partnership between United Way Toronto and McMaster University conducted a major study on precarious labour in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton areas. Using data collected from a survey of over 4,000 workers and 28 in-depth interviews, The Precarity Penalty, released today, builds on those findings.

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This week in labour: The precarious workers edition

Photo: flickr/Matthias Ripp

Usually this roundup provides a sampling of the going-ons of organized labour across the country. But this week, there's been a lot of media attention given to precarious workers -- a growing group that's often much harder to organize. They are all around us: from the grocery store aisles to the newsroom, job insecurity is becoming the new normal for low- and middle-income earners across all demographics. So here's to the temp-agency-working, part-time, freelancing, contract folk. Sometimes you need the labour roundup love, too. 

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Precarious labour debated in Parliament

Photo: Andrew Cash

Andrew Cash wonders why there aren't any labour ballads about cashiers. Considering the changing nature of work in this country, the Davenport MP and former musician thinks we need some new tunes to match the times.

On Thursday, Members of the House of Commons had their first opportunity to debate the issue of precarious and freelance labour in Parliament. 

Bill C-542, the Urban Workers Strategy Act, was put forward as a private member's bill by Cash in 2013, and has now been submitted for its second reading in the House.

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How can a Canadian mining company sue El Salvador for $301 million?

Photo: Mining Justice Solidarity Network

Friday morning, a delegation of anti-mining activists, along with one in a kangaroo costume, made a visit to the Toronto office of Industry Canada and the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development. 

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