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Kinder Morgan would profit from oil spills. Really.

Kinder Morgan subsidiary Trans Mountain Pipeline (TMP) owns 50.9 per cent of the corporation that would respond to a marine oil spill in British Columbia, according to TMP's response to an information request.

The Western Canadian Marine Response Corporation (WCMRC) has four other shareholders: Imperial Oil, Shell Canada, Chevron and Suncor.

A spill would certainly mean business and revenue for the WCMRC.

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This week in labour: You'll be pleasantly surprised

Photo: Flickr/ Robin Dawes

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We've got some energizing victories and and momentous protests. Plus Canada Post's admission that it has been running an enormous budget surplus thanks in large part to mail delivery services. Throw in the fact that the Queen of England may have to brew her own tea if workers at Windsor Castle go on strike and, well, this week is just full of delightful surprise. Cheers!

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Federal government warns foreign workers going 'underground' is not an option

Photo: Flickr/Alex Guiford

The federal government has warned the thousands of temporary foreign workers (TFWs) whose work permits are expired yesterday, April 1, to comply with the new law by leaving the country or be dealt with accordingly.

"Let there be no mistake: We will not tolerate people going 'underground.' Flouting our immigration laws is not an option, and we will deal with offenders swiftly and fairly," said Immigration Minister Chris Alexander and Employment Minister Pierre Poilievre in a statement.

Four years ago, April 1, 2015 was set as the deadline for TFWs in low-skilled occupations to either become permanent residents or return to their home countries as a means to encourage employers to hire Canadians.

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Today, protests demand justice for Cindy Gladue. Follow them here.

Photo: flickr/Christopher Long

Today, there are demonstrations across Canada to express outrage at the verdict in the case of Cindy Gladue. For more information on joining the protest in your city, search Justice for Cindy Gladue on Facebook. You can follow the Twitter feed from the demonstrations across Canada here:

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Four reasons Quebec is on the streets fighting austerity

Night demonstrations -- a fixture in the 2012 Quebec student movement -- were held on Tuesday in Montreal and Quebec City, and again on Friday in Montreal, with thousands filling the streets as well as hundreds of armoured police.

The mobilization against austerity measures was met by strong police reaction. On Thursday of the same week, the Quebec Liberal government tabled a budget "balanced" by large cuts to education, health care and other social services spending.

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Ontario precarious workers 'Still Living on the Edge,' report

Photo: flickr/Jose Maria Cuellar

"Still Living on the Edge," a new report released today, finds that Ontario's employment laws are failing low-wage and precarious workers.

Forty per cent of Ontarians work 'non-standard jobs,' meaning part-time, temporary, or independent contract work, and 33 per cent work low-wage jobs. But, as the report shows, Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) has not adapted to protect the growing number of precarious workers in the province.

First written in the post-WWII prosperity era, Ontario's Employment Standard Act (ESA) assumes economic stability and a labour market dominated by full-time permanent jobs with employment benefits and steady wage increases. But those are not the times we live in.

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April 1 deadline looms for children of temporary foreign workers

Photo: flickr/Jeff Nelson

On April 1, 2015, new federal government rules will set the stage for the largest set of deportations in Canada's history. An estimated 70,000 temporary foreign workers whose contracts are expiring will either voluntarily leave Canada, be given deportation orders, or will continue living here without legal documents.

Ethel Tungohan interviewed temporary foreign workers about the impact the 4 & 4 rule will have on them and their families. All names in this piece have been changed to protect the interviewees.

 

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Migrant advocacy groups fight April 1 temporary foreign worker deportations

On April 1, 2015, an estimated 70,000 temporary foreign workers whose contracts are expiring will either voluntarily leave Canada, be given deportation orders, or will continue living here without legal documents. Based on the number of temporary foreign workers seeking assistance from settlement services agencies and migrant organizations, 16,000 temporary foreign workers in Alberta will lose status in Alberta, which migrant advocates stress is a conservative estimate.

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This week in labour: Conservative myth-busting and plenty of picket lines

Photo: OFL Communications

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There is a theme to this week's labour round-up -- or maybe there are two themes.

One has to do with the connected struggle between workers and students, and student-workers. From daycare to post-secondary, budgets are being squeezed, as are educators and students. A second, and related, theme is bad policy from public-sector spending to immigration to C-51.

Sorry, was is that too bleak? Happy weekend reading!

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Labour leader speaks out on Bill C-51 in Parliament

Image: People's Social Forum

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