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Apartners film delves into trend of committed couples living apart

Sharon and David

Filmmaker Sharon Hyman has a favourite line from one of the subjects of her film Apart♡ners: Living Happily Ever Apart.

"How can I miss you if you won't go away?" Hyman laughs over the phone.

The Montreal director -- whose previous film Neverbloomers examined the idea of adulthood and what it means -- is still in development with the documentary, which she hopes will be in production this September and on VOD and in theatrical release in 2015.

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Video: Don't Get My Valley Up! A rap from Stone Fence Theatre's new musical

Don't Get My Valley Up! -- the rap song used in the Act 1 finale of Stone Fence Theatre's new musical, G'day, We're from the Valley, EH!, which opens in Eganville July 22 and plays throughout the summer and fall in six Renfrew County locations. The rap is written by Ish Theilheimer and Chantal Elie-Sernoskie. Leads in video: Robin Pinkerton, Chantal Elie-Sernoskie and Ambrose Mullin. Information, scheduling and ticket purchases are all at the company's website, www.stonefence.ca . The video was shot and produced by Space Camp Collective, with recording by Robin Pinkerton.

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Columnists

A page from Rosemary Sexton's book shows diaries get closest to lived life

Home Before Dark book jacket

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I hardly know what to say about Rosemary Sexton's book, Home Before Dark, and that's a rare gift from an author. It's a rambling, riveting, often trivial diary of her life between 1998 and 2002. Why that span? No particular reason.

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Columnists

Building confidence in autistic teens through video games

Photo: Every1Games

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"It's about creativity," says Sarah Drew, who runs Every1Games, a company that provides a skills course in video game production activities along with social and professional development for teens with autism.

"Our participants want a chance to make something they can share."

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Talking Radical Radio

Radical arts, radical memory

June 11, 2014
| Stefan Christoff talks about the work with multiple cultural and artistic forms by the Howl! Arts Collective in Montreal as part of broader movements for radical social change.
Length: 28:28 minutes (26.07 MB)
face2face

Gabe Fajuri on cheating, deception and the history of magic

May 27, 2014
| Gabe is one of the most interesting people I know. He's a magician, auctioneer, writer, editor and publisher of books. He believes there are several types of people out there.
Length: 46:42 minutes (53.46 MB)

Indie Inside: Betty Malaise and the mushroom-souper

Betty Malaise and the mushroom-souper, experimental artists from the land of the living skies, consist of Joel Carignan, as the alchemist of sound production and Brandie Carignan, the poet-the-voice. Betty Malaise and the mushroom-souper believes that the highest forms of human expression can be found in music and feel this should be shared democratically in order to inspire others and keep the evolution of creation ever-revolving. Therefore, the artists stream their music and offer free downloads to all fans. 

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| May 18, 2014
Columnists

'Come Worry With Us!' a call to nurture, art and motherhood

Photo credit: Come Worry With Us!

Intuition is an instinct commonly attributed to both motherhood and the artistic process and it's what propelled award-winning director Helene Klodawsky into the world of Montreal musicians Jessica Moss and Efrim Menuck.

Klodawsky, married for 30 years with two children, was beguiled after a friend of hers was hired to be a "tour nanny" for Ezra, the couple's one-year-old child. That hunch, back in 2009, that something interesting would happen, led to her latest documentary Come Worry With Us!

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| April 22, 2014
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