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May Day 2016: Support protesters in Montreal

Montreal May Day

In 2015, police arrested 87 people, teargassed protestors and, punched Xavier Amodeo repeatedly while arresting him. Unsurprisingly, an internal police body decided against investigating the rough arrest and police actions.

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Questions surround timing of terrorism charges in Waterloo case

Photo: waferboard/flickr

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The unbearable lightness of Stéphane Dion

Photo: UN Geneva/flickr

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At the end of May, the Trudeau team and, specifically, its piffle of a global affairs minister, Stéphane Dion, will likely fail two significant foreign policy tests that will challenge their ability to comply with domestic and international law. One deals with an individual war criminal, while the other is a massive terrorism and torture trade show coming to Ottawa.

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The price of acceptance: Immigrants with disabilities in a system of disadvantage

Photo: flickr/antefixus21

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Over the last few weeks, we learned that Felipe Montoya and his family were denied permanent resident status in Canada because his child Nico is a person with Down Syndrome.

As community members and service providers who work to bring greater attention to the barriers and challenges some of the most marginalized people in Ontario experience because of race, disability and immigration status, we have heard of many such cases.

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From exploited to supported: Phasing out Canada's lowest wage work programs

Photo: flickr/· · · — — — · · ·

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Ontario service organization Community Living Algoma officially ended its sheltered workshop program in September.

The Sault Ste. Marie group, headed by executive director John Policicchio, began operating the program in the 1960s. 

"By the early 1990s there was somewhere close to 130 people who attended the sheltered workshop," Policicchio said.   

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Demands for change to Canada's immigration detention system mount in wake of deaths

Photo: flickr/End Immigration Detention Network

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Nearly 80 detainees at Central East Correctional Centre in Lindsay, Ontario ended a hunger strike over the weekend that was initiated last Thursday April 21.

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Columnists

The federal government is selective with its protection of privacy

Photo: Christian Eager/flickr

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It is now almost a pattern: every time we, as a human rights organization or activist, write to government agencies inquiring about cases of Canadians detained abroad or of Canadians subject to abuse or possible discrimination, the governmental response will certainly somehow contain the issue of "privacy."

"Privacy concerns" have been used as a powerful pretext for inaction or silence and this should be challenged and denounced.

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Constructing change: the activist toolkit

Syrian refugees: A progress report

April 19, 2016
| An interview with Maisie Lo, Director of Immigration Services at WoodGreen Community Services in Toronto.
Length: 08:25 minutes (7.72 MB)
Screenshot: Emergency Parliament Debate
| April 15, 2016

Occupations of INAC offices continue in solidarity with Attawapiskat

Photo: Idle No More Toronto Facebook page

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Update: According to Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, Government of Canada's official twitter page, INAC regional offices in Toronto, Regina, Winnipeg and Gatineau.

The #OccupyINAC group in Winnipeg has released an official statement which you can read here.


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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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