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Civil Liberties Watch

Migrants in Atlantic Canada: How to survive in a remittance economy

Photo: Flickr/undergroundbastard

There was a lot of ire and eye-rolling on March 7 when New Brunswick Conservative MP John Williamson, in response to a question about labour shortages in meat-packing and processing, claimed: "it makes no sense to pay whities to stay home w

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| March 27, 2015

Open letter: Four key reasons why we oppose Bill C-51

Photo: flickr/Gabriel Luneau

We are lawyers, activists, academics, and others who are gravely concerned about Bill C-51, which introduces national security-related amendments to several Canadian laws. We oppose the Bill, because it is overbroad, grants unchecked powers to government agencies, and allows for the unqualified infringements on the rights of people in Canada.

Some key deficiencies in Bill C-51 include:

1. Its overbroad definition of "threats"

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Write to your MP about Bill C-51

In the next few weeks, residents across Canada are planning actions to let our representatives in the House of Commons know that how they feel about Bill C-51.  Look on Facebook, join actions, get involved.  If you want to write to your member of Parliament, this is a great tool that automatically finds your MP and addresses the letter to them.  Remember, you do not need postage to send letters to your member of Parliament

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Photo: mtsrs/flickr
| March 26, 2015
| March 25, 2015
March 25, 2015 |
The union representing 51,000 postal workers is adding its voice to the growing chorus of concerns over Bill C-51, the federal government's sweeping national security bill.
Columnists

Lost in the '50s with Harper's anti-terror pablum

Photo: James Vaughan/flickr

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Last Friday, viewers of the CBC's flagship news program, The National, could be forgiven for thinking they were back in the Leave it to Beaver 1950s. Indeed, they ran a saccharine story that would have done proud former Soviet and East German state news agencies. In fact, had it run during the Cold War, it would hopefully be touted in today's journalism schools as an embarrassing parody of what their profession is supposed to be.

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March 23, 2015 |
Is there a need to create a broad and vague definition of terrorism that police and CSIS may one day use to label organizations a "criminal threat" to Canada's economy or "infrastructure?"
Columnists

Beyond dirty politics: Harperism threatens democracy itself

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr

It's getting worse.

Stephen Harper is now serving notice that he's willing to tear the social fabric of the country apart if that's what it takes to get his party re-elected. That is, if torquing democratic process, the rule of law, election rules, the tax system etc., etc., to make them conform to Harperism isn't enough, he'll throw stink bombs in the public place in the expectation that, amid the chaos, he'll be seen as the strong hand who can straighten things out.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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