Creating cities that work for women and girls

Creating cities that work for women and girls
Thursday, May 30, 2013 - 8:30am - 5:30pm

Location

Segal Graduate School of Business, Simon Fraser University
500 Granville St
Vancouver, BC
Canada
49° 17' 4.7148" N, 123° 6' 53.5392" W

CREATING CITIES THAT WORK FOR WOMEN AND GIRLS

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA -- Women Transforming Cities is hosting a national conference titled “Engaging Women, Transforming Cities: Designing an Ideal City for Women and Girls” on Thursday, May 30, 2013 featuring international, national, and local speakers examining policies and practices that impact women and girls living in cities. Panel sessions address key urban concerns including affordable housing, youth, safety, the environment, diversity, and social inclusion. The event takes place at Simon Fraser University’s Segal Graduate School of Business (500 Granville St., Vancouver).

The goal of the “Engaging Women, Transforming Cities” conference is to produce policy and best practice recommendations for cities. For more detailed information, see the conference webpage and the conference program.

Keynote speakers at the conference include:

  • Caroline Andrew, President of Women in Cities International/Femmes et Villes;

  • Prabha Khosla, an urban planner who works on cities, equalities and democratic local governance;

  • Karen Leibovici, President of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities;

  • Sylvia Bashevkin, Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; author of Tales of Two Cities: Women and Municipal Restructuring in London and Toronto.

When asked about the conference, Wendy Williams, Chair of the City of Vancouver’s Women’s Advisory Committee and co-chair of Women Transforming Cities, said, “Cities are where the majority of Canadian women live. We need cities that respect the diversity of women and girls. We need cities where housing is built that takes into account our gender, our age, our mobility, and our cultural heritage.”

Ellen Woodsworth, former Vancouver City Councillor and co-chair of Women Transforming Cities noted: “It is dangerous and difficult to be a girl or a woman in cities. As aboriginal women we disappear in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside; as immigrant women our language tools trap us in low-paid jobs; as athletes we are given the worst fields, rinks and tracks; as mothers we are trapped with our unpaid work, invisible yet glorified; as teenagers we are raped at home and in the streets; as graduates we can't find paid work. We are told Vancouver is the number one city in the world, but that’s not true for women and girls.”

About Women Transforming Cities:

Women Transforming Cities is an organisation dedicated to engaging women and girls in municipal decision-making, policy making, urban planning and budgeting in order to transform cities to be more equitable, inclusive and democratic for all residents.