Idle No More

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quizzical

"the crown" is the "crown" at least to every FN i've met. no matter what settlers think.

i've always viewed prov gov bldgs as mini-palaces the "crown" could and would  live in if they had to flee Britian.  it'd be "their land" and palaces to revamp. the military in canada swears alligence to "the crown" not to canada and canadians. there's a gg for a reason not 'cause canadians don't want to try for a republic.

"the crown" has directly deeded land to individual FN's persons and Peoples. the Ojibway actually hold territory along the foot hills by Hinton deeded to them directly by  "the crown" for services rendered in the past. another FN family i know has land deeded to them directly by a former king of "the crown" that's outside the land area of the reserve.

i don't agree with "the crown" directly deeding land to FN's. it's not theirs to deed in the first place. but they can and do and it makes my point very clear.

6079_Smith_W

How "the crown" makes sense to me?

Same way the Office of the Treaty Commissioner puts it - that we are ALL treaty people. As in, we have a contract, no matter how many crackers write in and say we should vote in a government that gets rid of that responsibility, and why can't we all just be "equal".

I'm not under any illusion that the Queen is going to fly in at the end of the show and save the day. What it means for me is that those of us who are not FN, and are on the other side of that contract are all personally responsible for that debt, and there is no imagining or legislating it away.

 

Serviam6

Catchfire wrote:

Serviam6 wrote:
On what grounds do you feel Chief Spence makes the best choice for a sole representitive to meet with Harper?

I don't, of course -- it's none of my business who "the best" choice is. But in terms of tactics, it would be one way for the chiefs to show solidarity in the face of Harper's dirty tricks and make him do what he is trying to avoid doing, in the face of international public opinion, political responsibility and ethical propriety.

At any rate it was just a musing I had. It doesn't matter what I think, what matters is the decisions indigenous people come to collectively, my approval or comprehension notwithstanding.

I would like it however, if those who agree with Spence's latest move might take the time to explain their approval, or what they expect to happen if the GG ultimately rejects the meeting.

I totally took the context of your post wrong sorry about that.

 

I was surprised by Chief Spence's decision. I'm trying to understand. By choosing not to meet the Prime Minister she is making a point but at the cost of being involved in the meeting. Harper would have never got away with not letting her go to the meeting but now he can keep her out in the cold.

Serviam6

quizzical wrote:

Serviam6 wrote:
theleftyinvestor wrote:
But at a time when the message is about listening and engaging in conversation, the optics of expelling reporters are not good.

I feel the same way.  I want to say it looks very bad. It is easy to counter that opinion by saying it doesn't matter what it looks like to anyone else but I think that is the difference between Canadians in general tuning in, listening and putting pressure on their politicans and skipping to the next news story.

wanna know something? no grass roots FN's give a shit what settlers view as good optics.

You're speaking for all grass roots FN people?

kropotkin1951

Serviam6 wrote:

quizzical wrote:

wanna know something? no grass roots FN's give a shit what settlers view as good optics.

You're speaking for all grass roots FN people?

Seems to me that not giving a shit about what settlers think is part of the definition of a grass roots FN's activist.  Otherwise they would just have to give up and agree that assimilation is the best thing for everyone concerned.

theleftyinvestor

quizzical wrote:
no explanations would be good enough for you whites and good example is right here and now in this thread. your not listening to or reading what's been  given to ya and ya just blather on like your opinions are the best eva and we should be listening to ya. those days are gone!!!!!!!

I am reading and listening. Best not to make assumptions about who I am.

Serviam6

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Serviam6 wrote:

quizzical wrote:

wanna know something? no grass roots FN's give a shit what settlers view as good optics.

You're speaking for all grass roots FN people?

Seems to me that not giving a shit about what settlers think is part of the definition of a grass roots FN's activist.  Otherwise they would just have to give up and agree that assimilation is the best thing for everyone concerned.

now I find that an interesting observation. I'm going to research the definition of grassroots.

onlinediscountanvils

Serviam6 wrote:
Apparently Chief Spence called the acting Chief and told her to kick Global news reporters off the reservation.  The reporters were threatened with jail if they didn't leave.  The cop in the video clip seems pretty nervous. What's going on?

Charlie Angus, MP wrote:
I received a heartbreaking message from an Attawapiskat resident explaining why they kicked out the media. She was one of the trailer residents and was tired of being poked, prodded and blamed as if her community was full of scroungers and criminals. When you put aside the venom of the pundits you will see that this is a good community with really good people -- something that has been overlooked in this national circus.
[from his Facebook page]

sknguy II

Catchfire wrote:

...I would like it however, if those who agree with Spence's latest move might take the time to explain their approval, or what they expect to happen if the GG ultimately rejects the meeting.

I think it's right that the Chief is sticking with her original intentions of meeting with both the PM and the GG. A few years ago our community was holding an outdoor meal at a learning camp. There was rain in the area and several camp participants thought it a good idea to move the meal to the community hall. In other words, to avoid the rain. The camp was intended to involve the learning and teaching of traditional practices. And one of the Knowledge Keeper/Elders of the camp became upset with the moving of the meal, stating that "in the old days when people said they were going to do somethings they went ahead with it no matter". We could've eaten in the tents we had, and I also understood deep down what the Knowledge Keeper was actually saying.

I'm Nakawe and the Chief is Cree so our perspective might be a bit different. But, commitments, like Chief Spences are sacred things. And commitments, like the ones in the treaties are sacred things. We tend to think of treaties as promises which are made stricktly among peoples/nations. It's a contemporary view. But to Indigenous people they are also about commitments that are witnessed by the environments around us, and to whom our relationships generally impact anyway. Our promises are less towards each other than they are towards the things we humans really have obligations towards. Chief Spence has made her commitment. I can only respect that and not stand in the way of her relationship with that commitment. When you say your going to do something (like the Knowledge Keeper had said) you have to go through with what you say you're going to do. Commitments are a very imporntant part of any ceremony. Even the ones between you and a child, a sibling, a stranger, a pet or whatever.

But from a cultural perspective it's ultimately Chief Spence who is the only one who can decide what she needs to do with that commitment and that relationship. And she'll need the advice from Knowledge Keepers on whether or not she's done enough to honour that commitent. Commitments can't be politicised like what's been done to the treaties. And what some try to do with Chief Spence''s fast. I can't say one way or another what she should do. That would imply me stepping in between the Chief and her commitment, if you know what I mean.

Thanks anvils for the Charlie Angus facebook post.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Indigenous Grassroots & the Indian Act Band Council

quote:

Based on these definitions alone, I would assert that band councils as well as their political organizations are not a part of the grassroots. It doesn’t matter that they live within the community, or are family members. They form an elite within the community and wield far greater power than the community members themselves.

Furthermore, they gain their special legal, political and economic power from the colonial state in the form of funding, government legislation, recognition as official leaders, etc. Not only do they have their own interests as an elite (which may include their preservation as a band council, wealth, status, power, etc.), they are also vulnerable to state control, manipulation, and even liquidation. In short, they are totally dependent on the state for their continued existence, not on the grassroots people.....

 

Serviam6

sknguy II wrote:

Catchfire wrote:

...I would like it however, if those who agree with Spence's latest move might take the time to explain their approval, or what they expect to happen if the GG ultimately rejects the meeting.

I think it's right that the Chief is sticking with her original intentions of meeting with both the PM and the GG. A few years ago our community was holding an outdoor meal at a learning camp. There was rain in the area and several camp participants thought it a good idea to move the meal to the community hall. In other words, to avoid the rain. The camp was intended to involve the learning and teaching of traditional practices. And one of the Knowledge Keeper/Elders of the camp became upset with the moving of the meal, stating that "in the old days when people said they were going to do somethings they went ahead with it no matter". We could've eaten in the tents we had, and I also understood deep down what the Knowledge Keeper was actually saying.

I'm Nakawe and the Chief is Cree so our perspective might be a bit different. But, commitments, like Chief Spences are sacred things. And commitments, like the ones in the treaties are sacred things. We tend to think of treaties as promises which are made stricktly among peoples/nations. It's a contemporary view. But to Indigenous people they are also about commitments that are witnessed by the environments around us, and to whom our relationships generally impact anyway. Our promises are less towards each other than they are towards the things we humans really have obligations towards. Chief Spence has made her commitment. I can only respect that and not stand in the way of her relationship with that commitment. When you say your going to do something (like the Knowledge Keeper had said) you have to go through with what you say you're going to do. Commitments are a very imporntant part of any ceremony. Even the ones between you and a child, a sibling, a stranger, a pet or whatever.

But from a cultural perspective it's ultimately Chief Spence who is the only one who can decide what she needs to do with that commitment and that relationship. And she'll need the advice from Knowledge Keepers on whether or not she's done enough to honour that commitent. Commitments can't be politicised like what's been done to the treaties. And what some try to do with Chief Spence''s fast. I can't say one way or another what she should do. That would imply me stepping in between the Chief and her commitment, if you know what I mean.

Thanks anvils for the Charlie Angus facebook post.

This is a beautiful post and has given me much to think about thank you. With that i will step away from this thread for a time while I consider these words.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

The film was Directed by Dave Wilson (Brother Ali, Frank Ocean, Atmosphere, Yelawolf, Evidence), Produced by Tulalip tribal member and independent recording artist Brodie Stevens "Redskin" with footage by cameraman Ben Hampton. The film is narrated by author Gyasi Ross and elder Ramona Bennett. The gathering was organized by Lawerence Miguel and James Ole Coyote Sacred Water. Additional music by "Redskin."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ksESR2BVlqY#!

NDPP

Not the first time the Queen or GG has been solicited: In 1995, at Gustafsen Lake,  BC NDP AG Ujjal Dosanjh responded that if the grassroots people in the camp wanted to speak to her majesty they could buy themselves a stamp and write to her, but BC would not be involved in any alien intervention in the affairs of this state...

Wolverine Calls for National Protest

http://sisis.nativeweb.org/court/mar27wol.html

"...Is the popular assumption that the Canadian Courts and Police have jurisdiction legal or is that assumption criminally treasonable, fraudulent and complicitous in the Genocide of the Aboriginal Peoples of Canada as alleged in the petition?"

 

lagatta

I'm glad we have Karl on Parl. 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

EZLN comunicado: Zapatistas announce next steps

Following the largest mobilization since its uprising of January 1, 1994, the Zapatista Army of National Liberation releases the following communiqué.

Mexico.

December 30 2012.

To the People of Mexico:

To the People and Governments of the World:

Brothers and Sisters:

Compañeros and Compañeras:

In the early morning hours of December 21, 2012, tens of thousands of indigenous Zapatistas mobilized and took, peacefully and silently, five municipal seats in the southeast Mexican state of Chiapas....

http://roarmag.org/2013/01/ezln-zapatista-subcomandante-marcos-communique/

ilha formosa

Otavano wrote:

Is INM necessarily anti-globalist? If you consider that many nations straddling the Canada-US border acknowledge the border as a mere administrative hurdle, and that there are global indigenous organizations, I don't see how they're necessarily anti-globalist?

There are different kinds of globalization, thus the term "alter-globalization" as opposed to "anti-globalization." The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the UNDRIP are certainly "globalist."

The word "globalization" as it has been used for the last few decades generally refers to corporate globalization, because it's the corporatocracy that has been able to define how the word is used. The charters of corporate globalization are so-called "trade liberalization" deals, that bills like C-45 facilitate. That's right, write the laws for corporate profit, not for healthy people, communities and environments.

NDPP

This is the logical next step for the Indigenous movement here as well...

Caissa

The prime minister's office has relented slightly and is letting Gov. Gen. David Johnston hold a ceremonial meeting with First Nations leaders Friday.

The ceremonial meeting will take place at 6:30 p.m. ET at Rideau Hall, following the working meeting, said Andrew MacDougall, a spokesman for Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Johnston had said that he wouldn't attend a working meeting on public policy, despite demands by some First Nations leaders, including Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence, that he be there in his role as the Queen's representative in Canada.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2013/01/10/pol-first-nations-chiefs-day-before-pm-meeting.html

Ghislaine

Is there any word as whether Chief Spence will attend? 

Unionist

Idle No More has support of Gord Downie, Feist, Weakerthans, Steven Page and more

Quote:

A long list of Canadian musicians and artists have issued a statement of solidarity in support of the Idle No More movement including the Weakerthans, Feist, Gord Downie of the Tragically Hip and Steven Page formally of Barenaked Ladies.

The list continues to grow daily and a spokesperson for the group says they’re ashamed of how Canada has treated Indigenous peoples.

So, supporting Idle No More was an easy decision.

“I think a lot of people are recognizing the goals of Idle No More as being sensible and true. Theoretically they know these things, but sometimes it takes a movement like this to make people feel them,” said John K. Samson of the Weakerthans. “It’s an inspiring action from so many different people and so many parts of the world. I think there is a real power in that that can’t be ignored.”

There are actually hundreds of names from the arts community attached to the statement. Here's their Facebook page, for those who indulge in that thing:

Canadian Artists Statement of Solidarity with Idle No More

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

I just watched Gerry Caplan distinguish himself by proving to be a bigger piece of shit than Tom Flanagan and John Ivison. He called Spence "intransient." Nice one, asshole settler.

Ripple

I'm obviously missing the context. Or maybe intransient doesn't mean what I think it means. What is wrong with ascribing Chief Spence with the quality of permanence?

Oh, and, hi Catchfire.

kropotkin1951

If he had called her intransigent then it would have been an insult.  Which word did he use?

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

Whoops! Intransigent it was. I suppose more context is needed. He withdrew his support if her hunger strike, said that she was just elevating rhetoric without purpose and then said that if she dies, the responsibility would be hers, not Harper's, who has done all he could.

Also: Hi Ripple.

onlinediscountanvils

[url=http://www.toboldrollo.com/2013/01/04/a-dogs-breakfast-of-paternalism-ho... Dog’s Breakfast of Paternalism: How not to be an ally of the Idle No More movement[/url]

babble alumnus, Tobold Rollo wrote:
Social movements expect to elicit both derision and sympathy in the course of their struggles. Paradoxically, it is often the sympathetic voices of concerned outsiders that are the most exasperating, especially when genuine concern takes the form of counsel that is inappropriate or ill-informed. Adam Goldenberg’s recent Op-Ed, “Idle No More needs to go over Harper’s head” offers a good illustration.

Goldenberg points out that the ‘Idle No More’ movement needs to make itself politically relevant if it is to be successful. Because First Nations are not high on the Prime Minister’s priority list, activists must carefully craft their messaging and direct it at those whom Harper identifies as legitimate stakeholders: the voters. Accordingly, activists must avoid “squandering public sympathy for Chief Spence and her cause,” which means they must abjure activities that threaten Canadians since these will be “unlikely to win friends or influence people.” That sounds reasonable.

There is no doubt that Goldenberg intends like so many others to be a sympathetic ally of this Indigenous rights movement, but his piece nevertheless exhibits the classic soft paternalism that drives social movements crazy. I say ‘classic’ because the piece rehearses the same misplaced pattern of unsolicited (and just plain bad) advice that has obstructed virtually all political struggles. It  echoes, for instance, the counsel directed at Martin Luther King and other civil rights leaders in 1963 by sympathetic white clergymen in Birmingham, Alabama. In a letter titled ‘A Call for Unity’, the clergymen cautioned against non-violent demonstrations, referring to them as “unwise and untimely” given their propensity to backfire and “incite hatred and violence” within their intended audience. They urged King and others to seek out “proper channels” for negotiation and resolution.

In response, King penned the now famous ‘Letter from a Birmingham Jail’, wherein he expressed his severe disappointment in those who supported civil rights for blacks while demanding that such rights be pursued in terms that were palatable to white society. One cannot help but cringe when members of dominant society tender their prudent instructions to the oppressed. I could not help but cringe when Goldenberg expresses anxiety that Idle No More may devolve into an unpalatable “dog’s breakfast of protest and pageantry” so distasteful that it “alienates the very Canadians who should be its audience.” The message to Indigenous peoples here is that their expressions of cultural resurgence and resistance may be a big turn-off for nervous Canadians, in much the same way I suppose as the genres of jazz, blues, and hip-hop in black cultures of urban resistance were so threatening to white society. I suppose that’s why they disappeared.

But the biggest fear among allies like Goldenberg seems to be that the movement will become politically ineffectual as it resorts to direct action, as activists “overplay their hand”. This is an empirical claim, and it is one that appears inaccurate given, for example, the context of direct action and confrontation that precipitated the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. Moreover, it does not seem to reflect the realities of past struggles. It was King’s belief that seeking to educate white society through civil discussion – the program preferred by many of his white allies – had failed to move a society steeped in racism. He believed that a more fundamental unsettling of white perspectives through civil disobedience was required before dialogue could gain any traction. That unsettling would occur as black activists “preset our very bodies as a means of laying our case before the conscience of the local and the national community.” Many white allies continued to argue against direct action on the grounds that white audiences found it discomforting. To that end, King suggested that his self-appointed advisors, however well-intentioned, were some of the movement’s greatest obstacles: “the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen’s Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate.”

I don’t wish to overdraw the parallels between the ‘Idle No More’ Indigenous rights movement and other movements. Naturally, there are important differences, not the least of which is that blacks and women sought meaningful equality under the law, whereas Indigenous activists seek meaningful self-determination. The one thing these movements agree on, however, is that our responsibility as members of the dominant society is to listen and learn, and that if we insist on offering prescriptions, to advance these within the privileged circles to which we belong. To be an ally means applying your acumen and expertise appropriately, to your own house, while others put their bodies on the line.

[apologies for quoting the entire piece, but I couldnt decide what parts not to highlight]

Mean Moe

Idle No More Survey----> https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/JSWR2ZC

lagatta

Who is Tobold Rollo? I don't place him, as a babbler. Good piece. 

I do want to add that I don't think all tactical and strategic advice is necessarily paternalistic, as long as we recognise the autonomy and self-determination of Indigenous peoples and their movements, including this one. 

onlinediscountanvils

lagatta wrote:
Who is Tobold Rollo? I don't place him, as a babbler. Good piece.

He was around for a few weeks in 2011. He was accused of being a troll, a Conservative or Liberal plant, and basically took a lot of shit from some longtime babblers for having opinions of his own. It's good to see that he's still writing, and that he's been welcomed back by rabble [see:[url=http://rabble.ca/news/2013/01/i-am-canadian-because-treaties-indigenous-... and [url=http://rabble.ca/news/2013/01/then-and-now-journalists-wrong-side-histor..., even if he no longer posts on babble.

ilha formosa

NDPP wrote:

This is the logical next step for the Indigenous movement here as well.

Certainly the situation in Chiapas is related, but it's hard to draw tight parallels between the Zapatistas and the entirety of all indigenous groups across Canada.

The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples looks worthy of more attention and discussion. I've been hoping there would be more commentary on its current relevance on this thread. People like Jeffery Simpson and Terry Glavin, who get paid to call themselves journalists, seem not to have heard about it at all. ...they're going to get left in the dust by what is the emergence of the world's largest and most powerful social movement...

Quote:

(Clayton Thomas-Muller:)...this movement is part of a global social movement that is taking a look at the neo-liberal free market economic agenda...and saying we want another world...with catastrophic climate change, with issues of the loss of natural capital to sustain our ridiculous economic system, the end of the era of cheap energy...the world sees the correlation between these types of neo-conservative policies and this never-ending war for energy that has been going on for the last generation...We are living in a time of reconciliation and whether or not this government is on our side of history or is going to stay on their side, they're going to get left in the dust by what is the emergence of the world's largest and most powerful social movement, and I know that the viewers all across the globe watching Al-Jazeera know what I'm talking about, and they want that same world as well. 

It's not difficult to draw a connection between INM and sizzling Australia - unless you write for a rag dependent on the auto/fossilfuel industry for a huge chunk of ad revenue (ie, the MSM).

Unionist

Here's a live feed from Ottawa - by Concordia's student TV:

http://cutvmontreal.ca/broadcasts/2012/12/21/2434

ETA: Oh, maybe not - could be from last month... heh, sorry.

 

kropotkin1951

Here is a precis from a government site. Note the emphasis on a government to government relationship which is behind the demand for a meeting with both the GG and the PM.

Instead of these they got changes to the Indian Act buried in a an Omnibus Budget  bill that in law changes the sui generis nature of the FN's land holdings. The treaty process in BC has been dragging on for over 20 years because the government wants extinguishment of aboriginal title in return for signing treaties.  If one looks at what happened in the Sliammon nation one can see how this issue is at the core of the debate in this province over treaty agreements.  Harper has unilaterally legislated what the governments treaty negotiators have been unable to get at the treaty table here except with a minority of the FN's in the process. 

Quote:

The report centred on a vision of a new relationship, founded on the recognition of Aboriginal peoples as self-governing nations with a unique place in Canada. It set out a 20-year agenda for change, recommending new legislation and institutions, additional resources, a redistribution of land and the rebuilding of Aboriginal nations, governments and communities. Recognizing that autonomy is not realistic without significant community development, RCAP called for early action in four areas; healing, economic development, human resources development, and the building of Aboriginal institutions. The Commission’s implementation strategy proposed that governments increase spending to reach $1.5 billion by Year 5 of the strategy, and $2 billion in the subsequent 15 years. The report argued that the additional investment over 20 years would save money in the long term.

Major recommendations included the following:

  • legislation, including a new Royal Proclamation stating Canada’s commitment to a new relationship and companion legislation setting out a treaty process and recognition of Aboriginal nations and governments;

  • recognition of an Aboriginal order of government, subject to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, with authority over matters related to the good government and welfare of Aboriginal peoples and their territories;

  • replacement of the federal Department of Indian Affairs with two departments, one to implement the new relationship with Aboriginal nations and one to provide services for non-self-governing communities;

  • creation of an Aboriginal parliament;

  • expansion of the Aboriginal land and resource base;

  • recognition of Métis self-government, provision of a land base, and recognition of Métis rights to hunt and fish on Crown land;

  • initiatives to address social, education, health and housing needs, including the training of 10,000 health professionals over a ten-year period, the establishment of an Aboriginal peoples’ university, and recognition of Aboriginal nations’ authority over child welfare.

The report highlighted several realities of importance to legislators and policy-makers. For example, today a significant percentage of Aboriginal people in Canada live in urban areas. Questions of urban self-government and disputes over government responsibility for the provision of services are therefore becoming increasingly prominent. A second demographic fact is that the Aboriginal population is currently growing at about twice the rate of the Canadian population; over half the Aboriginal population is under the age of 25. This has accentuated the need to address education, job creation, justice, health and recreation for Aboriginal youth.

http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/prb9924-e.htm

kropotkin1951

On an inspirational level here is a great piece about one of BC's elders.

Quote:

Check your ego, she advises, keep scrupulous track of money, focus your goals on protection of water -- a sacred resource and a responsibility squandered by senior government.

Howard believes defending water and land will "wake up" mainstream Canadians and gain their support. Indigenous rights, lands and treaties must remain key issues, Howard says, as well as the localized grievances that drive each INM "chapter." Articulate your purposes clearly, listen to elders and make a plan for elders and children if violence erupts, she says. Plan to strategically escalate tactics and expect police to start to react violently, Howard tells those who ask. She even sets out her savvy political insights in clear point form on Facebook for those who seek her counsel.

Increasingly, Howard is being recognized for her bid to ground and focus Idle No More.

A Mowachacht education in power imbalance

Howard, now 62 and an influential member of the city of Vancouver's Urban Aboriginal Peoples Advisory Committee, became an activist early in life, learning from her great-grandfather, her grandmother and parents. She recalls her grandmother's anger at seeing the rich timber resources on their traditional territory being hauled away for logs and sawdust, making millions of dollars while her own family lacked a house to live in. Howard grew up mostly on the Mowachacht reserve, a strip of miserable houses that was moved from its rich traditional land and waters at isolated Friendly Cove to the doorstep of the Tahsis pulp mill, in another nation's territory and close to everything evil: Foul pollution from the pulp mill in the form of smoke and sour gas plumes that swept daily through the village, bad food and alcohol, and racism, from the logging town of Gold River.

From taking part in her late teens in blockades over logging and loss of land on Vancouver Island, Howard went on to become a band manager in her twenties with her troubled home Mowachacht community, near Gold River on Vancouver Island; and then began to work with the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, the World Council of Indigenous Peoples, the Vancouver School Board as a native support worker, and as co-chair of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council. At the heart of all her political activism has been a quiet rage against the inequities and racism she faced from a very young age.

Lillian Howard's motivation to keep her fast, at least until Prime Minister Stephen Harper finally meets with Assembly of First Nations leaders on Jan. 11, is fuelled by the teachings of her elders and political mentors from whom she has learned so much, ranging from Cree writer, broadcaster and activist Bernelda Wheeler; the late George Manuel, president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs; Vuntat Gwich'in leader Rosalee Tizya and Rigoberta Menchu, the Guatemalan indigenous activist. Lillian was by Rigoberta's side in 1992 when the fiery Mayan woman became the first indigenous person to win the Nobel Peace Prize, for her work on social justice and ethno-cultural reconciliation.

http://thetyee.ca/News/2013/01/11/Lillian-Rose-Howard-Hunger-Strike/

Unionist

It appears that Chief Spence is on her way to Rideau Hall to meet with the Governor-General.

 

NDPP

RT: Indigenous Occupy: Canadian Grassroots Native Movement on Rise (and vid)

http://rt.com/news/idle-no-more-canada-834/

"An indigenous movement known as 'Idle No More' is gaining momentum in Canada. The First Nations people have promised to bring the country's economy 'down to its knees' if aboriginals' voices remain unheard..."

Matuwehs Matuwehs's picture

Ah so refreshing to join a commentary section based on respectful dialogue, and a true engagement of the issues..I am a grassroots actiivist in the INM movement with more questions than answers, Im a bit weary of trying to defend the cause on MSM sites, and am looking forward to asking questions here..Woliwon to Rabble for hosting  the forum

Matuwehs Matuwehs's picture

Ah so refreshing to join a commentary section based on respectful dialogue, and a true engagement of the issues..I am a grassroots activist in the INM movement with more questions than answers, Im a bit weary of trying to defend the cause on MSM sites, and am looking forward to asking questions here..Woliwon to Rabble for hosting  the forum

Unionist

Welcome, Matuwehs!

Here's a fairly comprehensive MSM story about some of yesterday's events:

[url=http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2013/01/11/pol-first-nations-spence-... Spence vows to continue hunger strike after GG meeting [/url]

Quote:
Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence vowed to remain on a hunger strike, shortly after she and about 100 other chiefs attended a ceremonial event with the Governor General at Rideau Hall in Ottawa. [...]

Spence left Rideau Hall early with the sense that the gathering had accomplished little.

"It didn't feel too good inside that house … but we stood up for your rights," Danny Metatawabin, who speaks for Spence, told gathered First Nations chiefs as he described the meeting as "a show, a picture opportunity." [...]

Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan, addressing reporters on Parliament Hill, said the prime minister had agreed to:

  • High-level dialogue on treaty relationships and comprehensive land claims.
  • Enhanced oversight from PMO and Privy Council.
  • Holding further meetings with the head of the AFN.

However, on the environmental changes in the omnibus bills that so concern the Idle No More movement, Duncan insisted that constitutional obligations to Aboriginal Peoples were in fact respected by the government when it drew up the bills.

On the issue of resource revenue-sharing, Duncan said, "The federal government does not receive resource revenues, and so that's a question that really will involve the provinces and that's — that was recognized by the room." [...]

After the meeting, Atleo downplayed any rifts between aboriginal leadership.

"We have full consensus on the substance of the issues that were pressed fully today by the delegation that went to the prime minister," Atleo told The National's Wendy Mesley. "It's going to require real work to follow through, but we have now a highest level mandate from the prime minister. I cannot understate that the voices of our people helped create the level of urgency."

Grand Chief Matthew Coon Come of Quebec, who also attended the Harper meeting, told CBC News Network's Power & Politics that he was surprised by the reaction of the prime minister whom he said "moved a couple of posts forward." [...]

Coon Come said there was no commitment to hold an inquiry into the issue of missing aboriginal women. However Coon Come added he thinks there are too many inquiries, and said he favours "concrete measures" to reduce harm to women. [...]

Before the meeting ended, Grand Chief Derek Nepinak of Manitoba, who shunned the event, called Friday "a great victory" and said he was "ecstatic about our drums and about our people today."

Pam Palmater, an Idle No More spokesperson who ran against Atleo for the AFN leadership, said Atleo has no independent decision-making power. The fact Atleo and what she called "a minority of chiefs" attended the meeting "doesn't mean good things for the AFN," Palmater said on Power & Politics.

She also said that chiefs, such as Nepinak, who boycotted the meeting, "took their control back" and that they are the ones who control the AFN. [...]

Chiefs from Ontario and Manitoba have called for a non-confidence vote for the AFN national chief because Atleo didn't boycott Friday afternoon's talks with Harper.

Grand Chief Gordon Peters told reporters Friday that aboriginal protesters will block major roads and rail lines in Ontario on Wednesday if their demands are not met. He also threatened to go to international investors and tell them their resource extraction projects are not safe if the government pushes through developments without consent from First Nations.

Tommy_Paine

Question for those in more legal know that myself-- Related to blockades in Ontario, I note that Justice David Brown's name comes up. As it did with the Occupy movement in Toronto, and the G20 protests in that same city.  Brown allowed the eviction of the Occupyers, and allowed the use of sound cannon (though at levels that didn't burst ear drums) at the G20.  

I'm wondering if it's odd that it seems this judge gets these cases.  How are judges selected when someone asks for an injunction, etc.?

 

theleftyinvestor

FYI I posted it in another thread already but Romeo Saganash is coming back from sick leave Monday. I can't imagine him not having something to say.

On the question of divisions over whether one group of chiefs was wrong to attend the meeting rather than boycott... I plead no opinion as it's a question of self-determination. It's not up to me to decide how FN wants to be represented.

What does put me off is the complete intransigence of Harper on the omnibus environmental changes. That's completely unacceptable.

Unionist

ASSÉ is the student federation which founded CLASSE and led the mobilization for last year's strike.

ASSÉ in solidarity with Idle No More

Quote:

Last year the streets of Quebec vibrated to the rhythm of hundreds of thousands of marching feet, as our student strike against an increase in university tuition fees blossomed into the political awakening of a society.

Today, malls and public squares and railways across Canada are vibrating to another rhythm, the drum beat of a surging and inspiring movement of Indigenous peoples, for cultural renewal, for land rights, for environmental protection, and for decolonization.

The red feather, worn on the lapel of those in the Idle No More movement, symbolises union behind a common struggle. We thus think that our struggles can be joined and together strengthened, and this is why we’ll wear the red feather as we have worn the red square.

If 2012 was the year of our Maple Spring, we are ready to greet the Native spring of 2013.

We stand in solidarity with Idle No More. We stand in solidarity with Indigenous hunger strikers Theresa Spence, Emil Bell, Raymond Robinson, Aniesh Vollant and Janet Pilot from the Quebec Innu community of Uashat, and others whose names we have not yet learned.

We are a student union, but the scope of our vision has always been about more than education. Ours is a fight against an elite who cannot see beyond the next quarter’s profit, an elite for whom nature has value only when measured in economic spin-offs.

Indigenous peoples have been the greatest victims of this elite’s agenda to plunder resources in Quebec and Canada. But in the territories of the Algonquins, the Innu, the Mohawk, the Atikamekw, and elsewhere, they have also been this agenda’s fiercest opponents.

Because of their aboriginal rights, Indigenous peoples have the best chance to stop the destruction of our shared lands and waters and to manage them sustainably. We should support these struggles, in the name of mutual respect.

We want to think and act for the generations to come.

Now is the time for overcoming old divides by building new alliances. For too long native and non-native peoples have been pitted against another, precisely because this elite feared nothing more than the discovery of our mutual interests.

ASSÉ has already begun a process to develop a proposal for a pan-Canadian coalition that would unite Indigenous, Quebec and Canadian social movements. Together, we can defeat this assault the people who live on this land.

Continuons le combat.

Let the struggle continue.

NDPP

Blockades Set to Hit Three Provinces Wednesday

http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2013/01/13/mass-blockades-set-for-wednesday/

"Mass blockades are expected to hit at least three provinces this coming Wednesday..."

theleftyinvestor

One of many Liberals on Twitter today trotted out the old trope about how if the NDP had voted with Liberals in 2005/6, the Kelowna Accord would be law today.

Good luck with that party renewal thing.

kropotkin1951

Quote:

Blockades Set to Hit Three Provinces Wednesday

Grand Chief Gordon Peters of the Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians told reporters Friday that economic disruptions were in the works for Wednesday.

“We can’t live in poverty anymore while Canadians live this great life,” said Peters, whose organization is based in Ontario. “We’ll stop it the only way we can stop it…Stop the roads, stop the rails, stop the transportation of goods.”

Onion Lake Cree Nation Chief Wallace Fox said during a chiefs’ meeting Thursday night that economic disruptions loomed.

“No longer will the prime minister dictate to us. If we have to shut down this economy, then we will,” said Fox, whose community is part of Treaty 6 in Saskatchewan.

http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2013/01/13/mass-blockades-set-for-wednesday/

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I wonder if the provinces or municipalities affected will simply get court injunctions to stop the blockades? But maybe that's the strategy - force everyone to court? Probably would be a better strategy not to announce your intentions ahead of time, and let the element of surprise work for you.

Ghislaine

[url=http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2013/01/12/pol-the-house-matthew-c... Quebec Grand Chief calls on Theresa Spence to end Hunger Strike [/url]:

 

Quote:

Coon Come told Solomon he thinks Spence has been successful in her demands, and that it's time to put her health first.

"I would hope that she would [end her hunger strike.], for her health. I think she has succeeded. The Governor General responded by saying I will meet. Maybe not the way she wanted it. The Prime Minister said he was going to meet with First Nations. I think both have been done."

But in a written statement released Saturday, Spence said "we are deeply disappointed that my efforts to bring both the Governor General and Prime Minister of Canada with our First Nations leaders has been compromised while my life along with Raymond Robinson and Jean Sock lives hang in the balance."

Coon Come, a long-time advocate for the rights of indigenous peoples in Canada, is also best known for his fight against the Quebec government's James Bay hydroelectric project.

 

Serviam6

onlinediscountanvils wrote:

lagatta wrote:
Who is Tobold Rollo? I don't place him, as a babbler. Good piece.

He was around for a few weeks in 2011. He was accused of being a troll, a Conservative or Liberal plant, and basically took a lot of shit from some longtime babblers for having opinions of his own. It's good to see that he's still writing, and that he's been welcomed back by rabble [see:[url=http://rabble.ca/news/2013/01/i-am-canadian-because-treaties-indigenous-... and [url=http://rabble.ca/news/2013/01/then-and-now-journalists-wrong-side-histor..., even if he no longer posts on babble.

 

Hopefully in the future members with somewhat different views won't immediately be accused of being Conservative's in disguise.

 

I really like Coon Come and enjoy hearing from him, I hope Chief Spence listens. Is there be a point where doctors can order her to start eating, or be physically forced to start eating or something?

Otavano

The Langevin block?! Are they serious? Hector Langevin was the Minister of Public works under John A. Macdonald, and the one who approved the establishment of the Residantial School System. I'm sure every single indigenous Canadian noticed the irony in that.

Otavano

The Langevin block?! Are they serious? Hector Langevin was the Minister of Public works under John A. Macdonald, and the one who approved the establishment of the Residantial School System. I'm sure every single indigenous Canadian noticed the irony in that.

kropotkin1951

Serviam6 wrote:

Is there be a point where doctors can order her to start eating, or be physically forced to start eating or something?

WTF are you advocating government initiated physical force to stop her protest? Fortunately for her she is not attending a residential school because they would have fixed her. 

You should know that was a tactic used in the USA and UK against the suffragettes and almost killed some of them. Your statement no matter what its intent reads like one that would only be made about a "fragile" woman and not a man.

Quote:

From 1905 until the outbreak of the first world war, about 1,000 "suffragettes", as they became known, were sent to prison where, from 1909, many used the hunger strike as a political tool. Rather than concede to their demands, however, the government responded with forcible feeding. Under the notorious "Cat and Mouse" Act, rushed through parliament in April 1913, the vicious circle of hunger striking and forcible feeding became even more of an ordeal since prisoners who had damaged their health through their own conduct could be released into the community and then, once fit, rearrested to continue their sentence.

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=93438

Quote:

In the early 20th century in the U.S., suffragettes engaged in hunger strikes while in prison, following the lead of British suffragettes several years earlier — threatening to martyr themselves unless they were allowed to participate in politics. Alice Paul, one of the American suffragettes, also pressured Woodrow Wilson on his involvement in the war. As in Britain, the government treated them brutally while in prison, in many cases force-feeding them. The latter resulted in a public outcry against treating educated women fasting for political purposes as if they were criminally ill or insane. The public response to this direct action caused Woodrow Wilson to announce his support for the 19th amendment, which was passed three years after the then-famous actions of Alice Paul, Lucy Burns and many others. These suffragettes were later commemorated in the film "Iron-Jawed Angels."

http://www.codepinkalert.org/article.php?id=1025

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Mulcair called for Spence to end her hunger strike today on CTV's QP. he also said he's been in constant touch with Atleo, whom he calls an extraordinary leader.

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