Reopening of schools

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Aristotleded24

epaulo13 wrote:

Looks like we're even.

..no we are not. you've been coming at this from a libertarian position..on a left leaning board.  

So different perspectives or me making up my own mind about how I think or feel about something is wrong. Got it.

Aristotleded24

More on the safety aspect of opening or closing schools:

Quote:
After living in a hoarding situation and dealing with verbal abuse growing up, an Ontario mother is warning about the risks to children if they do not return to classrooms in the fall.

In a Facebook post, Bronwen Goouch-Alsop shared her childhood experience with her mother who was later diagnosed with a severe personality disorder, schizophrenia and a hoarding disorder. Goouch-Alsop said her mother also struggled with substance abuse.

"I grew up in this from 7 years of age until 12 years old. My daily haven away from this disaster intertwined with emotional and verbal abuse was 5 full days of school away from my mother’s home. Every morning when she dropped me off to school I knew I was safe away from the smells of rotting garbage and stumbling over garbage at every corner," Goouch-Alsop wrote in the post shared on Tuesday.

Goouch-Alsop, who now works in early childhood education, told CTVNews.ca that going to school "saved" her. She added that if she was a child trapped in her mother's home amid the COVID-19 pandemic, she doesn’t know if she would have survived.

...

"Children right now are being abused in homes that might look picture perfect. I grew up in a wealthy neighborhood, I went to a private school, but it wasn't perfect on the inside it was a nightmare and I was being abused, but no one knew," she said.

"I am extremely concerned that this may be the case for many other kids if they don’t have school every day."

Ontario Premier Doug Ford said Monday that he wants to see students back in the classroom this fall, as the number of new COVID-19 cases reported daily in the province continues to decrease.

Ford acknowledges that the plan is not without risk and says his government will "continue planning for every possible scenario" to keep kids safe as they get back to school.

However, Goouch-Alsop said children should have been more of a priority in the early stages of Ontario’s reopening, adding that a plan for schools should have been in place "months ago."

...

Goouch-Alsop -- who's three-year-old son is deaf and hard of hearing and who's daughter, 5, has ADHD and sensory processing disorder -- said not returning to school will be especially hard on parents of children with special needs.

"[My daughter] was doing really, really well in school, watching all of her friends playing, role modeling what they were doing, and sort of stepping out of that fear of things that she had with her sensory processing disorder, but… as soon as the pandemic hit, she regressed," Goouch-Alsop explained.

Goouch-Alsop said children with special needs don't get the same experience from their parents as they do being around other children in a classroom setting. She said remote learning also has not worked for her daughter, adding that even getting her to engage in her therapy via online sessions has been difficult.

"She refused to go out at all, or walk around the block to get some fresh air, because when you have a lot of sensory issues, the wind or even just temperature changes can really effect you," Goouch-Alsop said. "But when she was in school, her teacher said she had no problem going outside for recess, she would just follow all the other kids."

Pondering

Aristotleded24 wrote:

That's bullshit. There is a great deal of evidence that children are not only at a low risk for a bad outcome, but also low risk for transmission. But that evidence has been ignored because it's become fashionable to ignore anything suggesting that the coronavirus threat may not be the big thing we think it is.

No there isn't. Conclusions were based on assumptions not widespread testing of children. More recently it has been discovered that asymtomatic children can be carrying a virus load twice that of someone so sick they are on a ventilator. Even more recently it has been discovered that an infected child can be carrying antibodies.

Children infect their parents and anyone else they love because they hang all over us. Anyone who has ever been a parent knows that children are vectors of disease. Children can also infect teachers who are deserving of protection.

Covid-19 may be used as an excuse for governments to gather more power but it is not a hoax and the left is not anti-government.

In Quebec one Karaoke night has led to 40 direct infections and the secondary infection of 3 children who now have to be kept out of school.

There are safe ways to bring back many activities. Downplaying the threat of the virus means people will disregard safety measures which will lead to a harsher lockdown.

NDPP

epaulo13 wrote:

....on a left leaning board.  

NDPP wrote:

LOL.

Aristotleded24

Pondering wrote:
In Quebec one Karaoke night has led to 40 direct infections and the secondary infection of 3 children who now have to be kept out of school.

Which while unfortunate for the people involved and I do hope they recover, is not something I see as a major health risk in a province with a population of millions of people.

NDPP

Spike in COVID-19 Cases 'Alarming', List of Infected Schools Published: Quebec Health Minister

https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/spike-in-covid-19-cases-alarming-list-of-inf...

"...The government published a list of schools with at least one COVID-19 Friday. The complete list is published below. There are 47 schools of the 3,000 in the province that have reported at least one positive case..."

Early days yet.

Aristotleded24

NDPP wrote:

Spike in COVID-19 Cases 'Alarming', List of Infected Schools Published: Quebec Health Minister

https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/spike-in-covid-19-cases-alarming-list-of-inf...

"...The government published a list of schools with at least one COVID-19 Friday. The complete list is published below. There are 47 schools of the 3,000 in the province that have reported at least one positive case..."

Early days yet.

And 2,933 schools that haven't.

Misfit Misfit's picture

I went grocery shopping today in rural Saskatchewan. There are happy happy mothers all over the place smiling and so excited about their children going back to school.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Aristotleded24 wrote:

epaulo13 wrote:

Looks like we're even.

..no we are not. you've been coming at this from a libertarian position..on a left leaning board.  

So different perspectives or me making up my own mind about how I think or feel about something is wrong. Got it.

..nobody is talking about right or wrong. you meant to be provocative and when that happens others react. just like nicky can be provocative and then you react. 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

'The body says no': Three teachers on their decisions not to return to school this fall

Maria Vamvalis was hoping to return to her Grade 8 classroom this fall after previously being on leave as she undertook her PhD research focused in part on youth mental health. After weeks of consideration, Vamvalis has decided not to return to teaching this year, instead opting to continue her unpaid leave. 

"I do not have this trust that the decisions being made by the government are actually in the interest of the wellbeing of students and teachers," she said, calling her decision not to return both an act of conscience and of resistance.

It's not a choice all teachers can afford; rabble.ca has spoken with several other teachers who say if they could, they would be making the same decision. Vamvalis said it means taking a pay cut, but she will be able to take on project-based work to supplement her income in the meantime. 

Vamvalis, who works for the Toronto District School Board, did not take the decision to not return lightly. Previously, she had spoken with rabble about her concerns with her school’s ventilation and her classroom's awkward orientation, which would make physical distancing with 30 some students next to impossible. Vamvalis has a chronic lung condition, and the ventilation in her school already aggravated the problem. 

When the plan was announced, Vamvalis said she woke up the next morning with a feeling of dread. 

"My whole body was saying to me, I don’t think I can do this," she said. "The body says no."

At that time, Vamvalis had been holding off on her decision. She was waiting to see if there were any major changes to the back to school plan that would allow her to feel comfortable returning to school health wise, but would also make her feel like she could adequately support her students.

The biggest problem for Vamvalis on both counts was the lack of reduced class sizes in elementary schools.

"Students need our attention more than ever. Some students are very traumatized. There is a lot that students need to process. There have been lags in learning. This is to me what's unconscionable: that this government is not providing students the conditions they need to actually emerge with greater resilience and wellbeing from this very unprecedented event," she said.  

While Vamvalis has come to her final decision, other teachers continue to take a "wait and see" approach, as new updates on their particular back-to-school circumstances continue to come in every few days. 

In Vancouver, a semi-retired occasional teacher makes himself unavailable for work

One retired B.C. teacher who still does occasional or supply teaching told rabble.ca he won't be going back to work right away, but will wait to see how things play out for a while.

The Vancouver School Board teacher said because he's on what's called a "retired limited list" of teachers, he has the ability to make himself unavailable to work certain days, or he can simply not answer the phone when he is called on for work. 

Because he's on the list of retired occasional teachers, he's usually one of the last to be called. That said, he said B.C. is generally short on teachers, and if he wanted to, he could easily maintain a full-time schedule even with his current position. 

The teacher, who wished to remain anonymous so as not to jeopardize his working relationships, said he's waiting until he can see how things work out in Vancouver schools before he makes the decision to return.

"At this point, I think it's pretty unlikely I'd go back into a class unless it's shown that enough [safety] measures are being taken," he said.....

Pondering

I don't think anyone is against schools reopening. I'm certainly not. What I am against is parents being prevented from choosing online learning for their own children and I'm against leaving class sizes as they are which is far to large to begin with.

When I was in grade school most children were able to walk to school. Elementary schools had about 300 kids and a high school was considered big if it had 750 students. Pushing 1000 was an indication that another school needed to be built. The norm for class size was around 20 to 24 students. More than 24 was considered a large class on the verge of needing to be split. That was with no special needs children at all.

While I agree integrating more special needs students into the classroom is a good idea it was not done for them it was done to reduce costs.

The reopening of schools now is not being done for the sake of the children either. Even though many are better off in school that is not the motivation of the government. The point is to get kids babysit again so their parents can go to work.

kropotkin1951

I keep saying that in BC over the next two to four weeks we are about to find out how prevalent COVID is in our community. Everyone in the school system knows that September is a bad month for colds and flues. All the kids mix their summer germs into one big air pool and they all get exposed to a great cocktail of viruses and flues. If COVID is in the community it will show up in the schools and start infecting the children who will bring it home and infect their family.

I hope our resident COVID skeptic is right and it is no big problem because it appears we are headed down a path that leads to the answer. Personally I think the cat is dead but A24 might be right and it is alive.

Aristotleded24

Sweden schooled on its covid response:

Quote:
Sweden's decision to keep schools open during the pandemic resulted in no higher rate of infection among its schoolchildren than in neighbouring Finland, where schools did temporarily close, their public health agencies said in a joint report.

Sweden decided to forego a hard lockdown and keep most schools and businesses open throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, a divisive strategy that set it apart from most of Europe.

Its Public Health Agency has maintained that the negative consequences of a shutdown on the economy and society outweigh the benefits, and says this also applies to schools.

The report, which has not been peer-reviewed, found that during the period of February 24 to June 14, there were 1,124 confirmed cases of COVID-19 among children in Sweden, around 0.05% of the total number of children aged 1-19.

Finland recorded 584 cases in the same period, also equivalent to around 0.05%.

"In conclusion, (the) closure or not of schools had no measurable direct impact on the number of laboratory confirmed cases in school-aged children in Finland or Sweden," the agencies said in the report, published last week.

Of course it's unfortunate for the children who do catch covid, but is all this necessary over a virus that has impacted 0.05% of the population?

Aristotleded24

kropotkin1951 wrote:
I hope our resident COVID skeptic is right and it is no big problem because it appears we are headed down a path that leads to the answer. Personally I think the cat is dead but A24 might be right and it is alive.

Compare Sweden to Finland in the article I posted. Both reported a similar percentage of infection for children. Sweden ripped off the band-aid and are now clearly in a downswing in their numbers. Finland thought they beat the virus, but their cases are trending upwards as of my composing this post. Compare different country trajectories here.

My guess is that there is an increase in the covid numbers when school opens, especially in Ontario, Alberta, BC and Quebec, numbers remain high relative to where they are today for some weeks, and then case numbers will fall off. For me, the question is how to manage the inevitable spike in covid cases while protecting those people who are most vulnerable to a bad outcome.

kropotkin1951

"For me, the question is how to manage the inevitable spike in covid cases while protecting those people who are most vulnerable to a bad outcome."

So if it is the people who are really vulnerable that you would isolate that begs the question is how to keep them away from their children when the schools open.  I avoid all sniffling children and have for years but unfortunately COVID is not that obvious in its early stages.

NDPP

Sweden Records Highest Death Tally in 150 Years in First Half of 2020

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/20/europe/sweden-deaths-highest-coronavirus-...

"Sweden reached its highest death tally in 150 years for the first half of 2020, according to the country's official statistics office. Between January and June this year, 51,405 deaths were registered - more than 6,500 fatalities (or 15%) over the same period in 2019. This is the highest number of deaths in Sweden during the first half of the year since 1869, when the country was struck by famine and 55,431 people died..."

Aristotleded24

kropotkin1951 wrote:
"For me, the question is how to manage the inevitable spike in covid cases while protecting those people who are most vulnerable to a bad outcome."

So if it is the people who are really vulnerable that you would isolate that begs the question is how to keep them away from their children when the schools open.  I avoid all sniffling children and have for years but unfortunately COVID is not that obvious in its early stages.

Perhaps our intransigent public health officials might admit their limitations and that there are things they don't know and learn from examples of countries that successfully managed the pandemic without massive lockdowns, restrictions, or school closures and get back to us on that.

Aristotleded24

NDPP wrote:
Sweden Records Highest Death Tally in 150 Years in First Half of 2020

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/20/europe/sweden-deaths-highest-coronavirus-...

"Sweden reached its highest death tally in 150 years for the first half of 2020, according to the country's official statistics office. Between January and June this year, 51,405 deaths were registered - more than 6,500 fatalities (or 15%) over the same period in 2019. This is the highest number of deaths in Sweden during the first half of the year since 1869, when the country was struck by famine and 55,431 people died..."

You're using CNN as a reliable source? If Sweden did such a bad job responding to covid, why haven't there been any public demonstrations against the government's handling of covid? Canada, the United States, Germany, Italy, the United Kindom, France, and Australia have all had people protesting against the restrictive measures. What does that tell you?

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Rural families given little choice when it comes to schooling, parents say

Some parents in rural eastern Ontario say they're being forced to send their kids back to school this fall because online learning simply isn't an option due to where they live.

Jennifer Britton, a mother of three living in Kinburn, on Ottawa's rural western edge, said the family's home internet isn't reliable enough for remote learning.

"We tried online learning [last spring] and we were given as much support as the school could provide," Britton, whose children attend Ottawa-Carleton District School Board (OCDSB) schools, told CBC Radio's All In A Day

When the pandemic shuttered classrooms in mid-March and children began learning from home, the OCDSB offered families including Britton's laptops and internet hotspots.

"But unfortunately in areas like mine, which is considered an internet dead zone, you can have all the hotspots in the world and it won't work because [the problem] is the cell signal. So if we don't have that then it's just not effective." 

Britton said her children quickly became frustrated with the poor connectivity and lost patience with online learning.

Last month, CBC Ottawa reported a network of municipalities in eastern Ontario is calling for $1.5 billion to finance something called the Gig Project, which aims to bring high-speed internet to underserved areas in the region.

Britton has lived in rural areas of New Brunswick, Quebec and Nova Scotia, but said for her family, poor connectivity has never been the issue it is in this region. Nor has it ever been so costly — Britton, whose husband works from home, said even with the poor service the family's monthly internet bill is about $800.....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

On behalf of parents, we’d like to thank the parent who yelled this at the Minister of PR —we mean... Minister of Education —- at the Minister’s PR stop today!

See clip here (give it a sec & it will jump to the moment): https://youtu.be/ViFjTn6aoes?t=726

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

How race, income and ‘opportunity hoarding’ will shape Canada’s back-to-school season

Privileged families are isolating children from COVID-19 in ‘learning pods,’ while racialized and lower-income families are hesitant to return to public schools, transit and communities with unknown risks. Can Canada seize the opportunity to close the gaps in education?

Two weeks before vice-principal Brandon Zoras was to welcome a group of students back to the classrooms at Toronto’s Westview Centennial Secondary School, a message appeared in his LinkedIn inbox from a stranger.

“Hi Brandon, hope you are doing well! I am looking for an experienced TDSB Grade 11 chemistry tutor to coach my son online only (due to social distancing) – to start right away. Please let me know if that is something you (or someone you know) can help my son with. Best regards.”

Irritated, Mr. Zoras groaned and deleted it without replying.

Westview has one of the largest Black student populations in the country and sits in the northwest corridor of Toronto, which has become the epicentre for COVID-19 infections. Many students live in cramped housing, have parents who are essential workers and rely on public transit to get around, all things that contribute to the high infection rate – which is 10 times that of the least-infected parts of the city. The average annual income for residents in the area is $27,984 – half of what it is for Toronto as a whole.

“It makes my heart hurt for the families who can’t afford a tutor or who can’t afford all these additional things,” said Mr. Zoras, a science educator.

Since he began working as an educator 11 years ago, he has seen the way public education funding has been diminished, how families in the system have found ways to privatize parts of their children’s schooling to get what they want. Education advocates say those efforts are making things less equitable for everyone else.

Every year, parents across the country lobby to get their children into advanced-placement classes, buy houses in neighbourhoods that will give them access to coveted schools and fundraise on the school council to bring in technology and high-level arts programming.

Now, with the return to school amidst a global pandemic, those efforts to secure the best for their children, known in sociology as “opportunity hoarding,” have become more overt. The confidence many had in the public-education system has been ripped apart because of reopening plans and it seems no amount of fundraising, private meetings with principals or school council strategizing can bring about the changes many are seeking for a safe return to school.

The result is some of the most privileged public-school families are opting for distance education, hiring personal tutors and forming private learning pods – decisions that are ostensibly made in the best interests of their children, but which will likely cause major rifts across race and class. Those in lower-income communities are also choosing remote learning because they have elderly relatives living with them who are vulnerable to getting sick, they feel a heightened threat from COVID-19 because they are in areas with the highest infection rates and the buildings in which they live pose challenges to getting to school on time in a pandemic.

That families on both ends of the socio-economic spectrum are opting for remote learning exposes cracks that already existed in the system. There’s a threat the most privileged will pull out to customize their own education since they can afford to, while others who are fearful of sending their children back to school but cannot pay for private help are becoming test subjects for a new realm of online learning. As plans are pulled together haphazardly, there’s a concern the divide will deepen.....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

That families on both ends of the socio-economic spectrum are opting for remote learning exposes cracks that already existed in the system. There’s a threat the most privileged will pull out to customize their own education since they can afford to, while others who are fearful of sending their children back to school but cannot pay for private help are becoming test subjects for a new realm of online learning. As plans are pulled together haphazardly, there’s a concern the divide will deepen.....

SCREEN NEW DEAL

FOR A FEW fleeting moments during New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s daily coronavirus briefing on Wednesday, the somber grimace that has filled our screens for weeks was briefly replaced by something resembling a smile.

“We are ready, we’re all-in,” the governor gushed. “We are New Yorkers, so we’re aggressive about it, we’re ambitious about it. … We realize that change is not only imminent, but it can actually be a friend if done the right way.”

The inspiration for these uncharacteristically good vibes was a video visit from former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, who joined the governor’s briefing to announce that he will be heading up a blue-ribbon commission to reimagine New York state’s post-Covid reality, with an emphasis on permanently integrating technology into every aspect of civic life.

“The first priorities of what we’re trying to do,” Schmidt said, “are focused on telehealth, remote learning, and broadband. … We need to look for solutions that can be presented now, and accelerated, and use technology to make things better.” Lest there be any doubt that the former Google chair’s goals were purely benevolent, his video background featured a framed pair of golden angel wings.

Just one day earlier, Cuomo had announced a similar partnership with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to develop “a smarter education system.” Calling Gates a “visionary,” Cuomo said the pandemic has created “a moment in history when we can actually incorporate and advance [Gates’s] ideas … all these buildings, all these physical classrooms — why with all the technology you have?” he asked, apparently rhetorically.

It has taken some time to gel, but something resembling a coherent Pandemic Shock Doctrine is beginning to emerge. Call it the “Screen New Deal.” Far more high-tech than anything we have seen during previous disasters, the future that is being rushed into being as the bodies still pile up treats our past weeks of physical isolation not as a painful necessity to save lives, but as a living laboratory for a permanent — and highly profitable — no-touch future....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Ontario Parent Action Network- Fighting for Public Education

This really concerns us. Why is the staff in the Minister of Education’s office apparently calling workplaces to complain about about doctors, nurses, epidemiologists & health providers publicly sharing their concerns about Ontario’s plan?

[David Fisman is a Toronto doctor & epidemiologist.]

...

Sadly, this does not surprise me at all. There are also reports of teachers being asked by school administrators to take down photos on social media of their classrooms where physical distancing is impossible. It is a difficult situation for teachers to be in.

...

Principal and Vice-Principal follow us to a back-to-school organizing rally for teachers and parents so they could tell the Board what we are up to.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

COVID-19 Cases Surge on College Campuses

COVID-19 cases are surging on college campuses across the country. More than 45,000 cases have been reported since late July. The State University of New York, Oneonta, has canceled in-person classes for the rest of the semester after nearly 400 students tested positive for coronavirus. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has announced a two-week lockdown after more than 700 students became infected.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Coronavirus: Class to self-isolate at Caerphilly school after positive test

The pupils at St Gwladys Primary School in Bargoed, Caerphilly, must stay at home for 14 days, although the rest of the school will remain open.

"We fully appreciate this will cause concern to parents and children at the school," a council spokesman said.

Caerphilly has seen 78 cases in the past week, the highest number in Wales.

A walk-in test centre opened outside Caerphilly Leisure Centre on Saturday for people with symptoms to get tested.

The school and council said the parents of all the affected children had been contacted and they are working with the contact tracing system to protect other pupils and the wider community.....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

 If Sweden did such a bad job responding to covid, why haven't there been any public demonstrations against the government's handling of covid? Canada, the United States, Germany, Italy, the United Kindom, France, and Australia have all had people protesting against the restrictive measures. What does that tell you?

“MAKE CORPORATIONS PROFITABLE AGAIN”

Perhaps a more appropriate contrast between the mass protest of the left and the anemic populism of the right is found by examining BLM and the “reopen” protests. While the above evidence reveals the critical mass that characterizes BLM protests today, a closer look at “reopen” demonstrates its astroturf nature.

Journalists saturated Americans with reporting on the reopen protests in April and May 2020, providing the impression that the movement was mass-based and that it reflected the concerns of local communities that were rising up in large numbers against the status quo. But this narrative was largely manufactured. Investigations of the movement revealed that it was mainly driven by obscure libertarian rhetoric that lamented “big government,” “tyranny” and “socialism” via the shutdown, although these views were not actually shared by the large majority of Americans, who supported the shutdowns in order to protect the public health.

Reopen protest groups operating across the country were primarily concerned with making corporations profitable again, rather than being concerned with health care professionals and service workers on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. These groups expressed virtually no concern with the poorest and most vulnerable Americans — disproportionately people of color — harmed by the coronavirus. Furthermore, the protests were heavily coordinated by a few large national and state organizations that were concerned with gun rights and corporate profits, rather than representing a spontaneous, decentralized, ground-up rebellion.

While the reopen movement retained a significant online presence, academic researchers found that nearly half of the accounts actively promoting the reopen protests on social media were bots. And there was little evidence, statistically speaking, that Americans who were the most harmed economically by the COVID-19 economic crisis were more likely to embrace the reopen movement.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Americans Overwhelmingly Support Stay-At-Home Restrictions, New Poll Finds

A new poll finds most Americans remain united in support of social distancing—with 87% supporting existing restrictions, or even wishing for stricter ones—even as several governors begin to roll back stay-at-home orders, and far-right protests pop up across the country against the restrictions.

Aristotleded24

epaulo13 wrote:

 If Sweden did such a bad job responding to covid, why haven't there been any public demonstrations against the government's handling of covid? Canada, the United States, Germany, Italy, the United Kindom, France, and Australia have all had people protesting against the restrictive measures. What does that tell you?

“MAKE CORPORATIONS PROFITABLE AGAIN”

Perhaps a more appropriate contrast between the mass protest of the left and the anemic populism of the right is found by examining BLM and the “reopen” protests. While the above evidence reveals the critical mass that characterizes BLM protests today, a closer look at “reopen” demonstrates its astroturf nature.

Journalists saturated Americans with reporting on the reopen protests in April and May 2020, providing the impression that the movement was mass-based and that it reflected the concerns of local communities that were rising up in large numbers against the status quo. But this narrative was largely manufactured. Investigations of the movement revealed that it was mainly driven by obscure libertarian rhetoric that lamented “big government,” “tyranny” and “socialism” via the shutdown, although these views were not actually shared by the large majority of Americans, who supported the shutdowns in order to protect the public health.

Reopen protest groups operating across the country were primarily concerned with making corporations profitable again, rather than being concerned with health care professionals and service workers on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. These groups expressed virtually no concern with the poorest and most vulnerable Americans — disproportionately people of color — harmed by the coronavirus. Furthermore, the protests were heavily coordinated by a few large national and state organizations that were concerned with gun rights and corporate profits, rather than representing a spontaneous, decentralized, ground-up rebellion.

While the reopen movement retained a significant online presence, academic researchers found that nearly half of the accounts actively promoting the reopen protests on social media were bots. And there was little evidence, statistically speaking, that Americans who were the most harmed economically by the COVID-19 economic crisis were more likely to embrace the reopen movement.

About the author of this piece:

Quote:
Anthony DiMaggio is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Lehigh University. He earned his PhD from the University of Illinois, Chicago, and is the author of nine books, including most recently: Political Power in America (SUNY Press, 2019) and Rebellion in America (Routledge, 2020).

So he's an academic who gets to continue to do his job at a university, not feeling the negative impacts of the shutdown that the rest of us are experiencing. For him to pontificate about "reopening" only being about "corportate profits" is disgusting.

I know it's trendy on the left these days to talk about "priviledge." I think many people going on about that need to look in the mirror at their own priviledge rather than lecturing everyone else. I especially thing that's true with respect to class and education.

Aristotleded24

epaulo13 wrote:
Americans Overwhelmingly Support Stay-At-Home Restrictions, New Poll Finds

A new poll finds most Americans remain united in support of social distancing—with 87% supporting existing restrictions, or even wishing for stricter ones—even as several governors begin to roll back stay-at-home orders, and far-right protests pop up across the country against the restrictions.

And a majority of Americans in light of 9/11 supported increased restrictions on civil liberties in terms of fighting terrorism. When people are scared, they will support whatever they feel will make them safe. Having a civil libertarian position in any kind of crisis, whether after a terrorist attack, the current covid crisis, or even in cities with high crime rates is not a popular position to take.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..your rebuttals are weak and pointless ari. they avoid addressing the subject matter and rely on your manufactured fear argument. 

Pondering

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Of course it's unfortunate for the children who do catch covid, but is all this necessary over a virus that has impacted 0.05% of the population?

The concern isn't just children catching it it is children bringing it home with them. Also I have to ask did they do general population testing or did they only test people who were symptomatic or had been in contact with someone symptomatic?

Aristotleded24 wrote:

So he's an academic who gets to continue to do his job at a university, not feeling the negative impacts of the shutdown that the rest of us are experiencing. For him to pontificate about "reopening" only being about "corportate profits" is disgusting.

I know it's trendy on the left these days to talk about "priviledge." I think many people going on about that need to look in the mirror at their own priviledge rather than lecturing everyone else. I especially thing that's true with respect to class and education.

Wow. I thought it was just the right wing that disparaged education.

You are assuming you speak for the less priveleged but I haven't noticed any poverty activists pushing for reopening faster. I haven't noticed any groups in  low income areas demanding reopening. Parents in those districts seem to be even more worried about schools being reopened without proper precautions being taken.

Keeping things under control benefits essential workers who have no choice but to work.

What you want is for "the left" to adopt this as an infringement on civil rights but the grand majority of us recognize this as a health crisis that disproportionately impacts people living in poverty and essential workers physically not just economically.

If there is anything good to come of this it will be in the form of pharmacare and basic income which will benefit people well after Covid is gone. We see an opportunity to accelerate the switch to a green sustainable economy.

Lifting restrictions so more people can die is an unlikely position for "the left".

Libertarians and the right focus heavily on individual rights  The left does too in the form of protecting individuals from being treated differently based on race or other characteristics. We defend rights enshrined in the Constitution and work to have anyone left out to be included, like trans people.

Right now the fight is for basic income. The right hates CERB claiming it discourages people from working. The answer is not force people back to work it is raising minimum wage so people want to work.

Working from home exploded for middle and upper class populations. As the economy opens up many companies and workers have decided working from home has many benefits and are not intending to ever return to the old model of everyone coming to the office. Some will reopen. Some office jobs require physical presense but it seems that most do not. Universities will continue to do a lot of distance learning.

The people forced back will be the servants to the wealthy and middle class. School reopenings are not rooted in the desire to do what's best for children. It's to get the babysitting system back-up the cheapest way possible to get low income people back to work asap.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Coronavirus: dozens of schools in England and Wales report outbreaks

Dozens of schools across England and Wales have reported coronavirus outbreaks, prompting some to shut their doors while others have sent staff and pupils home to self-isolate.

A week after children began returning to classrooms for the first time since lockdown in March, a number of schools across parts of the UK have been battling outbreaks.

In Liverpool, an estimated 200 pupils and 21 staff are self-isolating following positive cases at five schools in the city. In Suffolk, five teachers tested positive for coronavirus, leading the school to close, and in the Midlands a school that was visited by the prime minister less than two weeks ago has had one teacher test positive.

In areas including Bradford, Leeds, Lancashire, Manchester, Nottingham and Leicester, handfuls of pupils and staff who tested positive for the virus have led to schools asking some pupils to self-isolate....

Aristotleded24

epaulo13 wrote:

Coronavirus: dozens of schools in England and Wales report outbreaks

Dozens of schools across England and Wales have reported coronavirus outbreaks, prompting some to shut their doors while others have sent staff and pupils home to self-isolate.

A week after children began returning to classrooms for the first time since lockdown in March, a number of schools across parts of the UK have been battling outbreaks.

In Liverpool, an estimated 200 pupils and 21 staff are self-isolating following positive cases at five schools in the city. In Suffolk, five teachers tested positive for coronavirus, leading the school to close, and in the Midlands a school that was visited by the prime minister less than two weeks ago has had one teacher test positive.

In areas including Bradford, Leeds, Lancashire, Manchester, Nottingham and Leicester, handfuls of pupils and staff who tested positive for the virus have led to schools asking some pupils to self-isolate....

"Dozens of schools" out of how many schools are there currently in England and Wales? 200 students and 21 staff in Liverpool? How many students and staff members are there total in that city?

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

"Dozens of schools" out of how many schools are there currently in England and Wales? 200 students and 21 staff in Liverpool? How many students and staff members are there total in that city?

..meaningless comments are not statistically helpful. they don't address the reopening conditions which is crucial. these conditions are being implemented by the very governments you say (and i agree) have mishandled the pandemic. you are not being consistent.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..kropotkin posted this in another thread. a 26 year old personal trainer.

..from a 26 yrFormer Powell River resident outlines her COVID-19 affliction

quote:

She said she began to feel the effects of COVID-19 about three days after her exposure. She was notified by the spin studio on the Monday afternoon following the class that there had been a COVID-19 exposure, and by Monday evening, she was feeling “a little bit off.” She went into isolation that night. She was tested for COVID-19 on the Wednesday, less than a week after the exposure.

By the time she was tested, she was having trouble breathing. She called Alberta Health Services and was advised she needed to go to emergency, so she went straight to the hospital after calling 811. She was tested at emergency and it took fewer than 24 hours before she heard a positive diagnosis.

Her boyfriend also was tested, but his results came back negative.

While Oele was sitting in emergency, she said she was not fighting for breath but she had a feeling of heaviness in her chest. She said when speaking, she would be taking in a deep breath after each sentence. She said that was the only symptom she had up until that time, other than a runny nose.

While waiting for her COVID-19 test, Oele said she was rocked with a fever, chills and a headache.

“When I came home, I pretty much just fell asleep and then I was sleeping all day Thursday,” said Oele. “I pretty much knew that I had it. There was no thought in my mind that I randomly picked up a sickness. When Alberta Health Services called me and told me that I tested positive, I had kind of come to terms with the fact that I had COVID-19.”

Oele said her thinking was that she was in a demographic where she would be okay, so she was preparing for the worst but expecting the best.

“I’m very lucky that was the case,” she said. “When they told me I was positive I felt scared but also prepared.”

Oele didn’t expect her isolation to be so strict. She said she is very fortunate in that she has a bedroom with an en suite attached, so she did not leave her 200-square-foot space for the full length of the quarantine.

“I was stuck in the bedroom and the only time the door was opened was for food,” said Oele. “When it was open I had to wear a mask and anything was allowed to come in, but nothing was allowed to leave, so I had garbage bags that I had sealed with my plastic cutlery and paper plates.”

Contracting COVID-19 turned Oele’s life upside down. She said the worst period was the Thursday and Friday after exposure.

“My fever was constant,” she said. “I’ve had bad flus in the past but I genuinely felt like I’d been in a car accident. It took everything out of me to just stand up and go to the bathroom. I was sleeping about 16 hours a day and the only thing that would wake me up was when my Advil wore off. I would have such a severe headache.”

On the following Saturday, just a little more than a week after exposure, she began to feel better, but the breathing difficulty intensified. She said she was so fortunate that she never got to the point where she was actually gasping for air. Breathing was laboured, although it never hurt. Oele said it felt like something was pushing on her chest.

She said going from being so physically fit to not being able to stand for more than five minutes was shocking and made breathing so much harder.

Recovery is a slow process and Oele, more than a month later, is still dealing with a lot of after-effects. She’s been out of quarantine almost three weeks nowand feels about 80 per cent. Oele said her taste receptors are pretty much gone, as is her sense of smell. She still has trouble taking long walks with her dog, and with any uphill or stairs, she has to take breaks.....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Pallister & co. say “We have to learn to live with the virus.” We say: not live with it your way!

As children return to schools, the fight for public health policy that puts people before corporate profit and government spending restraint must continue!

NDPP

Ontario Teacher Sounds Alarm as 30-Plus Students Pack Into Classroom (and radio)

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/ontario-teacher-sounds-alarm-as-30-...

"I have a bottle of hand sanitizer, some Lysol wipes, and I've got 32 students in a room..."

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Ontario Parent Action Network- Fighting for Public Education

You may have seen Conservative MPPs pumping out upbeat back-to-school social media videos featuring spotless classrooms and distanced desks. Videos like this one: https://twitter.com/vijaythanimpp/status/1303430115691565056

Turns out, they’re NOT using actual Ontario schools, but stock footage found on the internet that they’ve paid for with our tax dollars! Stock vid here: https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/group-of-children-with-face-mask-back-at-school-after-covid-19-quarantine-and-lockdown-learning-bklwiag3ukawwn9qu

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Safe September MB

This was what the inside of (just) one classroom in Manitoba looked like last week until local parents demanded support for teachers and improvements. This is what a not-equitabe, under-funded provincial back-to-school strategy creates. Keep raising your voices for a #SafeSeptemberMB - and beyond.

NDPP

'Teachers Are Being Laid Off So That Class Sizes of 27 Can Be Maintained'

https://twitter.com/colefwebber/status/1303539272201523200

"Today my classroom has been packed up. My position is now surplus. We have classrooms at full capacity while 10 others sit empty with teachers wishing they were still there! Shame on you Stephen Lecce and Rob Ford, this is on you! We have space and the people but no funds."

Politicians lie.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

Winnipeg has reported it's first student COVID-19 diagnosis of a child in Grade 7 who attends Churchill School (not sure if it's a junior high school or a K-8 school). The kid used public transport to get to school and followed all masking protocols.

Aristotleded24

There are definitely going to be high school students in different cohorts falling in love. That will make what is already a tumultous time that much more interesting, on top of the handwringing that has always been there about "excessive PDAs."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

UW-Madison Halts In-Person Classes After 1,000+ Students Test Positive for Coronavirus

In education news, the entire student bodies of Winona State University in Minnesota and Bradley University in Illinois have been ordered to quarantine for two weeks after coronavirus spread on their campuses, while the University of Wisconsin-Madison has canceled in-person classes after more than 1,000 people tested positive for COVID-19 just five days into the fall semester.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

There are definitely going to be high school students in different cohorts falling in love.

The pandemic is reshaping our sex lives. Is cybersex our future?

As school sex education programs have been cut back and replaced with an abstinence-only standard under the Trump-Pence administration, the LGBTQI community has picked up the slack developing curricula and resources to guide young adults into sex-positive and safe sex life choices.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Single 'retrospective' COVID-19 case validates Alberta's response to pandemic, top doctor says

quote:

Those cases include 24 reported at 21 schools across the province, Hinshaw said. There has been no evidence that the illness was transmitted inside any of those schools.

Three Alberta schools — Henry Wise Wood High School in Calgary. St. Wilfrid Elementary in Calgary and Chinook School in Lethbridge — have reported outbreaks.

According to AHS guidelines, an outbreak is defined as two or more confirmed cases at the same school within 14 days. Each school with an outbreak has reported two cases of the illness.

Hinshaw said she has heard Albertans' concerns about the length of time it currently takes to get test results back.

"We are working hard to streamline every facet of the testing and notification process to reduce wait times across the province," she said.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Today the Financial Accountability Office of Ontario released a report showing that Doug Ford is sitting on billions of unspent federal covid related funds.

Crowded classrooms will definitely fuel the second wave we are currently dealing with, potentially shutting down our economy.

We don't understand why Ford just won’t spend the money for smaller class sizes. Smaller class sizes will protect our kids, education workers and the economy.

Dear Doug, spend the money and protect Ontario.

Here's the full report for those who want to read it: https://www.fao-on.org/en/Blog/Publications/fed-prov-response-2020

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

School bus routes cancelled across Ontario as COVID-19 worsens driver shortage

School bus cancellations are piling up in Ontario, with transportation providers saying fears related to the COVID-19 pandemic are compounding an existing bus driver shortage across the industry.

Twelve bus routes were cancelled in both the Grey-Bruce and Thunder Bay regions as of Wednesday, with providers citing the pandemic and related health concerns as reasons for keeping drivers off the job.

In Sudbury, the student services consortium announced Monday that 23 routes will not run for at least the first week of school because not enough drivers returned to work.

Student Transportation Services of Thunder Bay says the average age of a bus driver in the area is 57 and many have decided to remain off the job due to age-related health risks from COVID-19.

The cancellations come weeks after concerns were raised by Unifor Local 4268, the union representing bus drivers, asking for better health and safety guidance for the industry....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..was only able to access this page via a private window

Coronavirus cases spike among school-age children in Florida, while state orders some counties to keep data hidden​

 One month into the forced reopening of Florida's schools, dozens of classrooms — along with some entire schools — have been temporarily shuttered because of coronavirus outbreaks, and infections among school-age children have jumped 34 percent. But parents in many parts of the state don't know if outbreaks of the virus are related to their own schools because the state ordered some counties to keep health data secret.

Volunteers across Florida have set up their own school-related coronavirus dashboards, and one school district is using Facebook after the county health department was told to stop releasing information about cases tied to local schools.

Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) has pushed aggressively for schools to offer in-person classes, even when Florida was the hot spot of the nation, and threatened to withhold funding if districts did not allow students into classrooms by Aug. 31. In the state guidelines for reopening schools, officials did not recommend that coronavirus cases be disclosed school by school. In fact, the DeSantis administration ordered some districts to stop releasing school specific coronavirus information, citing privacy issues.

quote:

Florida school districts began opening in early August, and by mid-month about half the state’s 4,500 public schools had students in their buildings. Three large districts were permitted to stay online because of high coronavirus infection rates — those of Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. Parents could choose between keeping their children at home or sending them to school, and about half of the states’s 2.8 million K-12 students opted to return to bricks-and-mortar classrooms.

Since Aug. 10, at least 1,210 students and teachers have been sent home to quarantine because they were exposed to the novel coronavirus, according to the Florida Education Association, the teachers union.

The Florida Department of Health reported that 10,513 children under age 18 have tested positive since schools started reopening for in-person teaching, an increase of 34 percent. The state is not saying how many of those children were in school or doing remote learning.

NDPP

University of Michigan Grad Students Set to Extend Strike as Opposition Grows to the US Back-to-School-Drive

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2020/09/12/stri-s12.html

"College and university campuses have emerged as a center of  both the expanding coronavirus pandemic in the US and opposition to the criminal and deadly policies of the ruling class. Among the striking students there is overwhelming support for continuing and broadening the struggle..."

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