The next British Columbia provincial election

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Aristotleded24

Ken Burch wrote:
I wonder if there might be a swing back to the BC Conservatives in the last week of the race, given that a BC Lib defeat now appears to be a virtual certainty and that, therefore the "if you're a 'free enterpriser', you HAVE to vote BC Liberal to kick the socialist barbarians back outside the gates" argument seems to be a moot point?

That realization was a major reason why the Socred vote collapsed into third place in '91, after all.

I'm wondering if there's an opening for Conservatives to pick up right-wing support by capitalizing on how tarnished the Liberal brand is. I kind of expected (either now or over the long term) that the Conservative brand would take off for that reason. That would also help with association to the brand of the federal Conservatives, who have a large amount of support in BC.

Ken Burch

Are there anymore televised debates between now and polling day?

jerrym

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:
I wonder if there might be a swing back to the BC Conservatives in the last week of the race, given that a BC Lib defeat now appears to be a virtual certainty and that, therefore the "if you're a 'free enterpriser', you HAVE to vote BC Liberal to kick the socialist barbarians back outside the gates" argument seems to be a moot point?

That realization was a major reason why the Socred vote collapsed into third place in '91, after all.

I'm wondering if there's an opening for Conservatives to pick up right-wing support by capitalizing on how tarnished the Liberal brand is. I kind of expected (either now or over the long term) that the Conservative brand would take off for that reason. That would also help with association to the brand of the federal Conservatives, who have a large amount of support in BC.

The Conservatives are only running 14 candidates, which is just under the 15 being run by the Libertarian Party. There are also 5 Christian Heritage and 5 Communists running. The relatively low number of Conservatives means it will be hard for them to build support. 

Aristotleded24

jerrym wrote:

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:
I wonder if there might be a swing back to the BC Conservatives in the last week of the race, given that a BC Lib defeat now appears to be a virtual certainty and that, therefore the "if you're a 'free enterpriser', you HAVE to vote BC Liberal to kick the socialist barbarians back outside the gates" argument seems to be a moot point?

That realization was a major reason why the Socred vote collapsed into third place in '91, after all.

I'm wondering if there's an opening for Conservatives to pick up right-wing support by capitalizing on how tarnished the Liberal brand is. I kind of expected (either now or over the long term) that the Conservative brand would take off for that reason. That would also help with association to the brand of the federal Conservatives, who have a large amount of support in BC.

The Conservatives are only running 14 candidates, which is just under the 15 being run by the Libertarian Party. There are also 5 Christian Heritage and 5 Communists running. The relatively low number of Conservatives means it will be hard for them to build support. 

What about over the longer term? Perhaps there is a Conservative MP who might be willing to take the plunge provincially?

jerrym

Aristotleded24 wrote:

jerrym wrote:

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:
I wonder if there might be a swing back to the BC Conservatives in the last week of the race, given that a BC Lib defeat now appears to be a virtual certainty and that, therefore the "if you're a 'free enterpriser', you HAVE to vote BC Liberal to kick the socialist barbarians back outside the gates" argument seems to be a moot point?

That realization was a major reason why the Socred vote collapsed into third place in '91, after all.

I'm wondering if there's an opening for Conservatives to pick up right-wing support by capitalizing on how tarnished the Liberal brand is. I kind of expected (either now or over the long term) that the Conservative brand would take off for that reason. That would also help with association to the brand of the federal Conservatives, who have a large amount of support in BC.

The Conservatives are only running 14 candidates, which is just under the 15 being run by the Libertarian Party. There are also 5 Christian Heritage and 5 Communists running. The relatively low number of Conservatives means it will be hard for them to build support. 

What about over the longer term? Perhaps there is a Conservative MP who might be willing to take the plunge provincially?

 

They tried that with John Cummins in 2013 and bumped their vote up to 85,743 from 34, 451 in 2009 but failed to elect a MLA and then fell back to 10,402 with no leader in 2017, although their 2,000+ votes in one riding helped narrowly elect an NDP by 200 votes. This lost seat prevented the Liberals from getting a majority of seats and led to the NDP-Green cooperation agreement and formation of a NDP government. There current leader, Tevor Bolin, is a fairly obscure northerner. Their last elected MLA was PC Vic Stephens in 1978. Their last MLA was Graham Lea, who crossed the floor to the PCs from the NDP for a few months before quitting politics in 1986. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conservative_Party_of_British_Columbia

bekayne

Aristotleded24 wrote:

jerrym wrote:

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:
I wonder if there might be a swing back to the BC Conservatives in the last week of the race, given that a BC Lib defeat now appears to be a virtual certainty and that, therefore the "if you're a 'free enterpriser', you HAVE to vote BC Liberal to kick the socialist barbarians back outside the gates" argument seems to be a moot point?

That realization was a major reason why the Socred vote collapsed into third place in '91, after all.

I'm wondering if there's an opening for Conservatives to pick up right-wing support by capitalizing on how tarnished the Liberal brand is. I kind of expected (either now or over the long term) that the Conservative brand would take off for that reason. That would also help with association to the brand of the federal Conservatives, who have a large amount of support in BC.

The Conservatives are only running 14 candidates, which is just under the 15 being run by the Libertarian Party. There are also 5 Christian Heritage and 5 Communists running. The relatively low number of Conservatives means it will be hard for them to build support. 

What about over the longer term? Perhaps there is a Conservative MP who might be willing to take the plunge provincially?

John Cummins tried that. It did not go well.

jerrym

Sonia Furstenau appears to have won the debate according to most commentators because of her comments on race but there were no knockout blows and Wilkinson appeared aloof and wooden.

Horgan defended the NDP record fairly well but slipped up in a major way on the race question for which he immediately apologized after the debate and today also. 

Wilkinson apologized for the sexist and racist comments made about NDP MLA Bowinn Ma that came after the release of a video showing 9 BC Liberal party candidates, including Wilkinson, laughing at sexist and misogynistic comments made about Ma by Liberal MLA Jane Thornewaite. However he failed to reply to the other classists and sexist commments that were included in the same question: (1) on the BC housing crisis where he said quoted "calling renting a “wacky time of life,” “fun,” “enjoyable” and a “rite of passage” to becoming mature; and (2) his calling domestic abuse a case of "a tough marriage".  Throughout the debate Wilkinson inserted the fact that he was doctor into nearly answer even if it appeared to have no relevance to the question and sometimes included the fact that he is also a lawyer, strongly indicating his hierarchical view of humanity that typified his patrician attitude to the debate. 

A 90-minute debate between John Horgan, Andrew Wilkinson and Sonia Furstenau, just 11 days before the provincial election, was mostly full of policy debates and mostly empty on overheated rhetoric. 

But while moderator Shachi Kurl got high marks on social media for keeping a brisk pace and informative tone to proceedings, it seemed none of the candidates were able to score one of those elusive "knockout blows" candidates hope for in a debate.

Which probably serves Horgan well — the NDP leader is comfortably up in the polls and, aside from a tendency to speed through his answers like he downed coffee beforehand, kept a generally even keel throughout.

The Green Party's Furstenau will probably consider Tuesday night's debate a success. Relatively unknown to British Columbians, she managed to land a few jabs on Horgan's decision to call a snap election, and sounded the least scripted of the leaders on a number of occasions. 

However, the leader who needed a game-changing debate the most was Wilkinson. And it's hard to imagine he comes out of the debate with the boost the B.C. Liberals seem to badly need. ...

Wilkinson's challenge going into the debate was obvious. Down in the polls, he needed to articulate his platform for British Columbia and explain why he would be a better leader of this province than Horgan. But he also needed to try to address the public perception of him as aloof and lacking empathy in a host of situations. ...

But it wasn't Horgan's motormouth or Wilkinson's roast comments that got the most immediate attention after the debate, but what they said — or failed to say — on unconscious bias and systemic racism.   

When asked how they each personally reckoned with their own privilege as white political leaders, Wilkinson told a story about being a doctor (for the fourth or fifth time in the debate) and that he delivered an Indigenous baby that was later named after him. 

For his part, Horgan said that growing up he played lacrosse with Indigenous youth, and that "for me, I did not see colour. I felt that everyone around me was the same."  Both Horgan and Wilkinson, after those somewhat confusing answers on privilege, then turned to attacking each other. It was left to Furstenau to talk about interactions people of colour have with the police, and to say, "We aren't all equal. I wish we were, but we're not."   

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/election-debate-2020-bc-...

jerrym

While Wilkinson only apologized for his party's sexist comments on NDP MLA Bowinn Ma, and failed to address his classist comments on renting and his sexist comments on domestic abuse mentioned in the last post, Horgan once again apologized today for failing to recognize white privlege during the debate. He also said he is willing to discuss this issue throughout the rest of the campaign because of its importance.

Once again Wilkinson failed to address the issue today.

At one point, he said he doesn't "see colour," a response which drew criticism from many who see the often-used phrase as minimizing the challenges racism presents.

After the debate, Horgan apologized for the language he chose.

"This is the answer I wish I gave on stage," he wrote on Twitter, posting a video of a redo of his answer.

He described his comments as a mischaracterization and as inappropriate.

"Saying 'I don't see colour' causes pain and makes people feel unseen. I'm sorry," he wrote.

"I'll never fully understand, as a white person, the lived reality of systemic racism. I'm listening, learning, and I'll keep working every day to do better."

Many reacted with positive messages, but others were critical of his apology

- The leader of B.C.'s New Democrats is apologizing for an answer he gave during the only televised debate of the 2020 provincial election.

The leaders of three major parties – all of whom are white – were asked during the debate Tuesday about white privilege.

John Horgan's response at the time was to outline a childhood that included playing sports and attending classes with a diverse group of people. ...

This is the answer I wish I gave on stage. Saying "I don’t see colour" causes pain and makes people feel unseen. I’m sorry. I’ll never fully understand, as a white person, the lived reality of systemic racism. I’m listening, learning, and I’ll keep working every day to do better. pic.twitter.com/Rbr7h0JOyh

— John Horgan (@jjhorgan) October 14, 2020

https://bc.ctvnews.ca/the-answer-i-wish-i-gave-b-c-ndp-leader-apologizes...

Ken Burch

He's pretty much done everything he could to address this, and nothing he said justifies denying the NDP a majority.

Aristotleded24

Ken Burch wrote:
He's pretty much done everything he could to address this, and nothing he said justifies denying the NDP a majority.

Sounds like Horgan misspoke on something that the mainstream is beginning to undertand, even if that understanding or expression of understanding is not perfect. That to me doesn't rise to the level of Wilkinson's comments, which reveal an elitism and tone-deafness to economic concerns of average people and callous disregard for issues of domestic violence.

jerrym

ETA: Liberal candidate Laurie Throness has had his resignation accepted by Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson after controversial comments comparing the NDP’s free birth control plan to eugenics. The question is why didn't the Liberals fire him rather than allow him to resign? If Throness wins, will the party accept him back after he mumbles some neutral sounding statement on the issue and Wilkinson says that's OK because the people voted for him?

 It is too late for the Liberals to replace his name on the ballot, so it could give the NDP a chance to win the riding of Chiliwack-Kent in the Fraser Valley Bible Belt. There is no Conservative candidate running in the riding although there are Green, Liberterian and Independent candidates. Gwen Mahoney won the riding in a byelection for the NDP in 2011, the only NDP victory ever in this riding, when the Liberals were very unpopular and the Liberals and Conservatives split the vote.

Earlier in 2020 Throness had faced criticism for advertising in a Christian fundamentalist magazine that opposed school programs to make school more inclusive and safer for LGBTQ students, even after BC Liberal leader Wilkinson said the party would no longer advertise in the magazine. The NDP had asked the Liberals to toss him from the Liberal party at that point but Wilkinson refused to fire him then. 

BC Liberal Leader Andrew Wilkinson accepted the resignation of controversial Chilliwack-Kent candidate Laurie Throness Thursday. The move came following outcry over comments Throness made at an all-candidates debate earlier this week comparing the NDP’s free birth control plan to eugenics.

Wilkinson said Throness accepted that his comments were inappropriate, but that it was clear he couldn’t stay with the party.

“This is a party that tries to tolerate a range of views. There’s a party position that is my own position on things like discrimination and contraception, and Mr. Throness reached a point where his views are no longer compatible with mine or the party,” Wilkinson said. “It’s critical that we all understand that access to contraception is a very important issue in our society, and we as a party and I as a person fully endorse the idea of free contraception for people who need it for their health care in British Columbia.” ...

Reached by text message, Throness said he needed to take some time to think about whether he will still seek election. Either way, he will still appear on the ballot under the BC Liberal banner.

Throness’ comments on eugenics, a movement that promotes selective human breeding to weed out characteristics seen as undesirable, were captured in a Zoom recording of the Wednesday event, where he added contraception was a low priority among medical spending.

“The other thing that I feel about this is that it contains a whiff of the old eugenics thing where poor people shouldn’t have babies and so we can’t force them to have contraception so we’ll give it to them for free,” he said. “And maybe they’ll have fewer babies so there will be fewer poor people in the future. And to me, that contains an odour that I don’t like and so I don’t really support what the NDP is doing there and that’s my answer.” ...

Earlier Thursday, the NDP called for Wilkinson to fire Throness, arguing his comments fit in with a pattern of previous remarks regarding the LGBTQ2 community, including defending conversion therapy. ...

“(It) demonstrates just how out of touch he is and his party is,” said NDP Coquitlam-Maillardville candidate Selina Robinson. “He’s from a different century as far as I’m concerned and I think as far as British Columbians are concerned. He is outdated and it’s harmful to people.”

The political reaction didn’t just come from the NDP. Prior to Throness’ resignation from the party, a number of BC Liberal candidates took to social media to pillory his comments.

On Thursday evening, party membership chair Nicole Paul posted a multi-tweet thread outlining longstanding concerns about Throness and taking direct aim at Wilkinson’s leadership. “I continue to stand by the values of free enterprise that originally drew me to this party. The BC Liberal Party under Andrew Wilkinson does not reflect values I support,” she wrote. “I am pleased to see Laurie Throness will no longer be a candidate or caucus member, this is action that any reasonable leader would have acted on months, if not years ago.”

On Sunday, B.C.’s New Democrats promised free prescription contraception if re-elected, saying the move will save residents money and advance gender equality.

Earlier this year, Throness faced criticism for advertising in a free Christian lifestyle publication after concerns were raised that the magazine published multiple editorials opposed to SOGI 123, the provincial program to help educators make schools more inclusive and safe for students of all sexual orientations and gender identities.

In July, Wilkinson announced the party would no longer advertise in Light Magazine. At the time, Throness insisted he would continue to advertise in the magazine, but eventually stopped. The incident prompted the New Democrats to call for the MLA to be tossed from caucus.

https://globalnews.ca/news/7399484/bc-election-liberal-laurie-throness-b...

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

Ken Burch wrote:

He's pretty much done everything he could to address this, and nothing he said justifies denying the NDP a majority.

Nothing he said on this issue justifies denying the NDP a majority. However, given the NDP's awful positions on Site C, facking/LNG, indigenous land rights, and TXM (despite Horgan saying that the NDP still opposes the pipeline, his government has dropped any attempts to stop the project, without taking back the BC Liberals decision to not require the project to pass a provincial environmental assessment process), I'd prefer for the BC Green Party to win enough seats to keep the BC NDP to a minority, and for the BC NDP and BC Liberals to not win a majority of seats between them (so they can't ignore the BC Green Party on the environment).

It's not likely to happen, but I'd still prefer it. Though having said that, I still voted by mail for incumbent BC NDP MLA Raj Chouhan in my riding of Burnaby-Edmonds, since at the time I sent in my ballot (Oct 5) the Green Party candidate appeared to be nothing more than a name on the ballot (no photo on the BC Green Party website, no campaign infrastructure). Also looked like they might have worked as an insurance broker (based on my Google search), which doesn't exactly inspire confidence as to any progressive bonafides (couldn't be a hundred percent sure it was the same person).

Ken Burch

Left Turn wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:

He's pretty much done everything he could to address this, and nothing he said justifies denying the NDP a majority.

Nothing he said on this issue justifies denying the NDP a majority. However, given the NDP's awful positions on Site C, facking/LNG, indigenous land rights, and TXM (despite Horgan saying that the NDP still opposes the pipeline, his government has dropped any attempts to stop the project, without taking back the BC Liberals decision to not require the project to pass a provincial environmental assessment process), I'd prefer for the BC Green Party to win enough seats to keep the BC NDP to a minority, and for the BC NDP and BC Liberals to not win a majority of seats between them (so they can't ignore the BC Green Party on the environment).

It's not likely to happen, but I'd still prefer it. Though having said that, I still voted by mail for incumbent BC NDP MLA Raj Chouhan in my riding of Burnaby-Edmonds, since at the time I sent in my ballot (Oct 5) the Green Party candidate appeared to be nothing more than a name on the ballot (no photo on the BC Green Party website, no campaign infrastructure). Also looked like they might have worked as an insurance broker (based on my Google search), which doesn't exactly inspire confidence as to any progressive bonafides (couldn't be a hundred percent sure it was the same person).

I entirely understand.  It's also and epic tragedy that the BC Ecosocialists shot themselves in the foot at the start of the campaign.  If I'd had my druthers, I'd have preferred to see THAT party end up with the balance of power in the legislature.

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

Ken Burch wrote:
I entirely understand.  It's also and epic tragedy that the BC Ecosocialists shot themselves in the foot at the start of the campaign.  If I'd had my druthers, I'd have preferred to see THAT party end up with the balance of power in the legislature.

Totally. Though that was also far less likely to happen, even if the BC Ecosocialists had run candidates.

jerrym

Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson is receiving indirect fire from some of his own party candidates through criticism of his handling of the Laurie Throness MLA resignation by allowing the issue to grow in the social media following Throness's controversial comments comparing the NDP’s free birth control plan to eugenics. This follows NDP criticism of Throness earlier this year for advertising in a Christian fundamentalist magazine that opposed school programs to make school more inclusive and safer for LGBTQ students, even after BC Liberal leader Wilkinson said the party would no longer advertise in the magazine. Wilkinson has also faced public criticism for doing nothing about North Vancouver-Seymour's Jane Thornthwaite’s sexist comments regarding New Democrat Bowinn Ma and about another candidate, Langley East's Margaret Kunst, who opposed the painting of a rainbow crosswalk to symbolize support of LGBTQ rights in Langley, another part of the Fraser Valley Bible Belt that is becoming more metro as Vancouver suburbs continue to grow outward. 

When the latest outrage regarding B.C. Liberal Laurie Throness surfaced Thursday, some party members wondered if Leader Andrew Wilkinson would finally do what needed to be done.

Those Liberals were already seething at what they regarded as the leader’s double standard in dealing with Jane Thornthwaite’s sexist comments regarding New Democrat Bowinn Ma. ...

While Wilkinson didn’t hesitate to throw Thornthwaite under the bus, he’d passed up opportunities to do the same with Laurie Throness, the unreconstructed social conservative running for re-election in Chilliwack. ...

Throness was unrepentant about placing advertising in a magazine that promotes conversion therapy for homosexuals. ...

But Wilkinson had replied to all questions about Throness (and another candidate who’d opposed a rainbow crosswalk) by offering the supposed reassurance that members of his own family “are gay and lesbian.” Had he asked those family members how they felt about the aforementioned two candidates for his party? Wilkinson replied Tuesday that LGBTQ+ rights were a topic of conversation, “and it’s understood in my family that there’s work to be done.”

There matters stood until Thursday, when social media came alive with reports of what Throness had said about the NDP proposal for publicly funded contraception.

“It contains a whiff of the old eugenics thing,” he told an online all-candidates meeting the night before. “Where, you know, poor people shouldn’t have babies. And so we can’t force them to have contraception so we’ll give it to them for free. So there will be fewer poor people in future.”

Wilkinson, who’d held off for three days in providing a full accounting on the Thornthwaite comments, responded more quickly this time. ...

The New Democrats lost no time putting the boot in. “What is it going to take for Wilkinson to fire him?” challenged cabinet minister Selina Robinson. Judging from the early afternoon postings on social media, some Liberals had clearly had enough.

“Appalling,” said Jas Johal, in a tough fight to hold onto his Richmond seat.

“Repugnant,” said Todd Stone, a once and perhaps future leadership candidate.

“Awful,” said Trevor Halford, running in Surrey White Rock.

“Contemptible and deeply offensive,” added Matt Pitcairn, running for the Liberals in another of the Richmond ridings. “I will not stand by and abide such remarks.”

Finally, Wilkinson made it official. “Yesterday, Mr. Laurie Throness made statements that are not in keeping with values of the B.C. Liberal party or my own values,” he told reporters. ...

A statement from party headquarters added: “Laurie Throness has accepted that his comments were wrong and inappropriate. It was clear he couldn’t remain part of the Liberal team. The B.C. Liberal Party is dedicated to a diversity of perspectives, but all party members are dedicated to inclusiveness and equality — that is not up for debate.”

Except maybe in Langley East, where Margaret Kunst, who opposed the rainbow crosswalk, remains the candidate.

https://vancouversun.com/opinion/columnists/vaughn-palmer-wilkinson-fina...

kropotkin1951

Ken Burch wrote:

I wonder if there might be a swing back to the BC Conservatives in the last week of the race, given that a BC Lib defeat now appears to be a virtual certainty and that, therefore the "if you're a 'free enterpriser', you HAVE to vote BC Liberal to kick the socialist barbarians back outside the gates" argument seems to be a moot point?

That realization was a major reason why the Socred vote collapsed into third place in '91, after all.

The voters in '91 voted for a party running as a left liberal alternative to the demonized NDP. The right wing neo-cons stayed with the Socreds. The NDP actually decreased in that election because some of their voters voted BC Liberal before it was controlled by Howe Street. The NDP will never let that happen now, they are firmly a left liberal party and they likely will pick up the federal Liberal wing of the BC Liberal party.

jerrym

Andrew Wilkinson is now coming under direct fire from his own party over failing to deal with Liberal MLA for Chiliwack Kent Laurie Throness.

BC Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson has accepted the resignation of a BC Liberal candidate after several BC Liberal candidates broke rank and publicly condemned their colleague’s socially conservative views on social media.

Nicole Paul, the membership chair for the BC Liberals, tweeted that she had been arguing that “the views of Laurie Throness do not belong in our party” for the “last five months. The BC Liberal Party under Andrew Wilkinson does not reflect values I support,” Paul tweeted. As membership chair for the BC Liberal Party I have been fighting internally for the last 5 months at the board table saying that the views of Laurie Throness do not belong in our party. ...

Wilkinson said Throness “resigned voluntarily” on Thursday following comments the BC Liberal candidate for Chilliwack-Kent made at an all-candidates meeting the night before comparing contraception to “old eugenics” programs.

Thursday afternoon,  CityNews reported Throness remarked during the virtual debate that contraception “contains a whiff of the old eugenics thing where poor people shouldn’t have babies”. ...

However, other BC Liberal candidates offered more strongly worded responses than their leader to Throness’ remarks.

BC Liberal candidate Jas Johal called Throness’ comments “appalling” and said they were contrary to “BC Liberal values,” a view echoed by another BC Liberal candidate, Karen Bill. ...

Another BC Liberal candidate, Matt Pitcairn, agreed Throness’ comments were “totally unacceptable.” He added: “I will not stand by and abide such remarks.” In another tweet, Pitcairn wrote: “If Laurie Throness does not immediately retract these remarks, then he can expect a major fight with me on these issues.”  ...

BC Liberal candidate Trevor Halford said “My wife, daughter and the women of BC deserve better than these comments.” ...

Three hours after his initial response, Wilkinson announced Throness had “voluntarily resigned” as the BC Liberal candidate for Chilliwack-Kent but would not say if he had been forcibly remove Throness from the party. ...

Despite speaking out against Throness’ views on Thursday, Wilkinson and other BC Liberal candidates have long allowed Throness to remain in the party despite his well-documented history of opposing women’s reproductive rights and taking hardline anti-LGBTQ positions.

Since his election as a BC Liberal MLA in 2013, Throness:

https://pressprogress.ca/bc-liberal-candidate-resigns-as-andrew-wilkinso...

jerrym

 ETA: Today another Liberal candidate, Lorraine Breett who is running in the New Westminster riding (my riding), faces demands that she resign, over her support for anti-transgender novelist J K Rowling. During Lorraine Brett's campaign for the Liberals in 2017 she said that New Westminster voters were stupid for voting NDP, in one of the strongest NDP ridings in the country. What happened? She dropped the Liberal vote from 33% in 2013 to 21% and fell to third behind the Greens who climbed from 8% to 25% as those who couldn't stomach voting NDP ended up voting Green and the NDP won with 52%. I guess Brett and the Liberals still think the voters are stupid. 

Brett's comments this year led to this news leading the local TV news coverage as the Liberals face an ongoing barrage of criticism over: his failure to apologize when questioned during the debate for his 2019 on the BC housing crisis where he said quoted "calling renting a “wacky time of life,” “fun,” “enjoyable” and a “rite of passage” to becoming mature and his calling domestic abuse a case of "a tough marriage", although he did apologize for the sexist comments made about NDP MLA Bowinn Ma that came after the release of a video showing 9 BC Liberal party candidates, including Wilkinson, laughing at sexist and misogynistic comments made about Ma by Liberal MLA Jane Thornewaite; and Laurie Throness's numerous comments and actions listed at the end of the last post as well as appearing in a video with another 8 Liberal candidates who failed to criticize Thorness's comments comparing NDP’s free birth control plan to eugenics.

The day after Laurie Throness resigned from the Liberal caucus over his eugenics comments, New Westminster candidate Lorraine Brett is feeling the political heat.

In a tweet from a now-deleted account, Brett called the Harry Potter author’s blog “JK Rowling’s best work!” ....

Rowling has been criticized for her comments about transgender people, claiming “trans activism” is harming women.

Brett addresses controversial tweet

On Friday, after Brett’s controversial tweet was brought to light, she took to Twitter to address the matter.

However, she did not apologize for her earlier post.

“I responded to a piece by JK Rowling that was based on her own personal experiences and drew much attention,” she says in a pair of tweets.

“I think it’s important to hear different ideas in a fair and open society. The BC Liberals have been unequivocal in our support for the LBGTQ community and … worked hard to advance an agenda that builds a better and more tolerant British Columbia. I am running as a BC Liberal because I share these views.” ...

The NDP’s Selina Robinson, who is running in the Coquitlam-Maillardville riding, has called on BC Liberal Leader Andrew Wilkinson to fire Brett. She’s also called for him to fire Langley East candidate Margaret Kunst who, as a Langley Township councillor, voted against a rainbow crosswalk.

https://www.citynews1130.com/2020/10/16/bc-liberal-candidate-under-fire-...

jerrym

The first poll after the televised debate shows the NDP leading at 49% and a 16% lead, while the Liberals are at 33% and the Greens at 14%. However, Green leader Sonia Furstenau at 46% has surged to second place behind Horgan's 54% in voter appeal, leaving Wilkinson trailing with 24%. With regard to the debate 29% said Horgan won, 23% said Furstenau won and 15% said Wilkinson won. An important factor in what happens during the last week of the campaign is that "voters are motivated equally by blocking the party they dislike (52%) versus a party they truly support (48%)." It could affect whether the NDP win a majority and how big it is, how many seats the Liberals are likely to lose, and if the Greens translate their leader's likability into seats. 

With a week to go before the final day of voting on October 24, the BC NDP continues to hold a double-digit lead (49%) over the second-place BC Liberals (33%). The Greens, at 14 per cent, remain stuck in third place with a less committed vote base than the other parties. However, with the Green leader’s momentum surging, it is worth noting the party is the most common second choice for voters who have not yet locked in their choice. ...

While the debate was likely informative and helpful for many, the appeal of each leader also tells an important story. The narrative for the BC Liberals is particularly damaging. Just one-quarter of British Columbians say they find Andrew Wilkinson appealing, half as many as who say the same of Sonia Furstenau, and far fewer than John Horgan.

...

With the backing of half of British Columbians (49%), the BC NDP enjoys a 16-point lead in voter support over the BC Liberals (33%). Much of this is built on the party’s strength in Metro Vancouver, where 60 per cent of residents say they will vote for the incumbents.

The BC Green Party is preferred by 14 per cent of voters, with less support in the Fraser Valley (9%) and more (22%) in the Island and North Coast region.

There are notable demographic differences as well. Men aged 35-54 (35%) are less likely than the rest of the population to support the NDP. However, women of the same age are more likely to support them. The inverse is true of the Liberals, who have the support of nearly half (46%) of men aged 35-54, but only one-quarter (23%) of women that age.

The Greens are slightly less popular with men 55 and older, with one-in-ten planning to vote for them. By contrast, one-quarter of women aged 18-34 support the Greens, nearly twice the overall average.

http://angusreid.org/bc-election-post-debate/

NorthReport
NDPP

Welcome back NR. Somewhat more neoliberal than Davey B's bunch dontcha think?

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

Article in The Tyee by Kelly Tatham, Green Party candidate in Vancouver-Mount Pleasant.

The Homelessness Crisis Is Not ‘Complicated’

Quote:

We keep talking about the symptoms of homelessness as if it were the sickness. We keep talking about the expressions of the problem instead of the root. It’s true the symptoms are complicated, but the root of the problem is not complicated. It’s simple: colonialism.

Homelessness is a characteristic of a society where land has been commodified and privatized to the point of mass exclusion. When settlers arrived here, they claimed land as their own, drew up documents and boundaries, and implemented a legal system and police force to regulate and enforce the boundaries they created.

Then came the profit motive. Not only did settlers steal what didn’t belong to them, they charged access for it. This colonial economic system of capitalism separated housing from being a “basic human right” to something you must “earn.” This is how white settlers created the neoliberal-colonialist model that prioritizes accumulation of capital — and it continues today.

What will solve the problem is having the conversation on what it looks like to give “land back” and then following through with it. What will solve the problem will be removing the profit incentive from human rights like housing, and abolishing laws that punish individuals for simply trying to survive in a system that has oppressed, degraded and marginalized them. What will solve the problem is shifting from an economy that drives wealth inequality to one that facilitates individual and community growth.

jerrym

A second post-debate poll, this from Insights West, shows similar results to previous polls. 

Following the October 13, 2020 BC provincial election leadership debate, Insights West’s election poll shows that despite the controversy over Premier Horgan’s comments about white privilege, he is widely seen by most to have had the upper hand in the debate still enjoys a commanding lead in the latter stages of the election race.

Since Insights West’s poll in the first week of the campaign, the dip in support that the BC NPD saw following the announcement of the snap election has been regained and they maintain a comfortable lead despite a small gain by the BC Liberals. The BC NDP has increased their lead from 42% of decided voters to 47%, back to the same levels as in June. The BC Liberals have also made small gains and have captured 33% of decided voters, up four points since late September, while the Greens have dipped slightly to 14% (down 2 points) and the BC Conservative vote stands at 6%. The undecided vote has narrowed to 15% from 20% earlier in the campaign, and of this group, intentions still lean towards BC NDP (15%), followed by the BC Liberals (12%); the BC Greens and the BC Conservative Party are both at 5%; while the remaining 63% are either truly not sure still (34%) or preferred not to answer (28%).

This poll is no different from the last several, where we have found the BC NDP leading in nearly every demographic and regional category, from males (40%), females (54%), and voters of different ages (51% of 18-34 years, 49% of 35-54 years , and 42% of 55+ years) and nearly every region in the province (City of Vancouver at 56%, rest of Metro Vancouver at 47%, and Vancouver Island at 53%; the rest of BC has the Liberals leading the BC NDP slightly at 41% to 37%). ...

Although COVID-19 remains firmly entrenched as the number one issue on voter’s minds, post-debate it has dropped slightly from 38% to 32% who consider it the number one issue facing our province today. The economy and jobs together have risen slightly (17%, up 2 points), while housing prices/affordability has held steady (13%). Concerns about the environment have risen slightly (9%, up 2 points), while healthcare (5%), homelessness (5%), and the opioid crisis (4%) have also held basically steady. Currently, BC Liberal voters place a higher priority on economy and jobs (34%) than BC NDP voters (8%) and BC Green voters (8%). ...

The debate itself doesn’t appear to change the expected course and final election outcome, but based on the results there are a couple of interesting surprises. As expected with the sizeable lead that he has in voter intentions, it is perhaps no surprise that John Horgan was seen to perform the best during the debate: 53% of British Columbians who saw/listened to the debate or read about it later rate his performance as either “good” (35%) or “very good” (18%) and he was chosen by most (28%) over other candidates to be the winner. As expected, his own constituents rated him most highly (80% “very good” or “good”), with 59% of BC NPD voters selecting him as the outright winner. BC Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson performed nowhere nearly as well, with only 36% rating him as either “good” (25%) or “very good” (11%), and much fewer picking him as the debate winner (14%). More significant however, is the fact that a very small proportion (39%) of his own voters say he was the winner of the debate. 

Considering that Sonia Furstenau has only captured 14% of the decided vote, her debate performance was very strong, with 48% believing she did either a “good” (30%) or “very good” (18%) job during the debate itself. Further, 14% of British Columbians felt she won the debate, the same number as Andrew Wilkinson. ...

“Despite a couple of fumbles by the BC NDP and BC Liberals though this campaign, and the leadership debate, it doesn’t appear that these snafus have impacted the direction of the overall campaign” says Steve Mossop, President of Insights West. “And despite earlier concerns about Horgan’s snap election call, it appears as though his stellar handling of COVID-19 pandemic response, and high approval ratings throughout the summer will carry him through to the final week of the campaign with a likely positive outcome for him and his party.”

https://www.insightswest.com/news/post-election-debate-oct-2020/

jerrym

Here are the latest poll averages and seat projections. 

Here is the latest 338Canada British Columbia projection update. You may find all B.C. polls listed on this page.

Unsurprisingly, the B.C. NDP leads the way with an average of just under 50 per cent in the popular vote projection. With such numbers, the NDP stands comfortably in majority territory, as we will see below:

With such levels of support, the NDP wins on average 56 seats, 12 seats clear of the majority threshold of 44 seats:

The B.C. Liberals are in second place with an average of 36 per cent. The Greens stand at 13 per cent. Although the Libertarian Party of B.C. is running 25 candidates (the most outside of the main three parties), it is not possible to include them in these projections because we have no clear polling data with this party (the Libertarians are included with the “other” option).

With such levels of support, the NDP wins on average 56 seats, 12 seats clear of the majority threshold of 44 seats:

The B.C. Liberals win an average of 30 seats and the Greens, 2 seats. ....

At the district level, the NDP can currently count on an unusually high floor or 37 safe seats (“safe” here means a party wins more than 99 per cent of simulations). Should those safe NDP districts go as projected, then the NDP would only have to win 7 of the 17 remaining districts they are currently projected as favourites to win a majority:

One quick word on the Chilliwack-Kent district: last night, it was announced that current B.C. Liberal MLA Laurie Throness had resigned as a candidate for comments he made comparing contraception to eugenics. Since advanced voting has already begun and it is too late for Elections B.C. to reprint the ballots, his name will remain on the ballot in Chilliwack-Kent as a B.C. Liberal candidate. However, how will voters in this electoral district react to his resignation?

Without targeted micro-local polling, there is no way to empirically find out. Before his resignation, Throness was the favoured candidate in Chilliwack-Kent, but his NDP challenger stood only 7 points behind on average.

https://www.macleans.ca/politics/338canada-election-projection-the-sinki...

 

jerrym

Below are the individual seat projections from Macleans:

We will continue to follow the British Columbia numbers daily all the way to election day on Oct. 24. To find your home district, use this list of all 87 electoral districts, or visit the regional pages below:

https://www.macleans.ca/politics/338canada-election-projection-the-sinki...

jerrym

Horgan has been attacking both Wilkinson and the Liberal record during the campaign in order to try to avoid Adrian Dix's mistake of running a positive campaign with a 20% lead until it was too late to reverse the collapsing NDP vote, thereby losing the election. Instead, Horgan has been criticizing the Liberals on specific issues and offering a program that attempts to deal with the problem created by the isssue. You can argue that he has not done enough, especially with regard to climate change, but as a campaign strategy his approach has been effective.

Premier John Horgan has been starting most days on the election campaign by flagging the failings of the previous B.C. Liberal government as much as the accomplishments of his own. Horgan announced Thursday that, if re-elected, the New Democrats would increase access for low- and middle-income post-secondary students to grants of up to $4,000.

Then the reminder of the record of his B.C. Liberal opponent, Andrew Wilkinson: “The B.C. Liberals cancelled needs-based grants and tripled the cost of an education while Andrew Wilkinson was a top government insider and then-cabinet minister.”

Wednesday the NDP leader announced the recent wage top-up for workers in the long-term care sector would be made permanent. The $10 million a month additional payout was crafted to implement a “single-site policy,” ending the practice where workers would shuttle among several facilities to supplement their earnings. The practice was blamed for helping to spread COVID-19 to more than one long-term care facility. ...

“Sixteen long years of B.C. Liberal neglect left long-term care homes dangerously understaffed and front line workers underpaid,” he declared. “Our plan builds on the progress we’ve made to keep seniors healthy and safe, through the pandemic and beyond. The B.C. Liberals changed laws to allow privatization and cuts while underpaying staff and making them work in several facilities,” added Jinny Sims, seeking re-election for the B.C. NDP in Surrey-Panorama. “That contributed to outbreaks, making the pandemic worse.”

Tuesday, Horgan campaigned in the Tri-Cities region, announcing plans to build a modern middle school and high school on Burke Mountain in Coquitlam. But he also had a talking point regarding his opponent. “Families on Burke Mountain have waited years for new schools because the old B.C. Liberal government put the interests of their wealthy and well-connected friends before kids,” said Horgan. “When Andrew Wilkinson was minister of citizens’ services, he sold 14 lots designated for schools and hospitals in Burke Mountain to a wealthy developer — for $43 million less than their appraised value,” the NDP release continued.

“When Wilkinson ran for leader, that same developer rewarded him with $15,000 in donations.” The NDP onslaught of reminders of the B.C. Liberal record has put Wilkinson on the defensive more often than not. “The NDP blame game is getting tired for everybody,” he complained Wednesday.

But at the same time he had to admit the New Democrats had got it right by repudiating the B.C. Liberals’ hard-line treatment of staff in long-term care. “We need those workers,” said Wilkinson. “We need those people to be taking care of our seniors. They need to be compensated so they can do the job safely working in a single facility.” Many of those workers were women and more than a few were Indo-Canadians. I doubt Wilkinson’s belated acknowledgment will alter voting intentions with them or their families. ...

The New Democrats even managed to make the Liberal record an issue when Wilkinson took the wraps off his vow to scrap the seven per cent provincial sales tax (PST) for one year and cap it at three per cent for a second year. Sales taxes have long been recognized as regressive because they take a larger share from low- and middle-income earners than from those at the higher levels.

But the New Democrats, drawing on a well-worn stereotype about the Liberals, portrayed the move as a tax break for buyers of yachts and other luxury goods. They also riffed on the Liberal record in government, when a hefty income tax cut in 2001 eventually led to budget-balancing spending cuts in social services. Wilkinson struggled to clarify that this week’s promise regarding the PST was a populist tax cut, aimed at middle-income British Columbians, and that he had no intention of cutting program spending during a pandemic.

But it was a struggle because there was no plausible way for Wilkinson to separate himself from the B.C. Liberal record. He was a former party president, a senior public servant in the Gordon Campbell Liberal government and a cabinet minister in the Christy Clark Liberal government. 

There’s no overlooking his personal luggage stickers in the lengthy baggage train that the B.C. Liberals are dragging behind them in this election.

https://vancouversun.com/opinion/columnists/vaughn-palmer-horgan-making-...

NorthReport

6 more days till E day.

How much more damage can the Liberals do to themselves before Saturday, October 24?

https://www.straight.com/news/harm-reduction-advocate-garth-mullins-dema...

NorthReport

Another Ottawa failure

Horgan promises to double funding for revitalization of B.C.'s wild salmon stocks

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/horgan-promises-to-doubl...

NorthReport

Horgan seems to be on the correct track.

By Christmas, eh.

Sweet!

 

B.C. Election 2020: Horgan says NDP would try to get COVID-19 relief cash out by Christmas

An NDP-led legislature could reconvene this fall to deliver on campaign promises, like COVID-19 relief benefits.

https://vancouversun.com/news/politics/bc-election/horgan-says-ndp-would...

(tks Misfit, nice to hear from you, and see that you are still around here)

NorthReport

Where's the CBC's "A devastating poll for the Liberals, a bitter pill for Wilkinson to swallow" headline, eh! Just askin'

NorthReport

Horgan is getting a bum rap. Remember Horgan didn't start the Site C project, and he opposed this project as well, and legally did everything he could to stop it.

 

https://www.kamloopsthisweek.com/news/horgan-says-disruptions-from-prote...

NorthReport

B.C. Conservative leader says B.C. Liberal leak of WorkSafeBC report shows party is worried

The B.C. Liberal Party called on B.C. Conservative Leader Trevor Bolin to answer for how he, as a business owner, handled a case of sexual harassment among his employees in 2018.

https://www.kamloopsthisweek.com/news/b-c-conservative-leader-says-b-c-l...

NorthReport

Why would any Liberal candidates get elected on the North Shore as they were all in on the video where the Liberal North Vancouver-Capilano MLA and candidate used blatant sexism to attack Bowinn Ma?

I know, I know, the CBC once again, forgot to mention this.

Apart from Thornthwaite, Kirkpatrick is in on it, Sturdy is in on it, Wilkinson is in on it, and even Kevin Falcon, who has Liberal leadership aspirations was in on it as well.

https://www.nsnews.com/i-want-to-apologize-to-bowinn-ma-wilkinson-1.2421...

 

NorthReport

Oh my goodness - what a trainwreck!

The Woes of Andrew Wilkinson

People describe him as smart, educated and capable. But the BC Liberal leader has struggled in the campaign and faces growing internal criticism.

 

The Tyee made repeated requests for an interview with BC Liberal Leader Andrew Wilkinson starting in the first week of the campaign, but he has been unavailable. Photo by Darryl Dyck, the Canadian Press.

The first impression that BC Liberal Leader Andrew Wilkinson made on Sam Klein-Laufer was so strong that it still stings seven years later.

“I just despise Andrew Wilkinson,” said Klein-Laufer, now 24 and a student at the University of British Columbia. “He was rude, he was elitist, just absolutely awful.”

In 2013 Wilkinson was a new candidate running for election in Vancouver-Quilchena, a wealthy constituency and BC Liberal stronghold. Klein-Laufer was a Grade 11 student moderating a debate that he and other students had organized for the candidates at Magee Secondary School. 

On the topic of housing affordability Wilkinson offered no solutions, instead advising students they better become doctors and lawyers, Klein-Laufer recalled, a position that came off as unhelpful and elitist. When there were technical issues with the sound system, he said, Wilkinson became angry and accused the students of censoring him.

“All in all, he talked down to the audience,” said Klein-Laufer, who pays attention to politics but isn’t involved in any partisan way. “He just kind of had this air of ‘I’m better than you.’ For someone who’s got two graduate degrees, it’s amazing some of the things that come out of his mouth.”

https://thetyee.ca/News/2020/10/19/Andrew-Wilkinson-Woes/

 

 

kropotkin1951

The BC Liberal's are crashing and burning. Here is an awesome broadside from Bowinn Ma.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVgC1UUk5qQ&feature=emb_logo

NorthReport

I like Bill Tieleman, but democracy is very important to me, so there is one issue that I don't agree with him on, and that is PR.

A Word to Progressives Who Want to Punish the NDP

Mad they called an election or furthered Site C? Please don’t act impulsively.

Bill Tieleman Today | TheTyee.ca

Bill Tieleman is a former NDP strategist whose government relations and political consulting clients include unions and businesses in the resource, health, tourism and public sector. He was a columnist for The Tyee. Email Bill,tweet @BillTieleman or visit his blog.

 

BritishColumbiaLegislatureBuildingRoof.jpg

The prize, up for grabs: ‘All parties engaged in electoral politics do so in order to win power and implement their policies. That includes seeking a mandate from voters in a general election.’ Photo: Wikimedia.

“Impulsive actions led to trouble, and trouble could have unpleasant consequences.” — Stieg Larsson, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

 

As the provincial election battles rages, some progressive voters want to punish the BC New Democrats and Premier John Horgan for calling an election — one they can actually win to form a four-year majority social democratic government. 

Other progressives are thinking about denying the BC NDP their support because of Site C. 

Perhaps some feel that the New Democrats are going to win anyway, so they can cast a protest vote or just not vote at all to express their displeasure. 

I am here to argue that would be a mistake. Have they forgotten what it was like for progressives to be out of power in the province for 16 long, depressing years?

Despite polling showing the BC NDP with a double-digit lead, we’ve seen big advantages turn into defeats before, here in 2013 most notably. Many races this election are in ridings where the margin of victory last time was a few hundred votes or even less. Province wide polling doesn’t show riding-by-riding races, and its seats that count most. (The BC Liberals won more votes but fewer seats in the 1996 election that delivered an NDP government.) 

It’s my strong belief that in this critical election, some progressive voters are acting impulsively in a misguided effort to penalize the BC NDP government while ignoring the enormous trouble they risk by helping elect a BC Liberal government under leader Andrew Wilkinson.

Of course, as a lifelong New Democrat who runs a consulting firm assisting unions, businesses and other organizations with strategy, communications and government relations, some readers will doubtless disregard any and everything I say here as either self-interested, partisan or unprincipled — so be it.

But I’m proud of my progressive credentials — as a former communications director to an NDP premier and a BC Federation of Labour president, a long-time political columnist and commentator here at The Tyee and elsewhere, and as a campaign strategist. 

I well recall the BC Liberal record of slashing and burning public services after then premier Gordon Campbell’s disastrous 25 per cent income tax cut in 2001 blew a gaping hole in the budget. 

That’s especially important in this election where Wilkinson, a party president and then deputy minister under Campbell and a cabinet minister under ex-premier Christy Clark, is promising a Provincial Sales Tax cut of almost $11 billion over two years alone that makes the previous BC Liberals look like cheap pikers.

How can anyone forget that under the BC Liberals there were: 

 

  • no disability benefits increases for an entire decade;
  • a frozen minimum wage for the province’s poorest workers;
  • mass layoffs in the public service;
  • a war against teachers;
  • the ripping up of contracts for hospital workers and nurses and the privatization of health-care jobs;
  • the degradation of employment standards for non-union workers;
  • wholesale employer-dictated changes to the Labour Code for union workers;
  • an unfair Harmonized Sales Tax was imposed to transfer $2 billion in taxes from big businesses to consumers.

 

Or that his successor Premier Christy Clark presided over: 

 

  • wiping out the dream of home ownership for hundreds of thousands of British Columbians as her financial backers in the real estate development sector made windfall profits through 30 per cent plus annual increases in prices due to foreign and other speculation;
  • money laundering that reached record levels;
  • massive corporate funding of the BC Liberals that had the New York Times describe our province as the “wild west” of political financing.

 

The list of political malfeasance could and indeed did fill volumes

And now some voters are willing to risk all that and more just to whack the BC NDP? That’s simply self-destructive behaviour! 

Let’s deal with some objections by progressive voters to the BC NDP, starting with Horgan’s early election call. 

About the CASA agreement

The complaints are generally either that it should not have been called during the COVID-19 pandemic; that it should have proceeded at the fixed election date in October 2021; and/or that it violated the Confidence and Supply Agreement with the BC Greens.

Already more than 640,000 British Columbians have voted by mail this election, an option proven secure as well as safely convenient. 

But even voting in person — as New Brunswick just showed in its election — can be done completely safely by following standard COVID-19 protocols. Advance poll or election day balloting will likely be safer than a regular trip to the supermarket. 

Second, it unfortunately appears that COVID-19 will still be among us a year from now, when the election was scheduled to happen. 

Third, with a minority government, an election has always been possible since the BC NDP were sworn in — any defeat in a confidence vote in the legislature would have sent British Columbians to the polls in short order.

Fourth, fixed election dates in B.C. and Canada are a relatively new phenomenon imported from the U.S. Our parliamentary system has always given ultimate authority in calling elections to our legislators, with the approval of the lieutenant-governor — which was given for this election.

Fifth, and perhaps most cited by critics, is that the election call breaks the CASA agreement. CASA does state that it will continue for four years or “until the next scheduled election” — but it also says that to “promote stability, the government must be able to negotiate with the three BC Green MLAs as a single, recognized caucus.”

That part went out the door with the rancorous departure of former leader Andrew Weaver, who quit the party altogether to sit as an independent MLA. Weaver now endorses Horgan for another term as premier. So much for CASA. 

It’s understandable that the BC Greens — who were surprised by the election call despite several months of public and media speculation — are very unhappy. They were unable to field a complete slate of candidates. 

But let’s not pretend that the BC NDP and BC Greens were ever going to run a unity slate in a 2021 election or not fight tooth and nail for seats. In the legislature, the Greens did not support the BC NDP renter credit promise, labour code changes to allow more workers to join unions or $10 a day childcare plans. Several times they threatened to defeat the government.

Still, it’s clear that almost all of the CASA agreement’s goals the BC NDP and BC Greens agreed upon have already been met, including: 

 

  • election financing reform;
  • stricter lobbying regulations;
  • holding an electoral systems referendum;
  • passing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples;
  • providing funding for improved transit in Metro Vancouver;
  • increasing the minimum wage substantially;
  • attempting to stop the Kinder Morgan pipeline;
  • supplying the BC Green MLAs with more funding and resources.

 

Those still objecting also don’t realize that all parties engaged in electoral politics do so in order to win power and implement their policies — their ideological goals. To achieve that success it’s necessary to literally be political — and that includes seeking a mandate from voters in a general election.

Probably not since the Second World War has seeking a mandate from voters been more important than now. It’s absolutely necessary to chart the course through the remainder of the COVID-19 crisis — from health care to economic recovery to public services — to ensure B.C. comes out of this terrible disease as well as possible.

And given that most mandates run for four years and this government has reached the three-and-a-half year mark, it’s more than reasonable to call an election.

But what about the damn dam?

Next, the Site C dam project.

The BC NDP government faced, as I’ve written, a Sophie’s Choicesituation — the Christy Clark BC Liberal government had rushed into spending more than $2 billion in site preparation and construction on Site C by the time Horgan took office. The BC NDP had always said the project should not have been started and called for the project to be independently reviewed before proceeding — but the BC Liberals refused. 

So as per the CASA agreement, the government referred the project to the independent BC Utilities Commission for an expedited review. And then it had to decide.

With $2 billion already spent and at least $2 billion estimated to return Site C to its previous condition — spending $4 billion for literally nothing — the government made the difficult call to proceed and reap the benefits of 1,100 megawatts of clean, green, renewable hydroelectric power for the future. And yes, hydroelectric power is still green despite what some critics claim. Even the Leap Manifesto’s appendix paper on eliminating all fossil fuels by 2030 showed the world would need 900 hydroelectric dams producing 1,300 megawatts of power — more than Site C — in a renewable energy mix. 

B.C.’s building trades unions — who were all but shut out of the project by the BC Liberals — urged the NDP government to continue with Site C and welcomed its decision. (And I worked with them as advisor and lobbyist.) Many energy experts saw merits to Site C.

Some will argue that Site C is so fraught with geotechnical problems it will never be completed. But that position ignores BC Hydro’s long and successful history of dam building, even in challenging circumstances.

And even at a higher than anticipated cost, Site C will produce electricityto meet growing provincial demand for over 100 years. 

Those who have fought Site C for years will never be convinced — and I respect their opinion.

image atom

We Asked Smart People If the NDP Should Call an Election

READ MORE 

At the moment, though, the question is: What would critics do? Defeat the BC NDP so the BC Liberals could finish Site C? Vote BC Green despite that party’s MLAs accepting Site C continuing as part of their deal with the BC NDP — and with zero chance of leader Sonia Furstenau becoming premier? 

Could any party survive voter anger at wasting upwards of $6 billion to turn the site back to its previous state? Not a chance.

Beyond Site C, there are other important battles underway where the outcome is unknown — the fight for affordable housing for all, especially the homeless; dealing with the horrific opioid overdose crisis and the terrible waste of human lives resulting from drug addiction; the enormous challenge of transitioning away from fossil fuels to renewables without devastating B.C.’s economy or its significant natural resource sector; helping our hospitality, restaurant and tourism sectors recover from COVID-19; reconciliation with Indigenous peoples; continued improvement of health care and education; and much more.

That those who would risk the progress made so far — and the possibility of many other progressive changes for B.C. over the next four years — simply because an election was called early or they disagree on one issue — shows disregard for hundreds of thousands of people who suffered under the BC Liberals.  [Tyee]

Read more: EnergyBC Election 2020

 

 

https://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2020/10/19/A-Word-To-Progressives-Who-Want-ND...

kropotkin1951

The Liberal's campaign slogan is "Restore Confidence." It falls very flat without a three month campaign by BC's business elite saying that there is no confidence. Without the negative smear stage before the election advertising restrictions kick in, the snap election call has left the Liberal party on its own with only half a campaign.

NorthReport

How easy we forget that the BC NDP only had a minority government, and the Greens blocked progressive labour legislation.

Where They Stand: The Parties on Making Life Better for Workers

We asked experts about the NDP record on work life reform, what’s needed, and how the competing platforms compare.

https://thetyee.ca/News/2020/10/19/Where-They-Stand-Life-Better-For-Work...

NorthReport
Left Turn Left Turn's picture

Bill Tieleman wrote:

But what about the damn dam?

Next, the Site C dam project.

The BC NDP government faced, as I’ve written, a Sophie’s Choicesituation — the Christy Clark BC Liberal government had rushed into spending more than $2 billion in site preparation and construction on Site C by the time Horgan took office. The BC NDP had always said the project should not have been started and called for the project to be independently reviewed before proceeding — but the BC Liberals refused. 

So as per the CASA agreement, the government referred the project to the independent BC Utilities Commission for an expedited review. And then it had to decide.

With $2 billion already spent and at least $2 billion estimated to return Site C to its previous condition — spending $4 billion for literally nothing — the government made the difficult call to proceed and reap the benefits of 1,100 megawatts of clean, green, renewable hydroelectric power for the future. And yes, hydroelectric power is still green despite what some critics claim. Even the Leap Manifesto’s appendix paper on eliminating all fossil fuels by 2030 showed the world would need 900 hydroelectric dams producing 1,300 megawatts of power — more than Site C — in a renewable energy mix. 

B.C.’s building trades unions — who were all but shut out of the project by the BC Liberals — urged the NDP government to continue with Site C and welcomed its decision. (And I worked with them as advisor and lobbyist.) Many energy experts saw merits to Site C.

Some will argue that Site C is so fraught with geotechnical problems it will never be completed. But that position ignores BC Hydro’s long and successful history of dam building, even in challenging circumstances.

And even at a higher than anticipated cost, Site C will produce electricityto meet growing provincial demand for over 100 years. 

Those who have fought Site C for years will never be convinced — and I respect their opinion.

The opposition of the West Moberly first nation, whose traditional territory the Site C dam will flood, should have been the end of the discussion about Site C. In deciding to continue with Site C, John Horgan and the BC NDP have chosen to side with the racist settler-colonial regime against indigenous land rights -- as they have also done on fracking and LNG.

John Horgan and the BC NDP claim to support UNDRIP -- they passed into into law in the fall of 2019 -- but are unwilling to apply it when it actually counts.

NorthReport

The NDP inherited the damn mess from the Liberals. The Greens supported the NDP for 3 years while the dam proceeded. The dam will proceed but compensation should be considered. Maybe give the Indigenous Peoples all the jobs operating the dam once its built.

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

B.C. youth are organizing for climate candidates this election — even if many can’t vote

Quote:
Harrison Johnston remembers standing in a little coffee shop last September, watching in awe as a massive crowd marched from Vancouver City Hall to the Central Library downtown.

Then a lead organizer with Sustainabiliteens, a youth-led climate movement in Metro Vancouver that coordinated the Sept. 27, 2019, climate strike, he said he had only expected up to 20,000 people. Instead, the protest became the largest in the city’s history, with over 100,000 people filling the streets.

“We didn’t need to be doing anything,” he said. “There was just so much power in this mass of people there.”

This fall, climate organizing is looking different for the Sustainabiliteens, who first came together in 2018 as part of the school-strike movement inspired by Greta Thunberg.

The COVID-19 pandemic has severely limited the size of climate rallies — like those ahead of the federal Speech from the Throne — that Sustainabiliteens have been able to hold with other youth-led climate groups. But with NDP leader John Horgan calling a snap election in B.C., organizers see a chance to pursue a more direct approach: get climate activists elected.

Climate justice champions

For many young organizers, trying to engage politicians about the need for bold climate action can be a discouraging exercise.

Johnston, who is running as a Green candidate in North Vancouver-Seymour, recalled feeling frustrated in the months following the climate strike. Despite the event’s historic turnout, he said he didn’t see it having a major impact on government actions, pointing to the province’s large fossil fuel subsidies and the police incursion on Wetʼsuwetʼen territory in support of the Coastal GasLink pipeline.

“I really came to the decision over the year since then that I have no faith in the people who are currently in our government to be fighting for my future, the future of my generation and my children’s generation,” he said.

“And if I want something to change in the government, I should probably go try to do it.”

Sustainabiliteens organizers Rebecca Hamilton and Naia Lee agree, saying that the movement has now shifted its effort to getting “champions for climate justice” into office.

“We’ve really realized that we’re done with trying to convince politicians about the livelihood of our generation,” said Hamilton.

With many of their close to 200 organizers still under the voting age, Sustainabiliteens are instead signing up their members to volunteer for candidates who align with their goals, like Johnston. They are also using their platform to endorse and draw attention to candidates who are committed to climate justice actions like ending fossil fuel subsidies and actively pursuing social justice.

As of Oct. 18, Sustainabiliteens have publicly endorsed five candidates from the NDP and Green parties. But there are still a few endorsements pending, according to Hamilton.

“Then hopefully once they’ve been elected partially through the power of our volunteers and organizers, we’re going to spend the next four years holding them accountable as they work in the legislature,” Lee said.

‘Together, collectively, we have agency’

Campaigning during a pandemic has brought limitations and opportunities. According to Johnston, COVID-19 is disrupting many traditional staples of campaigning. He and his team haven’t been doing any door-knocking, which is challenging for a newcomer who is trying to get his name and message out in the riding.

But he also pointed out that COVID-19 is showcasing a way to mobilize people around the climate crisis, an issue that requires similarly urgent responses.

“It's definitely given us opportunities to choose a different direction,” Johnston said. “Now we really have an opportunity, as our economy is going to need massive stimulus. We really have an opportunity to be shifting the way our economy has been functioning to a greener, more just economy.”

Tesicca Truong, a Sustainabiliteens-endorsed NDP candidate for Vancouver-Langara, added that there are fewer excuses now for not pushing bold policies for the recovery process. She said responses to the numerous crises B.C. faces — including the climate crisis and COVID-19 — “need to centre those who have been disproportionately impacted and those who have been historically and continue to be marginalized,” such as Indigenous communities.

“A lot of us like just to dream again politically, to see that what we’ve been told is not possible is actually possible and possible within weeks’ time at the federal level and international level,” Truong said.

“Together, collectively, we have agency.”

Going all in

With less than a week until Election Day, it remains to be seen how successful Sustainabilities-endorsed candidates will be, particularly for Truong and Johnston, who are both running against B.C. Liberal incumbents who recently served as the Official Opposition.

And while the movement’s organizers remain hopeful, they are also already looking beyond the election.

According to Hamilton, Sustainabiliteens will be shifting away from climate strikes partly because of COVID-19 restrictions and partly to broaden their engagement with adult supporters and solidarity work with Indigenous sovereignty movements.

“Something we talk about a lot is that we need to bring climate into everything,” Lee added. “Often, I think the climate movement is a little bit of a silo.”

The movement is also entering schools and setting up clubs across Metro Vancouver to teach youth about climate justice and direct action skills, while facilitating a shift away from focusing only on individual actions such as recycling. Hamilton said they are currently developing a multi-week training program to give young people across the country the skills to organize their local communities.

Ultimately, organizers like Lee and Hamilton, who have deferred university to commit to climate organizing, are giving the movement their all — during and after the election.

“We all spent a lot of the last two years of high school mostly doing climate organizing and we all want to be able to go full in because it just feels so urgent, said Hamilton.

“Going to school is about preparing for a future, but we feel the biggest way to prepare for our future is to help stop climate change.”

NorthReport
NorthReport
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The NDP inherited the damn mess from the Liberals

As I said, the opposition of the West Moberly nation to having their traditional territoy flooded should have been the end of the discussion about Site C. The $4 billion should not have been a consideration.

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