Battle of Montgomery's Tavern

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Webgear
Battle of Montgomery's Tavern

Battle of Montgomery's Tavern

"The Battle of Montgomery's Tavern was an incident that sparked the Upper Canada Rebellion on December 7, 1837. The abortive revolutionary insurrection inspired by William Lyon Mackenzie was crushed by British authorities and Canadian volunteer units near a tavern on Yonge Street, Toronto."

 

Webgear

In my view this is one of the defining moments in Canadian history.

For good or bad, this incident created the nation we now belong to.

DaveW

 

 

Montgomery's Tavern was eventually transformed into the site of a Canada Post office, between Montgomery and Helendale Aves., a block from my high school, North Toronto CI;

when I went to grade 9, the underground paper there was titled MTR: Montgomery Tavern Revival

 

 

oldgoat

I believe Montgomery's Tavern was actually across the street at what later became 52 division and is now some stores.  Spent the night there once. The tavern itself was moved out past High park and is now a historic site. I'm an old Lawrence Park CI man, myself. 

DaveW

DaveW wrote:

 

anyway, meant to add for those outside TO/North Toronto that the whole complex is near Yonge and Eglinton, and yes, the 52 division is still across the street from the MT -- as was the Broadway Music Shoppe, site of my first purchase of a ($17, I think), guitar ...

Webgear

My great grandfather's ancestors (mother's side of the family) were friends with William Lyon Mackenzie in the 1830s. Mr Mackenzie delivered a small wooden box to the family after another family member meet his end at the end of hangman's rope in 1838.

Both were in jail together for a while.

Tommy_Paine

 

Many of the Rebels--and just sympathisers-- of both the Upper and Lower Canada revolt were transported to Australia during the Tory reign of terror in the years after 1837.  

Jack Cahill's "Forgotten Patriots:  Canadian Rebels on Australia's Convict Shores" details that history.

 

A side note:

I noticed on my daughter's grade 3 report card, a reference to the study of Upper Canada under the heading of "social studies."   Her teacher had never heard of "The Family Compact", when I asked her about it.

 

Funny, the stuff they don't want us to know.

Webgear

 

Tommy

Can you provide any numbers of those transported to Australia?

I believe if my memory is correct several dozens were shipped to Australia after the Battle of the Windmill in 1838.

History on most matters is poorly or incorrectly taught. I am currently re-reading several books about regards to English life in 1300s which is large taught incorrectly in Canadian schools.

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

I presume everyone contributing to this thread is aware of the work of Rick Salutin, playwright.

Quote:
The collective approach used in several of his plays reflects Salutin's populist sentiments. The adventures of an immigrant and i.w.a. were developed with the active collaboration of the actors and director, as was his first published play, 1837: the farmers' revolt (1976)-created in collaboration with the dynamic group of actors at Theatre Passe Muraille, Toronto, and its innovative director Paul Thompson in 1972 and 1973-about the abortive 1837-8 uprising led by William Lyon Mackenzie. His sympathies clearly with the rebels, Salutin answered many questions raised by the drama in a lengthy introduction to another edition of the play entitled 1837: William Lyon Mackenzie and the Canadian revolution: a history/a play (1975). The Passe Muraille production has toured many parts of Canada as well as Scotland, and was produced on cbc television in 1975. For the 150th anniversary of the 1837 rebellion, Salutin wrote a ten-part radio play for cbc ‘Morningside' entitled The reluctant patriot (unpublished) about Samuel Chandler, a wagonmaker who spirited the fugitive Mackenzie across the border into the United States after the rebellion was suppressed.

Biography of Rick Salutin

 

 

-=+=-

I recall seeing a plaque in Windsor, Ontario commemorating several rebels (seven I think) that were transported from the area of what used to be Sandwich after the rebellion.  I believe it also said one or two of the leaders were hanged, and rest had death sentences commuted to transportation.

Many patriotes were also sent from Lower Canada to Australia, where of course they were cut off from their culture and their language.  I believe the folk song Un Canadien Errant is about this experience.

That is strange that a teacher would not know about the Family Compact.  When I went to school in Ontario in the late 70s/early 80s, that stuff was drummed into our heads in history class after history class (and thank goodness it was).  Is it really not being taught anymore?

And as a sidenote, in British Columbia (where I now live), the Hudson Bay Company - Tory ruling establishment that was trying to throttle democracy in the early days of the colony was referred to as the "Family Company Compact" by the reformers, who were invoking the Upper Canadian experience.

 

 

Caissa

I think the problem is that most elementary teachers are generalist I may have never taken an university level history course and have forgotten all they learned in high school. As well the primary focus of elementary school is literacy and mathematics. Social Studies gets very little instructional time.

Caissa

Most elementary teachers are generalist who may have never taken post-secondary courses in history and forgotten much of their high school education. The focus of elementary school is literacy and math. Social studies gets very little instructional time.

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Elementary school teachers get a number of courses in teaching methodology.  These methodology courses include Mathematics, Language Arts AND Social Studies. The courses are ALL 3 credits at VIU (for example). Any prospective teacher would have had to take courses prior to being accepted into an Education program ... and these course could well have included some basic Canadian History, etc.

If you want to teach Social Studies in Secondary Schools, then the courses required are different.

Webgear

In my view history is a dead subject, I guess for any number of reasons.

My first love has always been history.

 

Caissa

Hey, N. Beltov. I did my B.Ed in NB (secondary). My colleagues in elementary did not get a social studies methods course. That aside the methods course are exactly that: methods of teaching. They rarely cover content. In NB, one could get ito a B.Ed. programme without having taken any Canadian history course. Things may vary in your neck of the woods.

Tommy_Paine

Tommy


Can you provide any numbers of those transported to Australia?

 

In the preface, Cahill starts off with the HMS Buffalo leaving Quebec City for Australia, with 141 prisoners on board.  Four were convicts unrelated to the Rebellions.   The others were Canadian, American and French Canadian rebels, whose death sentences were commuted to transportation.  Whether that was better than hanging is perhaps best left to the individual to decide.  Cahill mentions smaller numbers being shipped off in smaller ships.   Later, he mentions a figure of 154.  

It could be that the exact number is not known-- although I suspect that it is, as the British tended to be obsessive record keepers, at least with names and numbers.   My guess is that the exact number is burried in this book, but my quick look see didn't uncover it.

I think if you said "about 200"  you probably wouldn't be faulted.

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Caissa: Yes, things do vary in my neck of the woods.

You may be interested in the views of a very left wing educator in the USA by the name of Rich Gibson.

In particular, he's got a link to an interesting book: If this is Social Studies, Why Isn't It Boring? Check it out.

Caissa

Thanks, NB. Interesting link.