Canada's First Indigenous Governor General and the Failures of the Trudeau Government on Indigenous Issues

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jerrym
Canada's First Indigenous Governor General and the Failures of the Trudeau Government on Indigenous Issues

Inuk leader Mary Simon is Canada's first indigenous Governor General. Congratulations to her. However, while it is good to see this, it is also typical of the Trudeau government in its symbolic approach to governing without providing the resources needed to deal with the related issues. This is similar to Trudeau's declaring a climate change emergency and within a day purchasing the Trans Mountain pipeline to build a pipeline to triple the amount of fossil fuel heading to BC's coast. Of course, this good news also does nothing to resolve the snail's pace of resolving indigenous land claims under the Trudeau and previous federal governments.

There are so many indigenous issues where the Trudeau government has engaged in symbolic gestures without providing the resources to deal with these pressing issues.

Inuk leader Mary Simon will serve as the Queen's new representative in Canada, marking the first time an Indigenous person has held the role.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that the Queen has accepted his recommendation of Simon, a past president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the national Inuit organization, to be the 30th governor general during a news conference at the Canadian Museum of History Tuesday morning. ...

Simon, an Inuk from Kuujjuaq, a small hamlet on the coast of Ungava Bay in northeastern Quebec, worked as an announcer and producer with CBC North before starting a decades-long career advocating for Indigenous rights. She helped negotiate the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement in 1975, a landmark deal between the Cree and Inuit in Quebec's north, the provincial government and Hydro-Québec. Widely seen as the country's "first modern treaty," the province acknowledged Cree and Inuit rights in the James Bay region for the first time — such as exclusive hunting, fishing and trapping rights and self-governance in some areas — and offered financial compensation in exchange for the construction of massive new hydroelectric dams to fuel the growing province's demand for new energy sources.

Simon was subsequently elected president of Makivik Corp. in 1982, the organization created to administer the funds that the Inuit received from the development on their lands. The organization now manages tens of millions of dollars worth of investments, including an ownership stake in Canadian North, a major air carrier in the Arctic. In 1986, Simon was tapped to lead the Inuit Circumpolar Conference (ICC), a group created in 1977 to represent the Inuit in all the Arctic countries. At the ICC, she championed two priorities for Indigenous Peoples of the north: protecting their way of life from environmental damage and pushing for responsible economic development on their traditional territory. 

In 2002, former prime minister Jean Chrétien named her Canada's first Arctic ambassador, a position where Simon worked closely with the eight other circumpolar countries to bolster co-operation in the region.

Simon, who is bilingual in English and Inuktitut, said she was learning French. "I was denied the chance to learn French during my stay in the federal government day schools," she told reporters.

When asked about her unique role as the first Indigenous person representing the Crown, Simon said she doesn't see conflict. "Because as the Queen's representative in Canada, I am very concerned about the circumstances that lead to some of the events that we are seeing today. I do understand as an Indigenous person that there is pain and suffering across our nation," she said.

"When I was asked whether I would take on this important role,I was very excited and I felt that this was a position that would help Canadians together with Indigenous Peoples."

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/trudeau-gg-1.6091376

jerrym

As always the Trudeau government is very good at messaging, but very poor at delivering the goods. While its is symbolically important to have an indigenous Governor General (I would have preferred a Canadian head of state with no links to another imperialist power), it does little to change the everyday lives of indigenous people. 

The Trudeau government pushed to have the Catholic Church apologize (which is the pot calling the kettle black since the federal government created the system that the Catholic and other churches implemented), there is something that he has more direct control of - the federal government response to indigenous problems that continue to result in the removal of indigenous children from their communities and families.

The Trudeau Liberal government knows how to talk about indigneous issues for electoral purposes but has failed to act on key indigenous demands that have nothing to do with the Catholic Church, especially when money is involved: it continues to litigate against $40,000 per indigenous child (total limit allowed under its statute) in damages for the wilful and reckless discriminatory conduct and for pain and suffering from the discriminatory conduct, three years after the 2016 decision of a human rights tribunal and in 2019 by the Supreme Court of Canada, even after saying it would settle during the 2019 election in order to avoid it becoming a major election issue. (https://www.thelawyersdaily.ca/articles/24451/canada-s-shell-game-on-c-9...) It also refuses to implement the Supreme Court ruling that the federal government has constitutional responsibility for Métis and Non-Status Indians because of the costs involved. As the first of the two following articles explains, a principle reason that indigenous children continue to be apprehended and removed from their families and communities is the extreme underfunding of child welfare for indigenous children compared to non-indigenous children. This is a direct result of the Trudeau government's failure to implement the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal and the Supreme Court rulings on this issue over the last five years. After six years of governing it still has failed to remove many of the boil water advisories of reserves, something that would never be allowed to happen on non-indigenous communities over such an extremely long extended period. 

 

jerrym

While Trudeau Liberals name the first indigenous Governor General and make statements of condolence and help to indigenous Canadians, the Liberal government lawyers continue fighting any settlements in the courts. The Liberal government has spent $3.2 million on lawyers in order to oppose  St. Anne's residential school in northern Ontario survivors seeking redress for their suffering, some of whom were given shocks in an electric chair . (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Anne%27s_Indian_Residential_School)

In another lawsuit involving First Nations children who attended Kamloops Residential School seek reparations from the federal government for the impact residential schools had on Indigenous nations — fracturing communities, suppressing cultures and erasing languages.  105 First Nations have signed onto the lawsuit. The Trudeau Liberals are denying any legal responsibility for damage to First Nations cultures from removing indigenous children from their families and culture. Once again Trudeau's pious words are contradicted by his and the Liberals actions. (https://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/reparations-residential-school-1.6050501)

jerrym

In still another case yet to go before the courts, a growing number of indigenous people are suing the federal government over the process of enfranchisement that their ancestors were forced to go through to obtain "the right to vote, own property and keep their children out of residential schools by renouncing their Indian status and treaty rights". Considering the discrimination involved and what we now know about the avalanche of deaths at residential schools, as well as its goal of removing the Indian from indigenous people, this should be granted without having to go to court to win back what rightfully belongs to these people. Claiming the act of enfranchisement was voluntary when it was done under extreme coercion would not be recognized in any international tribunal. The court case also involves those women who lost their status because they married a non-status man, while indigneous men could marry non-status women and keep their status. Although this law has been changed since the 1980s, those indigenous women and their descendents who lost their status before the change have not had their status reinstated. (https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/charter-challenge-bc-supreme-court-stat...)

I suspect that if Trudeau can get away with providing a symbolic gesture to those indigenous people who lost their indigenous rights through "enfranchisement" or through an indigenous status female marrying a non-status male before the laws were changed in the 1980s without providing any compensation to these individuals he would do, especially on the eve of an election where this symbolic gesture would look good. However, if these indigenous people refuse compensation, he will fight for years and years against them in court, just as he has done in the previous lawsuits described in the above posts. 

While appointing an indigenous titular head of state is important in recognizing the importance of indigenous people in the history and current affairs of this country, there is so much more that the Trudeau government is blocking in terms of rectifying the wrongs of the past and the conditions now faced by indigenous people. 

Edzell Edzell's picture

jerrym wrote:

The Trudeau government pushed to have the Catholic Church apologize (which is the pot calling the kettle black since the federal government created the system that the Catholic and other churchez implemented.

Just want to point out; that's a little unfair to the  current government. They did not create or enable creation of the detestable residential schools.

I feel that shaming living persons for the sins of their ancestors has become a bit too fashionable. As has been said elsewhere, we all inherited the situation we were born into. We can & should be held accountable about how we deal with it but not for how it came to exist.

Pondering

 There is no need for personal guilt however there is reason for the government to be held responsible no matter who is running it in the present for that which was done in the past. 

It's not like every four years we start fresh with no existing laws or government or country. We build  on the past therefore we are responsible for it as a country. 

Edzell Edzell's picture

So we have a new GG to represent our English head of state, with the theoretical power to legitimise our government or dismiss it.

If the British were to dispense with the monarchy, Canada would be left with NO head of state. What then for us, constitutionally? - It would be like holding a bagful of angry cats, all over again!

What Fun to speculate .... :)

jerrym

Edzell wrote:

jerrym wrote:

The Trudeau government pushed to have the Catholic Church apologize (which is the pot calling the kettle black since the federal government created the system that the Catholic and other churchez implemented.

Just want to point out; that's a little unfair to the  current government. They did not create or enable creation of the detestable residential schools.

I feel that shaming living persons for the sins of their ancestors has become a bit too fashionable. As has been said elsewhere, we all inherited the situation we were born into. We can & should be held accountable about how we deal with it but not for how it came to exist.

By the same logic you could argue that the current leadership of the Catholic Church had nothing to do with this since they weren't directly involved in what happened in Canada's residential school since few of the cardinals or pope come from Canada.

However, both the current federal government and the Catholic Church, are involved in blocking restitution for these crimes. As noted above the Trudeau Liberal government continues to litigate against $40,000 per indigenous child (total limit allowed under its statute) in damages for the wilful and reckless discriminatory conduct and for pain and suffering from the discriminatory conduct, three years after the 2016 decision of a human rights tribunal and in 2019 by the Supreme Court of Canada, even after saying it would settle during the 2019 election in order to avoid it becoming a major election issue. (https://www.thelawyersdaily.ca/articles/24451/canada-s-shell-game-on-c-9...

Both the current Catholic Church heirarchy and the Trudeau Liberal government share a responsibility for failing to deal with indigenous issues in anything ressembling a fair manner. However, the Trudeau government's failures go beyond the residential schools, to its failure to rescind the loss of status for women and for those indigenous people who felt forced to accept 'enfranchisement' by giving up their indigenous rights to obtain the rights that all other citizens get automatically through citizenship  (https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/charter-challenge-bc-supreme-court-stat...);  to end boil water advisories by providing sufficient funding to accomplish this promise; and in failing to provide funding at the same level for housing, healthcare and schooling as those who don't live on reserves.

In denying any legal responsibility for damage to First Nations cultures from removing indigenous children from their families and culture in the lawsuit brought by Tk'emlups te' Secwepemc and shíshálh Nation in B.C. who were forced to attend Kamloops Indian Residential School and Sechelt Indian Residential School and joined by 105 other First Nations, the Trudeau Liberals are acting in a manner not much different from the Catholic Church (https://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/reparations-residential-school-1.6050501).

The Trudeau Liberal government therefore should be ashamed of its actions with regards to First Nations in general and with regards to residential schools in particular. 

Ken Burch

Edzell wrote:

jerrym wrote:

The Trudeau government pushed to have the Catholic Church apologize (which is the pot calling the kettle black since the federal government created the system that the Catholic and other churchez implemented.

Just want to point out; that's a little unfair to the  current government. They did not create or enable creation of the detestable residential schools.

I feel that shaming living persons for the sins of their ancestors has become a bit too fashionable. As has been said elsewhere, we all inherited the situation we were born into. We can & should be held accountable about how we deal with it but not for how it came to exist.

By "the federal government", the poster you're responding to clearly meant the Canadian government as a long-term institution.  It's extremely unlikely that mosts people reading that would take that phrase to mean that Justin & Co. started the residential schools.

Edzell Edzell's picture

Ken Burch wrote:

By "the federal government", the poster you're responding to clearly meant the Canadian government as a long-term institution. 

The post and statement I'm resferring to says, precisely:

"The Trudeau government pushed to have the Catholic Church apologize (for residential schools) (which is the pot calling the kettle black ....)"

However one interprets the post, I hold that shaming the living for the deeds of the dead is illogical. "We" have enough sins of our own  to address.

jerrym

Edzell wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:

By "the federal government", the poster you're responding to clearly meant the Canadian government as a long-term institution. 

The post and statement I'm resferring to says, precisely:

"The Trudeau government pushed to have the Catholic Church apologize (for residential schools) (which is the pot calling the kettle black ....)"

 

However one interprets the post, I hold that shaming the living for the deeds of the dead is illogical. "We" have enough sins of our own  to address.

The entire post points out that the Liberals fail to take responsibility for their own actions as a successor federal government for what happened in the residential schools while calling on the current Catholic Church to do so. I noted that "both the current federal government and the Catholic Church, are involved in blocking restitution for these crimes." by  spending $9.1 million against settling $40,000 per indigenous child (total limit allowed under its statute) in damages claim for the wilful and reckless discriminatory conduct and for pain and suffering from the discriminatory conduct, three years after the 2016 decision of a human rights tribunal and in 2019 by the Supreme Court of Canada (https://www.thelawyersdaily.ca/articles/24451/canada-s-shell-game-on-c-9...); by spending $3.2 million on lawyers in order to oppose  St. Anne's residential school in northern Ontario survivors seeking redress for their suffering, some of whom were given shocks in an electric chair (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Anne%27s_Indian_Residential_School); by failing to rescind the loss of status for women and for those indigenous people who felt forced to accept 'enfranchisement' by giving up their indigenous rights to obtain the rights that all other citizens get automatically through citizenship  (https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/charter-challenge-bc-supreme-court-stat...);  by denying any legal responsibility for damage to First Nations cultures from removing indigenous children from their families and culture in the lawsuit brought by Tk'emlups te' Secwepemc and shíshálh Nation in B.C. who were forced to attend Kamloops Indian Residential School and Sechelt Indian Residential School and joined by 105 other First Nations (https://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/reparations-residential-school-1.6050501); and by failing to put in place education, healthcare, and other services on reserve remotely comparable to what non-reserve Canadians receive. 

That is plenty wrong with the Trudeau government's approach to dealing with the residential school issue as well as the other issues mentioned above. By failing to deal with these issues, they are compounding the errors of the past and therefore are at fault. I will leave my argument at that before we get into an endless back and forth that is often seen here.

 

kropotkin1951

In human rights law there is the concept of continuing breaches. If you don't stop the human rights abuses then you are stuck with the whole record going back  years rather than something that has just happened. The federal government according to the Canadian Human Rights Commission is discriminating against indigenous communities. That makes them responsible for all the previous discrimination since they didn't try to fix the past abuses and instead they added their own abuses onto the pile. That logic applies for every federal government since we introduced the Indian Act. It is now Trudeau's turn to be held responsible for the ongoing human rights abuses committed against indigenous people continuously for over a hundred years.

Edzell Edzell's picture

jerrym wrote:

 I will leave my argument at that.

"Roger that."

NDPP

This appointment was an attack on Indigenous Sovereignty. This is Wreckonciliaition.

https://twitter.com/BarbaraXLow/status/1412809533857148928

"Appointment of Mary Simon as GG is a clever political move by Feds as she represents completion of Canada's colonization project, she helped negotiate 1975 James Bay Agreement extinguishing Aboriginal Title of Inuit and Cree and now helps with CANDRIP/Bill C51..."

Ken Burch

Mary Simon is about to become the most despised Indigenous person in Canada.   Essentially, she is an identity politics human sacrifice.

Edzell Edzell's picture

Ken Burch wrote:

Mary Simon is about to become the most despised Indigenous person in Canada.

By Ken Burch, at least. I'm glad I wasn't born into some distant arm of the Trudeau family, or even a friend of a friend of a 10th cousin of Justin. It can't be nice to be verbally vomited on by venomous people you've never heard of.

Ken Burch

Edzell wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:

Mary Simon is about to become the most despised Indigenous person in Canada.

By Ken Burch, at least. I'm glad I wasn't born into some distant arm of the Trudeau family, or even a friend of a friend of a 10th cousin of Justin. It can't be nice to be verbally vomited on by venomous people you've never heard of.

I have nothing against her personally- I was just pointing out that she will now become the focal point for the anger that should be directed not at her but solely at those on the government benches.  Why would you assume I was attacking her, rather than the cynicism involved in giving her this meaningless, powerless position?

earthquakefish

Ken Burch wrote:

Edzell wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:

Mary Simon is about to become the most despised Indigenous person in Canada.

By Ken Burch, at least. I'm glad I wasn't born into some distant arm of the Trudeau family, or even a friend of a friend of a 10th cousin of Justin. It can't be nice to be verbally vomited on by venomous people you've never heard of.

I have nothing against her personally- I was just pointing out that she will now become the focal point for the anger that should be directed not at her but solely at those on the government benches.  Why would you assume I was attacking her, rather than the cynicism involved in giving her this meaningless, powerless position?

 

Edzell, Trudeau has a history of playing identity politics without delivering anything.  Why would one assume he's doing anything different, on the heels of Canada Day, graves on residential school lands? He may actually be doing more, Trudeau, in dividing those who care, for his gain in this.

It's too convenient for him.  He's broken almost all social contracts he promised before, this is different?

Edzell Edzell's picture

Ken, It's good to know you have nothing personally against Mary Simon. I apologise if I misinterpreted your words. and I thank you for your courteous response to my intemperate reaction to them.

The position of Gov. General may seem meaningless & powerless (I don't think that has ever been tested in this country) but as part of our constitution we're stuck with it - until the next time someone is willing to open that can of worms.

EQfish, I'm well aware of the way politicians make promises they ought to know they can't (or have no intention to) keep. Some are more blatant than others; but my scorn for that behaviour is not limited to Justin Trudeau or anyone else. He just happens to be in charge right now.

However much I may dislike the present government I see no logic in trying to blame it for the prior existence of residential schools and their horrible consequences. I see too many people eagerly latching on to any excuse whatsoever just to vent what looks like a rather vicious hatred of Justin Trudeau, - whether or not an event was ever wihin his ability to control.

cco

I'm surprised Trudeau's moving so quickly on beginning to phase out bilingualism in government (though the "speaking French is racist against indigenous peoples" line has already been trotted out by pundits). I thought he'd wait until the Supreme Court had ruled on Bill 21 and take a look at the polls first.

Edzell wrote:

The position of Gov. General may seem meaningless & powerless (I don't think that has ever been tested in this country) but as part of our constitution we're stuck with it - until the next time someone is willing to open that can of worms.

On the contrary, it's far too powerful, as we learned (and promptly forgot) in 2008-09. But the idea that the constitution is stable in its present unamendable form continues to boggle my mind. Even if one stipulates that Quebec nationalism has been permanently defeated, the constitution's going to need to be amended when climate change puts PEI underwater. The UK's pre-1832 "rotten boroughs" are going to look reasonable compared to constitutionally guaranteed ridings that only scuba divers can vote in.

Edzell Edzell's picture

 

cco wrote:

I'm surprised Trudeau's moving so quickly on beginning to phase out bilingualism in government (though the "speaking French is racist against indigenous peoples" line has already been trotted out by pundits). I thought he'd wait until the Supreme Court had ruled on Bill 21 and take a look at the polls first.

I thnk it sad that Canada is not truly bilingual and most of irs citizens are comfortable in only one offocial  language, in many cases actively despising the other and (sometimes with justification) its adherents. The politicising of language is not only socially fracturing. It has its effect on the effieciency & cost of government too, with the need to make traslations of official documents before they can be published.

Haha; I was going to quote Switzerland, where people will converse happily in 2 or 3 tongues at once, as an example of how things could be so much better, until I read this ..

https://www.newlyswissed.com/official-languages-of-switzerland/

German, French, Italian, and Romansh are all official languages in Switzerland. This means that official records and federal documents need to be written in German, French and Italian

Oh, well, so much for my proto-comment.

lagatta4

Yes, I was about to point that out. Dammit, I missed a chance to be a pendant...

Edzell Edzell's picture

Referring to the powers of the Governon General:

cco wrote:

On the contrary, it's far too powerful, as we learned (and promptly forgot) in 2008-09......

I don't know whether a present-day Canadain GG would get away with putting the theoretical power into practice, particularly if it meant interfering with government intentions. It happened once in Australia but I suspect that even there it wouldn't be tolerated again.

In the Harper proroguing of parliament, I'd suggest it  was weakness rather than power that the Gov General displayed: that she caved in after a half hour (?) of bullying and/or bullshit by the PM. I guess we'll never know the details of what went on. In my own view she should have denied Harper the move, with the option to continue the parliament or have his governent dismissed. What would have happened next is anybody's guess :).

Quote:
But the idea that the constitution is stable in its present unamendable form continues to boggle my mind .... the constitution's going to need to be amended
I agree but how or when? It will be a mess.

Geoff

Three indicators that an election is imminent:

1. Justin appoints a new GG. (Great that she's Indigenous, but how about following through on the promise of clean drinking water for Indigenous communities?)

2. Justin appoints Hassan Yussuff, former president of the CLC, to the Senate. (Showing off his "progressive" credentials or simply rewarding a loyal Liberal foot soldier?)

3. Justin shaves off his beard. (The icing on the cake.)

Edzell Edzell's picture

Geoff wrote:

3. Justin shaves off his beard. (The icing on the cake.)

Haha! I swear he's had cosmetic treatment too. Looked older before the beard ?

NDPP

Oh Canada

https://twitter.com/Li_Yang_China/status/1411882189512347651

"Do you think your so-called reconciliation is worth showing off?"

 

"Gotta hand it to Justin Trudeau, there's no statesman as skilled at choreographing contrition about colonization while doing jack shit to remedy its ongoing injustices."

https://twitter.com/Martin_Lukacs/status/1413178797004836867

NDPP

Commissioner investigating after complaints pour in about next governor general

https://twitter.com/cblackst/status/1417454886057390081

"Such a disgrace - Indigenous peoples did not choose what language was beaten into us in residential schools. English and French are not endangered languages - Indigenous are."

The new GG, Mary Simon is fully bilingual in both English and Inuktitut, and has expressed a commitment to achieve fluency in French also.

NDPP

'This is thinly veiled anti-Indigenous Rascism'

https://twitter.com/Pam_Palmater/status/1417300154407915520

"It's not bad enough Inuit were victims of generations of genocide and attacks on their cultures and languages, but people are unhappy she was only colonized in English instead of also colonized in French? Racist much? What happened to protecting Indigenous languages? Reconciliation?"

cco

The day a governor-general is appointed who doesn't speak English, that argument will seem slightly less in bad faith. The idea that eliminating official bilingualism is a step towards reconciliation is preposterous.

kropotkin1951

Edzell wrote:

However much I may dislike the present government I see no logic in trying to blame it for the prior existence of residential schools and their horrible consequences. I see too many people eagerly latching on to any excuse whatsoever just to vent what looks like a rather vicious hatred of Justin Trudeau, - whether or not an event was ever wihin his ability to control.

Then how about condemning this ass grabbing feminist, anti-racist blackface actor for what he has done while PM? 

In particular, the motion refers to the Liberals’ decision to appeal a 2019 Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) ruling ordering Ottawa to pay $40,000 to First Nations children taken from their on-reserve homes and communities. The compensation order stems from another tribunal ruling in 2016, which found that the federal government was discriminating against First Nations children on reserves by failing to provide the same funding as welfare services elsewhere in the country.

The motion also takes aim at another tribunal ruling that widened who is covered under Jordan’s Principle, which prioritizes helping First Nations children in need, instead of arguing over which level of government should pay for the services.

Also included is a pledge for the federal government to meet with survivors from St. Anne’s Residential School, who are currently engaged in a protracted court battle with Ottawa over a compensation claim process.

https://www.thestar.com/politics/federal/2021/06/07/why-does-justin-trud...

Edzell Edzell's picture

Krop, I truly believe you are in serious need of psychiatric help. I urge you to seek it.

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

Edzell wrote:

Krop, I truly believe you are in serious need of psychiatric help. I urge you to seek it.

This is nonsense. Don't be such an ass.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I second what Michael stated above. I think you have stepped well over the line with your vitriol against Kropotkin.

Edzell Edzell's picture

laine lowe wrote:

I second what Michael stated above. I think you have stepped well over the line with your vitriol against Kropotkin.

That's a pretty wriggly line; seems to be placed wherever it's convenient at the time, for whoever wants to define it. When I came on here I thought it was a place for open respectful exchange of ideas. Wrong. With a few exceptions it turns out to be just an incestuous little in-group of scattershot hate peddlers.

Pigs in shit; enjoy youreselves.

 

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

Edzell wrote:

laine lowe wrote:

I second what Michael stated above. I think you have stepped well over the line with your vitriol against Kropotkin.

That's a pretty wriggly line; seems to be placed wherever it's convenient at the time, for whoever wants to define it. When I came on here I thought it was a place for open respectful exchange of ideas. Wrong. With a few exceptions it turns out to be just an incestuous little in-group of scattershot hate peddlers.

Pigs in shit; enjoy youreselves.

 

Project much, pal?

kropotkin1951

In the meantime I apologize for poking him a little. I find that a few pointed questions reveals quickly what a poster is like.

Here is something that comes into my FB feed regularly from Matthew Behrens. It is why I keep pointing our that Canada has not to this day stopped its genocidal treatment of indigenous youth. The government is refusing to pay the compensation ordered by the Tribunal to First Nation's youth. It reminds me of indigenous nations trying to get DFO to set the rules so they can exercise their Charter rights to fish. Apparently the government has to negotiate for the youths' own good.

The residential schools became the 60's scoop and then our current foster care system. There is a continuous unbroken pattern of governmental programs that have had a discriminatory effect on our indigenous youth. The idea that they are ancient history and the people were well intentioned flies in the face of human rights law and decisions by Canada's tribunals and courts tribunals.

I can imagine that some people were well intentioned when they got hired because there have always been whistle blowers who came and saw and then left screaming for justice. The ones that stayed because they needed the money or for what ever reason are guilty of perpetrating genocide. To put into perspective how legal systems view "innocent" abetters, if you are driving the get away car and your fellow robbers murder someone you are guilty of murder as well. If your fellow workers are beating, raping and abasing the children and you see it you either leave or you are as guilty as the actual sadistic pedophiles. That is our law not some idea that well intentioned people worked there and we should really try to see it from their perspective. A hundred years ago it was illegal to beat a child to death or to rape a child and everyone in the society understood that.

"For 2004 days Trudeau has refused to end racist discrimination against 165,000 Indigenous children."

cco

kropotkin1951 wrote:

To put into perspective how legal systems view "innocent" abetters, if you are driving the get away car and your fellow robbers murder someone you are guilty of murder as well.

That's the American felony murder rule. Canada's closest things to that, sections 230 and 229(c), were overturned in the Martineau case. Note that in this case I'm speaking legally, not morally. Morally, of course the government has ongoing culpability. And in practice, crimes committed by religious figures tend to be "accommodated" even when the victims are white; much more so, of course, when the victims are indigenous.

kropotkin1951

Thanks for the clarification CCO. I was thinking more of the aiding and abetting parts of the Criminal Code and murder was a poor choice of offence to use as an example since death by mischance has so many layers of possible verdicts.

Parties to offence

  • 21 (1) Every one is a party to an offence who

    • (a) actually commits it;

    • (b) does or omits to do anything for the purpose of aiding any person to commit it; or

    • (c) abets any person in committing it.

    • Common intention

  • (2) Where two or more persons form an intention in common to carry out an unlawful purpose and to assist each other therein and any one of them, in carrying out the common purpose, commits an offence, each of them who knew or ought to have known that the commission of the offence would be a probable consequence of carrying out the common purpose is a party to that offence.

  • R.S., c. C-34, s. 21

Date modified: 2021-07-12