Canada's Next Federal Election

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cco

alan smithee wrote:

cco. You are from Montreal,right?

Yes.

alan smithee wrote:

So you can't ignore the constant condo projects. You can't ignore all the shitty apartment buildings being renovated into high priced luxury apartments.

Talking about renovations, what do you think of 'renoviction'

Down the street from me, tenants have been evicted so the landlord can renovate and make it a bed and breakfast.

Have you also noticed all these condos that are rented out as hotel rooms? Have you seen  all the tents popping up here? Have you taken the metro and see all the people sleeping on the ground?

I've noticed all these things, and I'm as outraged as you are. The word "foreigner" is doing heavy lifting here, though, and I want to distinguish between people who don't live in Canada and buy condos here as a form of investment for their (often dirty) overseas cash and people who do live in Montreal but were born in another country.

Since the housing market now basically exists only for money laundering and all levels of government are keeping wages suppressed to the extent that people my age and younger can kiss the idea of ownership goodbye, federal and provincial governments need to invest massively in public housing. At the same time, these governments should look into some sort of landlord-to-work program to help landlords transition from living off others to the dignity of productive work. Or do those clichés only apply to the poor? (Not aimed at you, alan.)

The Canadian housing market is an utter failure. But yelling "It's the foreigners' fault!" seems largely untrue, completely unhelpful, and likely to bring altogether the wrong kind of allies onboard.

NorthReport

Disturbing report shows need to invest in Public Health Agency of Canada

 

 Premier of Ontario Photography/Flickr

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), the fulcrum of national efforts to combat COVID-19, has been struggling to fulfil its role since the onset of the pandemic. That's the shocking conclusion of an internal federal government review of PHAC's pandemic response.

The Health Canada/PHAC Office of Audit and Evaluation conducted the review and completed its report in September 2020.

In late January 2021, PHAC released that report to the House of Commons committee examining Canada's COVID-19 response. The majority of members of Parliament voted to set up that special committee in October 2020, even though the governing Liberals opposed the idea.

The pandemic response review is merciless in its observations of PHAC's shortcomings. It should engender much public discussion, given the Public Health Agency's importance at this time.

So far, there have been a few news media stories on the report and, in the House, the NDP's Don Davies put one question about it to Health Minister Patty Hajdu. But this document deserves more attention.

Not enough scientific and specialized staff

At the outset, the review states bluntly that PHAC has lacked "the breadth and depth of human resources required to support an emergency response of this never-seen-before magnitude, complexity and duration."

The report identifies what it calls "skills capacity gaps across the agency." Of greatest concern is the lack of medical expertise at PHAC.

The evaluators find that the federal agency charged with coordinating all national efforts to counter epidemics, pandemics, and similar widespread health threats lacks "public health expertise, including epidemiologists, psychologists, behavioural scientists and physicians at senior levels."

In the case of senior-level physicians, the review notes they would be "of particular importance for any type of response coordinated through PHAC."

And such high-level medical expertise is not the only area where PHAC falls short. The review also notes gaps "with respect to specific operational requirements, including specialized resources such as quarantine officers, personal protective equipment (PPE) specialists, nurses, environmental health officers, and project managers."

During the period of the pandemic examined by the evaluation -- from late 2019 to September 2020 -- this lack of "operational capacity" affected "several areas of PHAC's COVID-19 response, especially its border presence."

Prior to the pandemic, PHAC could support federal government border services staff at all points of entry to Canada from one central office, its Ottawa headquarters. The pandemic changed that, but PHAC, and the government of Canada more generally, were not prepared for that change.

Because of the new requirement that travellers quarantine or self-isolate upon arrival in Canada -- and the resulting need to set up regional quarantine facilities, infrastructure, and processes -- PHAC had to quickly and significantly ramp up its front-line, border operations. It was a challenge the agency had difficulty meeting.

A big part of the problem was staff, and PHAC tried hiring new people to fill the urgent new needs.

"However," the review points out, "because of the unique requirements of certain positions (such as quarantine officers and environmental health officers) it was challenging to identify those with the required qualifications for immediate deployment." The evaluators add that it can take "several months before new staff are fully qualified."

Inability to undertake strategic planning

Outside of operations, on the policy and planning side, the review identifies significant weaknesses within PHAC.

The agency's office of strategic policy and planning, the review comments, was a small shop before the pandemic, which "did not have the capacity to address the significant increase in the volume of requests from cabinet and parliamentarians regarding the COVID-19 response."

This lack of strategic capacity has hobbled PHAC's efforts to determine priority activities and assign the right people to handle those priorities.

Even with the addition of new professionals from other government departments, the evaluators are not sure the agency has the staff with the required expertise it needs to plan and assign resources efficiently and effectively.

Indeed, the evaluators express significant concern with staffing for PHAC's COVID-19 response in all its dimensions. Their report paints a picture that should raise alarm bells at the highest levels in government:

"Most positions associated with the response are staffed for a short time (i.e., a few weeks to a few months). This may create difficulties attracting and mobilizing staff and individuals with the required expertise to join the response. Individuals may be reluctant to leave their substantive position (within or outside of government) for a short-term position, and managers may be reluctant to release staff as they often cannot backfill positions for such short periods."

Money cannot solve all problems. But the evaluation does identify a way in which targeted spending could make a vast difference to PHAC's staffing challenges.

One of the main staffing issues is that PHAC is not funded to offer individuals, particularly from outside government, long-term, full-time positions. As well, for lack of funds, the agency has been unable to hire staff for specific positions that require significant training.

In this case, there is a solution.

The Trudeau government has readily embraced the need to invest heavily in order to counter the pandemic and mitigate its impacts. Recently announced new government spending covers everything from acquisition of PPE and vaccines to income supports to assistance for small business.

Somehow, however, the government seems to have overlooked the need to adequately finance the key federal agency at the heart of Canada's pandemic fight.

Getting PHAC the money it needs to staff itself adequately -- either by re-allocating existing money or voting for new money -- would not be brain surgery. If the Liberals needed legislation to achieve this aim, they would not have trouble finding support in Parliament to pass it.

Need to rethink PHAC 

There is much more in this exhaustive report, which should be made available online, in its entirety, soon.

PHAC is still a young agency. The Liberal government of the day set it up in 2004, in the wake of the SARS outbreak of the previous year. While the Public Health Agency has other responsibilities, dealing with pandemics is an essential and central part of its mandate.

The previous Harper Conservatives were not overly keen on PHAC. That's in part because, except for the northern territories and First Nation communities, health-care delivery is almost entirely a provincial domain in Canada. The federal role in health is limited to providing financial transfers to the provinces and to such ancillary services as testing and approving new drugs, and inspecting food.

The Conservatives were suspicious of a costly federal agency that seemed to them to intrude on provincial jurisdiction. As well, they argued that much of what PHAC did, such as health promotion, was already on Health Canada's plate.

The Harper folks were also highly dubious of all government-financed scientific research, which they cut ruthlessly, especially in such areas as the environment.

Not surprisingly, when they had the chance, the Conservatives chipped away at PHAC's funding. During the Harper era, the agency's budget went from a high of over $900 million to a low of under $600 million.

Before the 2015 election that brought them to power, the Liberals were harshly critical of Harper's cuts to PHAC. Trudeau even referred to those cuts in October 2020, when explaining the agency's difficulties in fully confronting the current COVID-19 pandemic.

The truth is, though, that PHAC's total funds are the same today as they were at the end of the Harper era. As well, when they were in opposition the Liberals disapproved when the Conservatives named a bureaucrat president of the agency, over the chief public health officer. Once in office, however, the Liberals continued that practice.

Around the world, and in Canada, the pandemic is provoking some major rethinking about a long list of public policy priorities.

The management and role of Canada's public health agency should be high on that list in this country.

Karl Nerenberg has been a journalist and filmmaker for more than 25 years. He is rabble's politics reporter.

Image credit: Premier of Ontario Photography/Flickr

https://rabble.ca/news/2021/01/disturbing-report-shows-need-invest-publi...

jerrym

The Angus Reid cited by North Report has some interesting data that goes beyond the party support: namely, O'Toole is being dragged down to a -15% in part by his, the party's and Trumps right-wing values, while Singh is by far the most popular opposition leader both with the public and within his party and at +8 while Trudeau is +2 in net favourability. The NDP is at least 20% in every region in the country, except in Quebec where it is at 14%, the latter being an increase of 4% over earlier polls. 

Looking at this with a net favourability rating, O’Toole scores a negative 15, while Singh boasts a plus eight. Green Party leader Annamie Paul continues to be an unknown to half of the country:

http://angusreid.org/federal-politics-january-2021/

O’Toole has defended against accusations that he has modeled himself as Canada’s version of Donald Trump, after his party utilized Trump-style language at various points in 2020. The CPC leader released a statement recently pushing back against this narrative, condemning white supremacy and outlining his views for a “moderate, pragmatic, mainstream” Conservative Party.

Unfortunately for O’Toole, Canadians this message has not yet begun to resonate or gain traction among Canadians. Nearly half (47%) now view him unfavourably, up from 31 per cent in September, shortly after the leadership race:

Nearly two-thirds (63%) of 2019 Conservative Party voters view O’Toole favourably. For NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, favourability sits at 89 per cent among its 2019 base, while 83 per cent of past Bloc Quebecois voters view Yves-Francois Blanchet positively:

 

Opinions of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau remain unchanged from their pre-holiday mark, with half approving of his performance (50%) and half feeling the opposite (48%):

More Key Findings:
 

Pondering

That is great news. The NDP is only 10 points behind the Conservatives nationally.  Quebec is unfortunate and Legault's fault. 

kropotkin1951

Pondering wrote:

That is great news. The NDP is only 10 points behind the Conservatives nationally.  Quebec is unfortunate and Legault's fault. 

I think it is because most people in Quebec agree with the religious symbols ban and they are prejudiced when it comes to anyone wearing a head covering. Also to do well in Quebec as a leader you have to have some claim to a connection. Layton's family history made him almost a Quebecer, despite his atrocious French.

The real question is who will win Ontario. The NDP will do well in BC but to be a meaningful party they need to win at least a third of the seats in Ontario.

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

Alan Smithee wrote:
BUT I think legislation needs to ban foreigners from buying real estate in Canada. You must be born here.

I support legislation banning people who don't live in Canada from buying real estate in Canada. I don't support banning foreign born residents of Canada from buying real estate.

Alan Smithee wrote:

If you reside here at minimum 3/4 of the year,you can buy real estate. Not rich foreigners who stay home outside the country just collecting money from our land and housing system.

I think that you would have to at minimum have a Canadioan passport

This I support.

Pondering

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Pondering wrote:

That is great news. The NDP is only 10 points behind the Conservatives nationally.  Quebec is unfortunate and Legault's fault. 

I think it is because most people in Quebec agree with the religious symbols ban and they are prejudiced when it comes to anyone wearing a head covering. Also to do well in Quebec as a leader you have to have some claim to a connection. Layton's family history made him almost a Quebecer, despite his atrocious French.

The real question is who will win Ontario. The NDP will do well in BC but to be a meaningful party they need to win at least a third of the seats in Ontario.

I mostly agree but Legault made it worse. The nationalists often do because they want to feed division and resentment against others.  

NorthReport

So did Canada not have a backup plan or is this just a no win situation?

Why do I get the hunch that allowing the private sector too much control of our health care has now endangered Canadians?

http://angusreid.org/covid19-vaccine-confidence/

jerrym

NorthReport wrote:
So did Canada not have a backup plan or is this just a no win situation? Why do I get the hunch that allowing the private sector too much control of our health care has now endangered Canadians? http://angusreid.org/covid19-vaccine-confidence/[/quote]

 

 

With that plunge in confidence from +24% (47-23) to -8% (36-44) between December and January that Trudeau is doing a good job in dealing with the vaccine situation, there is less likelihood of him calling an election in the spring, although things could reverse again or get even worse depending on what happens with the vaccines and Covid variants over time. The survey also shows how quickly opinions can change. Of course the Liberals even with poor numbers may decide to go in the spring if they think the odds are good that more problems are only going to make the situation worse for them electorally.

It is obvious why the Liberals keep repeating that everyone who wants a vaccination will get one by September, even though they are not in charge of producing the vaccines, especially when vaccine nationalism is growing and Canada does not make any vaccines of its own, and they don't know for sure how effective the vaccines will be against new variants.

To truly start to control this virus we will need worldwide vaccination or new variants will continually outdo the vaccines. 

 

jerrym

Its not just Keystone that is a problem for Canada's fossil fuel promoters. In an earlier post I described how Trudeau while mouthing climate change platitudes was promoting fossil fuel production and pipelines. As bad as the situation I described has been, it is getting worse, leaving the Liberal government and Canadians in a very difficult position because they have failed to shift from fossil fuel to green energy. These problems are becoming an increasing threat to the Trudeau government popularity and the provincial premiers supporting fossil fuel development. 

There are new threats to other existing pipelines, specifically lines 3, that Trudeau pushed through from Alberta to Manitoba that is now facing indigenous resistance after six years of court battles in the US similar to that of Standing Rock North Dakota, and line 5, which the Michigan governor is threatening to shutdown. Trudeau was questioned in Parliament yesterday about the threat of the Michigan governor to shutdown  line 5, which "the move would have a devastating impact on the Canadian economy, vaporizing thousands of jobs and cutting off a crucial supply of gasoline and jet fuel to Ontario and Quebec. " 

Line 5 piepline

The Canadian government continues to press U.S. officials to avoid the shutdown of a key pipeline supplying southern Ontario, marking another point of conflict in the energy relationship between the two countries after Keystone XL was scrapped last week.

Officials in Michigan are looking to force the shutdown of Line 5, a pipeline carrying 540,000 barrels of Canadian oil and other petroleum products each day from Superior, Wis., to refineries in Sarnia, Ont. 

https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/its-a-big-threat-canadian-officia...

Line 3 pipeline

On January 2, 2021, during the first weekend of the New Year, dozens of water protectors gathered to demonstrate and pray along Great River Road near Palisade, Minnesota. They joined in song, protesting a controversial tar sands oil pipeline called Line 3, which is currently being constructed through northern Minnesota and traditional Anishinaabe lands. Ojibwe tribes have helped spearhead the opposition to this pipeline, alongside Indigenous and environmental groups.

A clash with police hours later resulted in the arrest of 14 demonstrators. As one water protector, Shanai Matteson, described the confrontation: “There were more police, and fewer Water Protectors, in an unreasonable show of force by officers … who escalated the situation.”     ...

This Indigenous-led resistance to the Line 3 pipeline is reminiscent of Standing Rock in North Dakota, where, since 2015, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has led fellow Native and non-Native water protectors in taking a stand against the Dakota Access pipeline, which ultimately went into operation in 2017. Both of these battles over new tar sands pipelines also have featured direct action demonstrations and legal challenges, all with significant stakes for Native rights and sovereignty, the integrity of impacted water bodies and land, and the global climate.

In Minnesota, the fight over Line 3 has dragged on for over six years. Now, with the Canadian-based energy pipeline giant Enbridge Corporation commencing construction, opponents are continuing their resistance on the ground and in the courts.

https://www.desmogblog.com/2021/01/08/enbridge-line-3-pipeline-indigenou...

Here's a list of the problems Trudeau has already had with pipelines and fossil fuel development:  the $17 billion purchase and ever-rising construction costs of the  Trans Mountain pipeline to the BC coast to triple tarsands oil transportation that Kinder Morgan was ready to abandon because it didn't make financial sense; the Keystone pipeline that Trudeau supported despite being blocked by Obama and under threat for a year and then closed by Biden; Trudeau was ready to approve the Frontier Mine in Alberta, which "would  cover 24,000-hectares  until Teck Resources pulled out of the plan because it determined it would not work financially; the proposed a $14 billion LNG pipeline from Ontario to Saguenay Quebec for export to Europe, Asia and Brazil that only failed to come to fruition when Warren Buffet concluded it was not going to work financially and refused to invest in it; the Trudeau government changed offshore drilling rules in Newfoundland in order to make it easier for the fossil fuel industry to meet them and then proclaiming that the industry must live up to those standards while environmental organizations complain about the changes. The Liberal government has also excluded new drilling from environmental assessment there;  Trudeau was ready to support Energy East until strong opposition from Quebec to the building of the pipeline threatened his 40 Liberal seats in Quebec; the latest example is in Newfoundland  the $41.5 giveaway to Husky Oil in December by the Trudeau governmen to keep the "idled West White Rose offshore oil project going, particularly to "protect the option of restarting" in the next year, the $41.5 million, which is half the project cost, which is in addition to the $325 million the Trudeau government handed the Liberal Newfoundland government to support the Newfoundland oil industry in September, as well as to the granting of three new oil drilling exploration sites off Newfoundland two weeks ago.

NorthReport

What better opportunity could the NDP hope for?

Could the Skidding Vaccine Rollout Be the Thing that Crashes the Liberals?

The stakes could not be higher for Justin Trudeau right now.

https://thetyee.ca/Analysis/2021/01/29/Skidding-Vaccine-Rollout-Crashes-...

NorthReport

With Don Davies as the NDP Health Critic, what better opportunity could progressive Canadians and the NDP hope for? This should be a piece of cake for you Jagmeet.

Could the Skidding Vaccine Rollout Be the Thing that Crashes the Liberals?

The stakes could not be higher for Justin Trudeau right now.

https://thetyee.ca/Analysis/2021/01/29/Skidding-Vaccine-Rollout-Crashes-...

NorthReport

Canada's per capita vaccine distribution has now dramatically dropped down to 20th position, so perhaps Ottawa needs to stop patting themselves on the back, eh!  

How New Zealand Handled One Community Case of COVID-19

It’s a much different place than BC, but its rapid response to a slippery infection could be a blueprint for others.

https://thetyee.ca/Analysis/2021/01/28/How-New-Zealand-Handled-COVID-Com...

NorthReport

NDP repays multimillion-dollar campaign debt amid tough fundraising climate during pandemic

Party turns to holding April convention and preparing for possible federal election

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/ndp-campaign-debt-repays-pandemic-1.589...

melovesproles

I don't think the NDP will make gains in Ontario. The province seems very entrenched in red/blue voting habits and the NDP has done nothing to offer any compelling alternative that would shake things up and change the conversation. Basically the argument is we are slightly better less corrupt Liberals who will do more of what we campaign on. Which should be enough to protect their current seats, I don't see why NDP voters would switch Liberal when it is pretty clear that the fiscal austerity wing in the Liberal party were put on the backbench due to the NDP having the balance of power. 

I still think an election would bring back a similar result. Trudeau is fortunate the rest of the parties have lacklustre leadership but the Liberals haven't been knocking it out of the park either. The wildcard for me is always Quebec. If Bloc support crumbles, maybe a Liberal majority could be in the cards but if that doesn't happen, I'd expect we see a similar result.

NorthReport

What are we waiting for?

Renationalize Canada’s Airlines

BY

GERARD DI TROLIO

The pandemic has exposed some terminal defects in Canada’s deregulated, privately owned airline industry. Nationalization is the best way to make air travel viable, environmentally sustainable, and in tune with social needs.

The federal government has already given Air Canada $400 million in wage subsidies — more than any other publicly traded company in the country. It makes little sense for the government to keep pouring money into the airline when it has no public equity stake. (Wikimedia Commons)

 

https://jacobinmag.com/2021/01/airline-industry-air-canada-nationalizati...

NorthReport

What is it going to take for Canada to have a First Nations person as Governor-General? 

NorthReport

Stop making our letter carriers deliver neo fascist literature.

Canada Post mail carrier disciplined for refusing to deliver Epoch Times

Mail carrier says he took a stand and faced discipline for refusing to deliver copies of the publication

https://leaderpost.com/news/local-news/canada-post-mail-carrier-discipli...

 

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

NorthReport wrote:

Stop making our letter carriers deliver neo fascist literature.

Canada Post mail carrier disciplined for refusing to deliver Epoch Times

Mail carrier says he took a stand and faced discipline for refusing to deliver copies of the publication

https://leaderpost.com/news/local-news/canada-post-mail-carrier-discipli...

 

 

A few years back, a mail carrier in Saskatchewan was also disciplined for refusing to deliver copies of an anti-abortion campaign mailer that featured grusome images of dead foetuses. The memory is a bit hazy but I think that was the case and not someone who was upset that they weren't allowed to deliver it.

kropotkin1951

NorthReport wrote:

What is it going to take for Canada to have a First Nations person as Governor-General? 

Finding an indigenous person who is willing to be the figure head of a racist government that has been in breach of the CHR tribunal for over 5 years because of its discrimination against First Nations communities and whose military wing is occupying unceded Wetʼsuwetʼen territory on behalf of foreign oil companies.

NorthReport

 Jagmeet Singh/Facebook

NDP: Take profit out of long-term care, publicly produce vaccines in Canada

 

We now have much data which shows -- in the words of one report -- there is a "lower quality of care" in privately owned, for-profit long-term care facilities than in public or not-for-profit homes.

In November, when it issued that report, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) suggested Canadian governments, both federal and provincial, should make moves to eventually abolish the for-profit long-term care sector. The CCPA said doing so should be a key part of any federal exercise in setting national standards for long-term care.

Last week, New Democratic Party Leader Jagmeet Singh took up that call. 

Private long-term care businesses have inevitably chosen to focus more on dividends to shareholders than services to their residents, Singh argued. That has meant cutting corners on staff and services in order to squeeze the maximum profit out of the businesses. The result, during the COVID-19 pandemic, is that many people have died unnecessarily.

Singh wants the federal government to finally come out with its long-promised standards for long-term care. He says they should base those standards, and their application, on the health-care standards of the 1984 Canada Health Act.  

Echoing the CCPA, the NDP leader also now demands that the federal government bring all for-profit long-term care homes into the public or not-for-profit sectors.

When pressed on the latter point, Singh had to admit it is not within the federal government's power to change the status of long-term care homes. They fall entirely within provincial jurisdiction. To achieve a transition to fully public or not-for-profit long-term care the federal government would have to work with the provinces.

A good start, Singh says, would be for the federal government to offer new money to the provinces for their long-term systems, but with significant strings attached.

One of those strings could be that all new facilities, all new beds, must be public or not for profit.

Another could be that workers in long-term care should be engaged on a full-time basis, with adequate pay, and that there should be a minimum staff-to-resident ratio.

Federal money could also be contingent on provinces establishing rigorous inspection regimes for the long-term care sector.

These and other similar measures would have the ultimate effect of moving the system away from the for-profit model. The added costs of abiding by all of these new regulations would mean long-term care would no longer work as a cash cow for investors.

And talking about investors, a federal government entity owns one of the major players in the long-term care business, the Revera corporation, lock, stock and barrel. That federal entity is the Public Sector Pension Investment Board (PSPIB), which manages the pension money of federal civil servants.

Singh argues the federal government could make a good start toward getting the profit motive out of all long-term care facilities by transforming Revera into a public rather than for-profit corporation.

Given the sad record of Revera during the pandemic -- there have been 230 deaths at its facilities -- the Trudeau government would have a sound public policy motive to act decisively in this case.

Sadly, based on experience, taking decisive actions that risk annoying powerful corporate interests and the investor class is not something the Trudeau Liberals are prone to do.

Revera is a massive multi-tentacled corporation. Its holdings include 186 long-term care communities that it manages, 225 it owns outright, and more than 22,500 units it manages.

It owns other health-care businesses as well, in Canada, in the U.S. and in the U.K. Historically, Revera has had extensive political connections, especially with the Ontario Conservative Party.

The Public Service Alliance of Canada, the union that represents many federal workers, supports the New Democrats on this one, even if it will mean their pension fund will have to find other ways of earning cash.

The NDP could prod the Trudeau Liberals to get up their gumption and take a bold step on Revera by outlining a detailed road map as to how they would go about buying out the PSPIB and transforming the company from a for-profit to a not-for-profit model.

A Crown corporation for vaccines

While they're at it, the NDP leader has also suggested the federal government should extend its reach into the vaccine business. It should set up a public company, a Crown corporation, to manufacture vaccines in Canada.

"Conservatives cut our capacity to make vaccines here in Canada," Singh says. "They shut down the publicly owned facility for making vaccines. The Liberals had years but did not reopen it. We are vulnerable because we cannot manufacture vaccines here at home, and we now need to rebuild that public manufacturing capacity."

This is not a new idea from the NDP. They proposed it months ago. Now, perhaps, given all the hiccups in Canada's vaccine rollout, largely due to unreliable supply, more people will be willing to consider the idea.

One who seems to have gotten the message is Dr. Alan Bernstein, a member of the federal government's COVID-19 task force and CEO of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

Without specifically mentioning the idea of a Crown corporation, Bernstein told the CBC that "we need domestic vaccine production capacity in the country for the next pandemic and also for this pandemic. If there are variants arising, we may be designing second-, third-generation vaccines and vaccinating the population for the next two or three years."

When eminent medical experts join their voices to those of opposition party leaders, perhaps it is time for the government to take heed.

Karl Nerenberg has been a journalist and filmmaker for more than 25 years. He is rabble's politics reporter.

Image credit: Jagmeet Singh/Facebook

https://rabble.ca/news/2021/02/take-profit-out-long-term-care-publicly-p...

NorthReport

COVID-19 Vaccine Developers Want to Keep Getting Billions in Public Money With No Strings Attached

BY

JULIA ROCK

Drug companies have received over $10 billion from the US government for COVID-19 vaccine production. Yet those companies weren’t required to offer their vaccines at fair prices or share intellectual property rights — and they want to keep it that way.

https://jacobinmag.com/2021/02/covid-vaccine-developers-pfizer-johnson-g...

NorthReport

Minority Government for Ottawa again is my choice

https://m.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/ppe-question-period_ca_6019ad61c5b6c2d...

NorthReport

Worth a read!

Canada’s NDP Should Stop Making Excuses and Find Ways To Win

BY

ROBERTA LEXIER

There’s wide support for the kind of social-democratic policies Canada's New Democratic Party should be offering, but the party is afraid to put forward a bold left-wing program that can inspire supporters. The NDP’s history shows how it’s possible for a left party to succeed against the tide.

https://jacobinmag.com/2021/02/canada-ndp-strategy

NorthReport

In the 1970s, Social Democracy Was in Retreat. British Columbia’s NDP Fought for It, Anyway.

BY

JOËL LAFOREST

Dave Barrett’s NDP government in British Columbia was one of the most impressive examples of social democracy in action during the twilight of the Keynesian era. But the BC NDP lacked a proper strategy to deal with the power of capital, which eventually forced it into retreat.

Dave Barrett was the premier of British Columbia from 1972 and 1975. (Getty Images)

https://jacobinmag.com/2021/01/ndp-canada-british-columbia-social-democr...

NorthReport

Canada’s Only Social-Democratic Government Has Been Decisively Reelected in British Columbia

BY

DERRICK O'KEEFE

British Columbia has historically been dominated by right-wing governments, so last weekend’s overwhelming New Democratic Party win is a significant moment. John Horgan, the first two-term NDP premier in the province's history, needs to set out a more ambitious agenda in his second term.

New Democratic Party premier John Horgan speaking in Comox, British Columbia, 2017. (BC NDP / Flickr)

 

https://jacobinmag.com/2020/10/canada-social-democratic-reelection-briti...

NorthReport

What Canada’s Social Democrats Must Do

BY

GERARD DI TROLIO

When the Canadian parliament reconvenes this month, the Liberals will likely need the New Democratic Party to retain power. The center-left NDP’s support should not come from petty electoral calculation, but from an understanding that bold action is needed by both the country and the party.

Jagmeet Singh at the Ontario Federation of Labour Convention in November 2017. Photo: OFL Communications Department / Wikimedia Commons

 

https://jacobinmag.com/2020/09/canada-ndp-trudeau-jagmeet-singh

NorthReport

No More Excuses. It’s Time to Fight for a Left Program in Canada.

BY

JOËL LAFOREST

The last time Canada’s center-left New Democratic Party was this important in Parliament, Justin Trudeau’s father, Pierre, was prime minister. In the 1970s, the social democrats were able to win important concessions. Today, the outlook is far bleaker. We need to demand real action.

Jagmeet Singh, the current leader of the New Democratic Party. (NDP / Facebook)

 

https://jacobinmag.com/2020/09/canada-ndp-trudeau-liberals

NorthReport

What are you waiting for NDP? The Liberals to outflank you on the Left.

https://mobile.twitter.com/kylegriffin1/status/1356716919928184833

NorthReport
NorthReport
Mighty Middle

Jigar Patel, the former NDP candidate for Regina-Lewvan in 2019, has joined the Conservative Party of Canada

https://twitter.com/Erin_Weir/status/1356776787926253571?s=20

NorthReport

Don Davies officially nominated as NDP candidate for Vancouver Kingsway

https://voiceonline.com/don-davies-officially-nominated-as-ndp-candidate...

NorthReport
NorthReport

Facial Recognition Software Has Been Used by 48 Agencies in Canada

Privacy commissioners share findings on Clearview AI, and ask for wider powers.

https://thetyee.ca/News/2021/02/03/Facial-Recognition-Software-Used-By-4...

NorthReport

After reading this report which everyone should read by-the-way, as it is written by Crawford Killan, one of the best journalists in Canada, I gather we won't be having an election anytime soon.

Experts Rated 98 Nations Handling COVID. Canada Was 61st

Top performers had little in common politically, the think tank found.

 

Trudeau was among the ditherers, though he earned a lot of sympathy when his wife contracted COVID-19 and he quarantined his whole family — emerging daily on his front porch to update the country, looking tired and older in his new beard.

Months before COVID-19 appeared in China, Trudeau’s government had shut down the Global Public Health Intelligence Network, whose purpose was precisely to spot outbreaks around the world and assess their threat to Canada. He had staffed the Public Health Agency of Canada with civil servants, not scientists (PHAC’s civil-servant president Tina Namiesniowski abruptly resigned last September). And he had expelled Jane Philpott, his highly competent minister of health, in the wake of the SNC-Lavalin affair.

So Justin Trudeau’s grave demeanour in those updates may also have reflected his knowledge of how ill-equipped he and Canada were.

Better said, he and the provinces and territories. As in the U.S., our response was run chiefly on the provincial level, and our premiers tend to be more concerned about the health of the economy than that of their citizens. Hence the uneven responses over the past year, with half-hearted lockdowns and premature reopenings. As on the international level, provinces may look good compared to their neighbours but only by underperforming less badly.

https://thetyee.ca/Analysis/2021/02/03/Experts-Rated-98-Nations-Handling...

NorthReport

Just another CBC commercial for the Liberals

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/grenier-liberal-lead-polls-1.5899467

NorthReport

They should run as Liberals with Trudeau in the next election

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kielburger-political-roadkill-1.5899542

NorthReport
NorthReport

Abacus

L 32, Down 3
C 31, No Change
N 18, up 1

Pondering

NorthReport wrote:
https://www.macleans.ca/politics/why-justin-trudeau-is-no-1-on-the-2021-...

(Paul Wells) And finally, it’s become clear that Justin Trudeau is the brains of the operation. It used to be fashionable to believe he was Oz the Great and Terrible, a photogenic puppet, and that behind the curtain Gerald Butts and Katie Telford were pulling the levers. 

He has got to be joking. Trudeau isn't stupid but he is not politically saavy. He is what he said he would be, the chairman of the board not the CEO. No single person is the "CEO" but there isn't much in the way of disagreement between his advisors. Freeland is probably his top advisor now. He did nothing about Payette because there was no one to tell him what to do on it. The people advising him didn't care about the GG position. They care about "the economy" if lining their pockets can be considered "the economy".  

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I agree with you, Pondering. Trudeau is not a brilliant strategist or even a strategic thinker from what I have seen. He is a gifted performer and I think he seems to be naturally empathetic which distinguishes him greatly from stone hearted Harper. As for Harper, he wasn't the brilliant thinker that he tried to portray himself as - more of a conniving manipulator.

Pondering

NorthReport wrote:
They should run as Liberals with Trudeau in the next election https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kielburger-political-roadkill-1.5899542[/...

The WE contract controversy is not what hurt them. It was the discovery that only part of WE is a charity. The other part is a business. 

 

NorthReport

Our Canadian government has made quite a mess of our pandemic challenge A Harvard medical school doctor has stated that if everyone in the US wore an N95 (not KN95) mask the pandemic would be reduced by 4 to 1 in the US

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/n95-masks-not-a-priority-documents-1.59...

https://www.pennlive.com/coronavirus/2021/01/expert-says-use-of-n95-mask...

NorthReport

With such a dismal performance fighting covid so much for Trudeau calling a snap election

https://www.thestar.com/politics/political-opinion/2021/02/14/heres-why-...

NorthReport

Most Canadians blame federal government for vaccine delays

https://www.nationalnewswatch.com/2021/02/16/poll-finds-most-canadians-b...

NorthReport

Disband conflucted, secretive, task force behind flawed vaccine effort

https://windsorstar.com/news/politics/disband-conflicted-secretive-task-...

NorthReport
Mighty Middle

Jagmeet Singh just said in Question Period and on CTV that he will NOT defeat the government on a confidence vote and trigger an election. Not until the majority of the Canadian population is Vaccinated

But when asked if that means he will support an upcoming Liberal Budget, Singh didn't answer either way. Just saying he will work with the government.

kropotkin1951

Mighty Middle wrote:

Jagmeet Singh just said in Question Period and on CTV that he will NOT defeat the government on a confidence vote and trigger an election. Not until the majority of the Canadian population is Vaccinated

But when asked if that means he will support an upcoming Liberal Budget, Singh didn't answer either way. Just saying he will work with the government.

If neither the NDP or Liberals vote on the budget and the Cons and Bloc vote against it that will leave the fate of the government up to the 5 independents.

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