How the NDP frustrates me

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pegasus
How the NDP frustrates me

Two days the Federal election was called, I went out on a limb and decided to run as a member of the NDP in my old riding where I grew up. I went out and collected signatures (which took me a few days) and ended up with more than the 100 necessary. I then went to my local NDP office and asked if I could run as a member of the NDP, whom I had voted for every election since I could vote.

I have always wanted to work for the Federal Government. I have taken their tests and apply for all the jobs that are posted that I believe I am qualified for. I even once considered the military. But never to any avail. I am right now working a decent job in the private industry, but it has never been my dream. So I decided to go for a seat.

Running as a local NDP candidate did not guarantee me a win. Where I wanted to run has been a Liberal stronghold for the last 50 years. But I figured I'd give it a shot. Being my first go at this, I listened to everything they told me and took everything as gospel. I brought my signatures to the office and my credentials, and I was told that I was not qualified. That being said, I packed up my stuff and left the office, and on election night I voted for the NDP, as I always do.

I live in Quebec, and I finished University quite some time ago with a major/minor in Psychology/Education. I spent 10 years volunteering with children. I helped at a mental institution for 2 years. I've collected funds for the poor. I speak both official languages and I was born in Ottawa, raised in Montreal and now live in Quebec City which is 99 percent French.

Under normal circumstances I wouldn't complain, however, when I saw the credentials of some of the candidates who had actually become NDP candidates, one of which was in the riding I wanted to run in and who had far less credentials than I, and won, I almost flipped. So as you can all see, I'm a little upset with the NDP party right now and their caucus of fully qualified individuals, of which I am apparently not :(

So my question is; how come I was told I was not qualified to run as an NDP candidate in this election when there were others who had far less qualifications than I, who won?

Regions: 
Fidel

I would have voted for you with those credentials, pegasus. We did elect quite a few women this time. I think we are well represented in this regard but could do even better next time. Just a thought. Don't give up.

youngsocialist

Same thing happened to a former professor.. Maybe they're looking for people who've graduated from community college and worked as an assistant manager at a pub..

Arthur Cramer Arthur Cramer's picture

I am completely unable to answer that. I don't know why some of things that occured did as they did. I am so sorry.

Please don't give up; we need you

pegasus

Fidel wrote:

I would have voted for you with those credentials, pegasus. We did elect quite a few women this time. I think we are well represented in this regard but could do even better next time. Just a thought. Don't give up.

 

Thanks Fidel. But I am very upset with the NDP party. After being a member for the last 20 years and to be treated the way I am, I am considering giving up. After the election, I went to congratulate my MP and offer my services to help him out, and he and one other person gave me a torn slip of paper, wrote an e-mail address on it, and said "send it here". When I got home, I did. That was May 3rd. I'm still waiting for a response.

SRB

pegasus wrote:

Thanks Fidel. But I am very upset with the NDP party. After being a member for the last 20 years and to be treated the way I am, I am considering giving up. After the election, I went to congratulate my MP and offer my services to help him out, and he and one other person gave me a torn slip of paper, wrote an e-mail address on it, and said "send it here". When I got home, I did. That was May 3rd. I'm still waiting for a response.

The new MPs are probably still getting oriented in Ottawa (not that this excuses the lack of response).  I'm just curious:  aren't there riding associations in Quebec? 

When we moved to Saskatchewan from the East, the very first thing my partner did was to find out about the local riding associations, provincially and federally.  Then he joined them both, and began attending meetings.  If there is no riding association, then they really are in terrible disarray in your area. 

If you are discouraged, then understandably you might not want to be involved, but if you are able to stick it out, perhaps you can join or found a riding association.  Remember, riding associations need members, need Presidents and Treasurers etc. in order to function, to have meetings.  If the new MP has no riding association, he or she will be in a desperate situation with regards to the riding and its relationship to the local community, and will have difficulty getting organized.

 

pegasus

SRB wrote:

 

The new MPs are probably still getting oriented in Ottawa (not that this excuses the lack of response).  I'm just curious:  aren't there riding associations in Quebec? 

When we moved to Saskatchewan from the East, the very first thing my partner did was to find out about the local riding associations, provincially and federally.  Then he joined them both, and began attending meetings.  If there is no riding association, then they really are in terrible disarray in your area. 

If you are discouraged, then understandably you might not want to be involved, but if you are able to stick it out, perhaps you can join or found a riding association.  Remember, riding associations need members, need Presidents and Treasurers etc. in order to function, to have meetings.  If the new MP has no riding association, he or she will be in a desperate situation with regards to the riding and its relationship to the local community, and will have difficulty getting organized.

 

There weren't any in Quebec City. At least none that I knew of. (I looked it up on the internet and called 411 to no avail.) But there was an office in Quebec City on Eugene-Lamontagne Ave. and that was where I presented myself as a candidate. I went there with my signatures, my diploma and references from my volunteer organizations. Someone, who happened to not be there when I returned on May 3rd, asked me a few questions, and then looked over everything, photocopied everything and then handed it all back to me and told me I was not qualified.

I left a little depressed, but I figured that the NDP already had all their candates of Doctors and Lawyers all lined up. I didn't even want to run in Quebec City, I would have ran in any riding anywhere in Canada. It didn't matter to me.

Malcolm Malcolm's picture

Pardon me for being suspicious, but we have an unknown babbler who just signed up and is telling us this tale of woe. 

The babbler claims that s/he wento to "my local NDP office."  Does the NDP have a "local office" in Quebec?

Normally, people interested in seeking the party's nomination will make some contact with the party prior to the writ.

Was the individual put through the vetting process that our candidates are required to go through to identify potential problems?  Was that the reason for the rejaction?

Or was it merely that the party had already nominated a candidate in the constituency before this person turned up?

Of course, I'm even more curious about a "young socialist" who would make disparaging remarks about citizens who attended community college or worked in pubs.

Frankly, I suspect both pegasus and young socialist are Liberal (or possibly Conservative or even Bloquiste) trolls.

Life, the unive...

I call bs. No one goes out and gets a hundred signatures without first ever talking to local, or even regional or national officials for any party.  No one goes and gets signatures and then shows up and says- 'oh Hi I plan to be the candidate'   It just does not happen that way.  Your story is full of holes.

I also question anyone who uses the term "NDP party" and yet claims to have been a member for 20 years.  It just doesn't add up.

Basement Dweller

Thanks Malcolm. You are right, this thread reeks of troll.

Policywonk

Life, the universe, everything wrote:

I call bs. No one goes out and gets a hundred signatures without first ever talking to local, or even regional or national officials for any party.  No one goes and gets signatures and then shows up and says- 'oh Hi I plan to be the candidate'   It just does not happen that way.  Your story is full of holes.

I also question anyone who uses the term "NDP party" and yet claims to have been a member for 20 years.  It just doesn't add up.

Not unless they are running as an independent. I agree, they're just trolling.

autoworker autoworker's picture

@ pegasus: Your recent experience, and subsequent feeling of alienation from a cause (a lost one in Quebec for much of the 20 years you supported it) speaks to a larger apathy/malaise, regarding party politics, not exclusive to the NDP/NPD.  That you voted NPD, despite your understanable frustration, indicates your selfless commitment to your belief in a just society.  Don't despair, your long-suffering determination to hold fast to your beliefs can surely be applied to other worthy endeavours.  Your work with the mentally ill, for instance, requires a special empathy that, alas, may not always be appreciated, when left to the dicsretion of party insiders.

pegasus

Malcolm wrote:

Pardon me for being suspicious, but we have an unknown babbler who just signed up and is telling us this tale of woe. 

The babbler claims that s/he wento to "my local NDP office."  Does the NDP have a "local office" in Quebec?

Normally, people interested in seeking the party's nomination will make some contact with the party prior to the writ.

Was the individual put through the vetting process that our candidates are required to go through to identify potential problems?  Was that the reason for the rejaction?

Or was it merely that the party had already nominated a candidate in the constituency before this person turned up?

Of course, I'm even more curious about a "young socialist" who would make disparaging remarks about citizens who attended community college or worked in pubs.

Frankly, I suspect both pegasus and young socialist are Liberal (or possibly Conservative or even Bloquiste) trolls.

I am not a troll and I have been an NDP party, paying member for 20 years. I have voted for the NDP at every Federal election since I was turned 18. I am 40 today. I went into Raymond Cote's office on Eugene Lamontagne Ave. here in Quebec City because I wanted to run as a member of MY PARTY. One that I have been a paying member of for the last 20 years. There is a vetting process, I would assume and actually hope for. That was the reason I went there. To submit my candidacy for for such a process. But a vetting process should take a little longer than 20 minutes, don't you think?

I had no idea about the existance of this site. I have asked the same question on another forum, and I was encouraged to ask it here seeing that perhaps I would get a better answer. I have tried writing to both the NDP party as well as my newly elected MP, but so far to no avail. I still do want to help the NDP in any way I could.

Life, the unive...

Again, you keep using the term "NDP party".  IF you were a member for 20 years, why would you use such a term. 

As well, anyone who just goes out and collects signatures - as you claim to have done - and then shows up and says "Hi- I want to be the candidate" is either bizzarely ignorant of the way the system works (since you claim to have been involved for 20 years) - or is leaving an awful lot out of their story.

 

Life, the unive...

I have collected signatures many times for the Greens in the past.  I could have done it in about 3 hours, not three days.  So again your story is full of holes.

pegasus

Life, the universe, everything wrote:

I call bs. No one goes out and gets a hundred signatures without first ever talking to local, or even regional or national officials for any party.  No one goes and gets signatures and then shows up and says- 'oh Hi I plan to be the candidate'   It just does not happen that way.  Your story is full of holes.

I also question anyone who uses the term "NDP party" and yet claims to have been a member for 20 years.  It just doesn't add up.

Oh no? Do you think its hard to get 100 signatures? I did it in less than 3 days by parking myself in front of a Maxi grocery store here in Quebec City. With my friends and family in Montreal, I had a total of 115.

And please explain to me...what's wrong with "NDP party". In Quebec its sometimes referred to as "partie npd"

I could also write New Democrats or New Democratic Party

pegasus

Life, the universe, everything wrote:

I have collected signatures many times for the Greens in the past.  I could have done it in about 3 hours, not three days.  So again your story is full of holes.

This is a strawman. It depends where you go. I maybe could have been able to choose a better place, but that is no one else's concern but mine. Remember, I've never done this before.

Freedom 55

pegasus wrote:

Its amazing that if there was a natural disaster or a war that were to break out within the next 4 years in Canada, that a barmaid and a teenager would be given all the protection this country has to offer, while we would all be left to die.

 

Are you saying that if you were an MP instead of the pub manager or teenager we would all be saved, rather than left for dead? 'Cause if it's just a matter of which 308 people receive special protection; frankly, whether it's you, Brosseau, or Dusseault who gets saved is of little importance to those of us who are left behind. No offence.

pegasus

Freedom 55 wrote:

 

 

Are you saying that if you were an MP instead of the pub manager or teenager we would all be saved, rather than left for dead? 'Cause if it's just a matter of which 308 people receive special protection; frankly, whether it's you, Brosseau, or Dusseault who gets saved is of little importance to those of who are left behind. No offence.

No. What I'm saying is there are better qualified people who were willing to run for the party, but were either turned away or ignored altogether. I could have found better qualified woman who actually lives in Berthier-Maskinonge to run as a candidate, than the one the NDP asked to run.

Life, the unive...

So just to recap - your first step to being a candidate was to collect signatures- not contact local, regional or national officials of the NDP to see for instance if there might - oh I don't know - already be a candidate in place.

You then did this over the course of three whole days-which would have been what 5 days into the election by the time you showed up to announce you wanted to be a candidate? 

And now you are making allegations about the NDP because you were obviously a good candidate based on your desire to have always wanted to work for the federal government- so naturally they should have just accepted you as a candidate- no questions asked.

As I have said you story doesn't add up and there are major big holes in it.

Malcolm Malcolm's picture

I hardly think a public message board is the place I'd go looking for an explanation.  I'd think it would make far more sense to contact the federal party office or the leader's office.  (A letter to Hon. Jack Layton, MP / House of Commons / Ottawa ON K1A 0A6 - you don't even need a stamp) would be a far more appropriate way of pursuing this rather than making obscure (and frankly odd-sounding) claims on a public website.

Pegasus, I grant that you may not be a troll, just as Justin Trudeau may be a progressive.  However, I'm not convinced on either score.

pegasus

Life, the universe, everything wrote:

Again, you keep using the term "NDP party".  IF you were a member for 20 years, why would you use such a term. 

As well, anyone who just goes out and collects signatures - as you claim to have done - and then shows up and says "Hi- I want to be the candidate" is either bizzarely ignorant of the way the system works (since you claim to have been involved for 20 years) - or is leaving an awful lot out of their story.

 

Then please...explain how one becomes a candidate so that I don't make the same mistake four years from now? I get newsletters from the New Democrats and it explans to me how. Is there actually another way? Because in my newsletter it tells me that I just have to submit my request for candidacy at any NDP office.

Life, the unive...

try contacting local party members. I just don't believe your story though.   I have worked with all kinds of candidates over the last 40 years and not once did someone who was a legitimate candidate just show up with Elections Canada documents saying they wanted to be the candidate.  Not once.  They were either approached, or they approached local people first.  Your story defies logic.

pegasus

Life, the universe, everything wrote:

So just to recap - your first step to being a candidate was to collect signatures- not contact local, regional or national officials of the NDP to see for instance if there might - oh I don't know - already be a candidate in place.

You then did this over the course of three whole days-which would have been what 5 days into the election by the time you showed up to announce you wanted to be a candidate? 

And now you are making allegations about the NDP because you were obviously a good candidate based on your desire to have always wanted to work for the federal government- so naturally they should have just accepted you as a candidate- no questions asked.

As I have said you story doesn't add up and there are major big holes in it.

As I wrote earlier, I've never done this before. When I realized an election was being called after the defeat of the budget, I wanted to run as a candidate. I heard that I needed 100 signatures to do this, so I picked up forms from the Elections Canada office and what I thought would be mighty difficult, was not so hard. I went to Montreal the weekend of the 19th and 20th of March and asked my friends and family to sign the forms. They did and when I returned to Quebec Ciy, I collected the rest outside of a grocery store. It was freezing outside, and I had no permission to ask the people inside the store, so it wasn't so easy, but by Wednesday I had more than 100 signatures. On thursday I went to the NDP office. I was vetted out in 20 minutes after they took photocopies of everything I brought with me.

pegasus

Malcolm wrote:

I hardly think a public message board is the place I'd go looking for an explanation.  I'd think it would make far more sense to contact the federal party office or the leader's office.  (A letter to Hon. Jack Layton, MP / House of Commons / Ottawa ON K1A 0A6 - you don't even need a stamp) would be a far more appropriate way of pursuing this rather than making obscure (and frankly odd-sounding) claims on a public website.

Pegasus, I grant that you may not be a troll, just as Justin Trudeau may be a progressive.  However, I'm not convinced on either score.

You are right, and thank you for the advice. I sent a message through the NDP website a few days ago, and I have tried contacting my new MP through this address [email protected] on May 3rd. I went that day to the office to congratulate m. Raymond Cote. He was with one other person, not the person I originally met on March 24th. I sent an e-mail there so I can assist them in whatever capacity, but I have yet to hear back from them.

Freedom 55

pegasus wrote:

Freedom 55 wrote:

Are you saying that if you were an MP instead of the pub manager or teenager we would all be saved, rather than left for dead? 'Cause if it's just a matter of which 308 people receive special protection; frankly, whether it's you, Brosseau, or Dusseault who gets saved is of little importance to those of us who are left behind. No offence.

No. What I'm saying is there are better qualified people who were willing to run for the party, but were either turned away or ignored altogether. I could have found better qualified woman who actually lives in Berthier-Maskinonge to run as a candidate, than the one the NDP asked to run.

Oh well. I guess Parliament's loss is Berthier-Maskinongé's gain. Instead of being mired in the relatively impotent role of backbencher in the Official Opposition, she/they/you are free to employ your many qualifications in your local grassroots fights against the Harper agenda.

 

pegasus wrote:

I went to Montreal the weekend of the 19th and 20th of March and asked my friends and family to sign the forms. They did and when I returned to Quebec Ciy, I collected the rest outside of a grocery store.

That may be part of the problem right there. The signatures have to come from people who ordinarily reside in the riding in which you intend to run. So unless your family and friends normally live in Quebec City (or all the people at the Maxi normally live in Montreal), it sounds like you were collecting signatures from people who live in different ridings.

 

pegasus

Freedom 55 wrote:

 

That may be part of the problem right there. The signatures have to come from people who ordinarily reside in the riding in which you intend to run. So unless your family and friends normally live in Quebec City (or all the people at the Maxi normally live in Montreal), it sounds like you were collecting signatures from people who live in different ridings.

 

Candidates File Nomination Papers

Each prospective candidate must file nomination papers with the returning office of the riding in which s/he intends to be a candidate. The nomination papers must be signed by at least 100 people who are eligible to vote in the riding in which the prospective candidate wishes to run. (In very large or remote ridings the minimum number of signatures is 50.) The candidate also has to pay a deposit of $1000.

The nomination papers must be received by the returning officer by the 21st day before election day.

This is where I messed up, I guess. It would have been nice if someone told me this however. I only needed 5 more signatures and I was far ahead of this 21 days to submit my candidacy. I wanted to run in the Montreal riding where I grew up, in which case I could have sent the lists to my mother who lives there, and she could have collected 80 more. Besides, I was under the impression that if there was any errors, the party would handle this?How did Ruth Ellen Brosseau collect her signatures if she never visited her riding?

David Young

I smell a rat here, named pegasus. (the mythical flying horse?  hmmmm!)

For this person to be a member of the NDP for how long (20 years?) and to not be aware during all that time that you need to have a nomination meeting where the selling of memberships to voting members of the public who come to the meeting to vote for a candidate is the process to go through (barring the appointment of a candidate in short notice due to a sudden election call)?

Sorry, but since the NDP is now the Official Opposition, I sense that the Liberal/Conservative dirty tricks brigade has begun their ground war to destabilize the NDP in their new power base in Quebec.

 

Unionist

pegasus wrote:
Being my first go at this, I listened to everything they told me and took everything as gospel. I brought my signatures to the office and my credentials, and I was told that I was not qualified. That being said, I packed up my stuff and left the office, and on election night I voted for the NDP, as I always do.

Someone told you "you're not qualified". Before packing your stuff and leaving, did you take a moment to ask this someone:

"Why am I not qualified?"

Obviously you must have, given that you "listened to everything they told me and took everything as gospel".

So, what answer did you receive as to why you were not qualified?

 

pegasus

David Young wrote:

I smell a rat here, named pegasus. (the mythical flying horse?  hmmmm!)

For this person to be a member of the NDP for how long (20 years?) and to not be aware during all that time that you need to have a nomination meeting where the selling of memberships to voting members of the public who come to the meeting to vote for a candidate is the process to go through (barring the appointment of a candidate in short notice due to a sudden election call)?

Sorry, but since the NDP is now the Official Opposition, I sense that the Liberal/Conservative dirty tricks brigade has begun their ground war to destabilize the NDP in their new power base in Quebec.

 

A nomination meeting in every riding? Since when? People were asked to run: In this new interview with Ruth-Ellen it says she was asked by the party to run in the riding.
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/decision-canada/Vegas+visiting+Quebec+B...

pegasus

Unionist wrote:

 

Someone told you "you're not qualified". Before packing your stuff and leaving, did you take a moment to ask this someone:

"Why am I not qualified?"

Obviously you must have, given that you "listened to everything they told me and took everything as gospel".

So, what answer did you receive as to why you were not qualified?

 

I assumed that what the person said was the truth, and that the NDP actually had a line-up of candidates who were more qualified than I was.

janfromthebruce

yes, I read the tale of woe last night and closed the screen. Same thoughts ran through my head and decided responding was encouraging the trolling.

 

Malcolm wrote:

Pardon me for being suspicious, but we have an unknown babbler who just signed up and is telling us this tale of woe. 

The babbler claims that s/he wento to "my local NDP office."  Does the NDP have a "local office" in Quebec?

Normally, people interested in seeking the party's nomination will make some contact with the party prior to the writ.

Was the individual put through the vetting process that our candidates are required to go through to identify potential problems?  Was that the reason for the rejaction?

Or was it merely that the party had already nominated a candidate in the constituency before this person turned up?

Of course, I'm even more curious about a "young socialist" who would make disparaging remarks about citizens who attended community college or worked in pubs.

Frankly, I suspect both pegasus and young socialist are Liberal (or possibly Conservative or even Bloquiste) trolls.

______________________________________________________________________________________ Our kids live together and play together in their communities, let's have them learn together too!

Tommy_Paine

It's all very confusing to me, and we really don't know what went on without hearing from the riding association.  As for trolling, I'm not sure the Liberals or Conservatives would use this venue to launch questions about nominations.   They have bigger media outlets to do that in.

Uncle John

Surely you would attempt to be nominated by the local NDP riding association before getting the Elections Canada paperwork. One of the things you need is a form signed by the Party Leader so you can run under the banner of that Party. Instead of collecting signatures prior to a nomination you should have sold Party Memberships, or at least contacted Jack Layton.

vermonster

Based on what you describe, your candidacy would have been rejected because you didn't follow the proper procedures.

You generally don't collect nomination signatures from the public prior to securing the party nomination. The party nominates people either through riding nomination meetings, or through designation by the party leader. 

In most cases, this nominee is designated long before the election is called. If you approached the party 2 days after the election was called, in all likelihood there was already a nominee in the riding you were seeking to run. The in Quebec CIty you describe approaching was the campaign headquarters for the already nominated candidate, Raymond Cote, focused solely on getting him elected. It had nothing to do with the nomination of candidates.

The filling in of vacant nominations once the election is called is handled by the party headquarters. That's when we end up with situations like Bethier-Maskinonge, where they have to scramble to find a name to put on the ballot. Under those circumstances, the party headquarters would look at names of known party  supporters and approach them about running. If you had previously been in contact with them about your interest in running for Parliament or known to them as a party activist, you might have been in a better position - that's why several of the candidates running were selected from things like university NDP organisatons. (My understanding is that candidate recruitment for Quebec this election was handled out of the party's Montreal office, and was loosely overseen by Thomas Mulcair.)

But the most important thing is to actually buy a membership in your riding association and getting involved there. That is how you find out when nomination meetings are happening, talk to activists and organisers about who is thinking about running in the next election, and help build an organisation on the ground for the party. (This is especially needed in Quebec, where most of our riding associations have historically been very weak). 

Election campaigns don't begin 2 days after the election is formally called, they begin long before when parties select their candidates, lay the groundwork for the campaign, and build the infrastructure necessary to compete for votes. Walking into a party campaign office once the election has already been called and saying "I want to run for Parliament" is simply not how it is done.

Finally, I would suggest that if you were told you were "not qualified" it was not a comment on your professional qualifications, but rather a statement that you did not meet the qualifications for obtaining the nomination - because you didn't go through the procedures to obtain a nomination through a riding association or designation from Ottawa prior to collecting signatures, or because there was already a candidate officially selected where you wanted to run. Approaching a local campaign organiser in Quebec city about wanting to run in Montreal wouldn't have helped matters either - there is no reason that person, overwhelmed trying to put together a campaign organisation in the Quebec city region, would know anything about your home riding. 

 

 

ravenj

Pegasus, if your story is true, it was regretable. 

However, I have only heard of people saying "NDP party" if they aren't familiar with the NDP/NPD.  Logic would also necessitate that one confirms whether nomination (or even appointment) has taken place or not, before getting that many signatures.   

I do believe our MP's should be filled with people with different credentials and background.  It's call the House of Commons, not the House of Highly Educated.

pegasus

vermonster wrote:

Based on what you describe, your candidacy would have been rejected because you didn't follow the proper procedures.

You generally don't collect nomination signatures from the public prior to securing the party nomination. The party nominates people either through riding nomination meetings, or through designation by the party leader. 

In most cases, this nominee is designated long before the election is called. If you approached the party 2 days after the election was called, in all likelihood there was already a nominee in the riding you were seeking to run. The in Quebec CIty you describe approaching was the campaign headquarters for the already nominated candidate, Raymond Cote, focused solely on getting him elected. It had nothing to do with the nomination of candidates.

The filling in of vacant nominations once the election is called is handled by the party headquarters. That's when we end up with situations like Bethier-Maskinonge, where they have to scramble to find a name to put on the ballot. Under those circumstances, the party headquarters would look at names of known party  supporters and approach them about running. If you had previously been in contact with them about your interest in running for Parliament or known to them as a party activist, you might have been in a better position - that's why several of the candidates running were selected from things like university NDP organisatons. (My understanding is that candidate recruitment for Quebec this election was handled out of the party's Montreal office, and was loosely overseen by Thomas Mulcair.)

But the most important thing is to actually buy a membership in your riding association and getting involved there. That is how you find out when nomination meetings are happening, talk to activists and organisers about who is thinking about running in the next election, and help build an organisation on the ground for the party. (This is especially needed in Quebec, where most of our riding associations have historically been very weak). 

Election campaigns don't begin 2 days after the election is formally called, they begin long before when parties select their candidates, lay the groundwork for the campaign, and build the infrastructure necessary to compete for votes. Walking into a party campaign office once the election has already been called and saying "I want to run for Parliament" is simply not how it is done.

Finally, I would suggest that if you were told you were "not qualified" it was not a comment on your professional qualifications, but rather a statement that you did not meet the qualifications for obtaining the nomination - because you didn't go through the procedures to obtain a nomination through a riding association or designation from Ottawa prior to collecting signatures, or because there was already a candidate officially selected where you wanted to run. Approaching a local campaign organiser in Quebec city about wanting to run in Montreal wouldn't have helped matters either - there is no reason that person, overwhelmed trying to put together a campaign organisation in the Quebec city region, would know anything about your home riding. 

 

 

Thank you. This was the best response I have heard :) It makes me feel better as to why I could not run. I obviously went about this the wrong way, and I apologise if I cased anyone to get angry on this thread. It wasn't my intention. I was just looking for the type of answer that was posted above.

I assume that holding a membership is not enough to gain candidacy in the NDP, so I will do as you suggest. Now with the NDP being as large as it is, here in Quebec, finding the association should not be too difficult. How much is a membership in a riding association? I don't earn very much money amd I have a large student loan still to pay off. But I am more than willing to work. I have already given my name to the local MP, Richard Cote. I'm just waiting to hear back so I can get started.

I really would like the opportunity to do this 4 years from now.

MegB

pegasus wrote:

It appears so. Its amazing that if there was a natural disaster or a war that were to break out within the next 4 years in Canada, that a barmaid and a teenager would be given all the protection this country has to offer, while we would all be left to die.

Welcome to babble Pegasus.  As a new member, you should know that referring to the new MP for Berthier--Maskinongé as a "barmaid" is sexist and classist and, as such, violates the babble policy you agreed to follow when you became a member.

 

MegB

youngsocialist wrote:

Same thing happened to a former professor.. Maybe they're looking for people who've graduated from community college and worked as an assistant manager at a pub..

That incredibly classist statement belies your user name.  How exactly do you explain that?

pegasus

Rebecca West wrote:

pegasus wrote:

It appears so. Its amazing that if there was a natural disaster or a war that were to break out within the next 4 years in Canada, that a barmaid and a teenager would be given all the protection this country has to offer, while we would all be left to die.

Welcome to babble Pegasus.  As a new member, you should know that referring to the new MP for Berthier--Maskinongé as a "barmaid" is sexist and classist and, as such, violates the babble policy you agreed to follow when you became a member.

 

Barmaid is sexist? How so? Very well then. I shall change it to barperson.

pegasus

It appears so. Its amazing that if there was a natural disaster or a war that were to break out within the next 4 years in Canada, that a barperson and a teenager would be given all the protection this country has to offer, while we would all be left to die.

SRB

pegasus wrote:

Barmaid is sexist? How so? Very well then. I shall change it to barperson.

I getting rather tired of this term.  There was a story in the Ottawa Citizen today purporting to defend Ms. Brousseau and the reporter, Egan, used the same term to describe Ms. Brousseau, along with calling her a waitress. 

This is erroneous, since it's well known both from her bio on the party website and from other media stories that she was more than a person who simply worked in a bar (not that there is anything wrong with that, at all).  Ms. Brousseau was the assistant manager or co-manager of the pub in which she worked.  People who are wilfully using that term despite the fact that her real job has been widely reported are either careless, uninformed or being deliberately insulting.

 

Slumberjack

pegasus wrote:
I am not a troll and I have been an NDP party.......I have tried writing to both the NDP party as well...

You'll have to pardon people for being a little suspicious in regard to your stated qualifications and intentions.  You keep repeating New Democratic Party Party.

Papal Bull

To defend Pegasus:

 

I have been associated with NDP parties and have gone to an NDP party or two. I know that I am using a different meaning of 'party'...but my point stands.

MegB

pegasus wrote:

Rebecca West wrote:

pegasus wrote:

It appears so. Its amazing that if there was a natural disaster or a war that were to break out within the next 4 years in Canada, that a barmaid and a teenager would be given all the protection this country has to offer, while we would all be left to die.

Welcome to babble Pegasus.  As a new member, you should know that referring to the new MP for Berthier--Maskinongé as a "barmaid" is sexist and classist and, as such, violates the babble policy you agreed to follow when you became a member.

 

Barmaid is sexist? How so? Very well then. I shall change it to barperson.

You're missing the point.  Demeaning her former profession is classist.  Focusing on a woman, whose qualifications are equal to many other male rookie NDP MPs is sexist.  If you cannot understand this, then I strongly suspect that your long-standing NDP membership is a sham, and that your presence here has an agenda outside the purposes of babble.

pegasus

Slumberjack wrote:

pegasus wrote:
I am not a troll and I have been an NDP party.......I have tried writing to both the NDP party as well...

You'll have to pardon people for being a little suspicious in regard to your stated qualifications and intentions.  You keep repeating New Democratic Party Party.

I make an error in terminology. This for some odd reason turns me into a troll or Liberal, or Conservative or BQ or Rhino party member Foot in mouth

Uncle John

Pegasus, if you want to get on the ballot for the next election, you should start working now.

1. Pick a riding with no NDP member and GO AND LIVE THERE. Otherwise you have to try and knock off a sitting NDP MP, which will put the whole local party against your interloping ways.

2. Join the NDP and find out all you can about the local riding association, and get involved with it.

3. Knock on EVERY DOOR in the riding and introduce yourself, while selling NDP memberships. You have time to do this. Should be about 40,000 doors. The more memberships you sell, the more the Party will like you.

4. Take on some local causes in that riding, advocate for people, and get known as a local activist. Try to get some media coverage, even if it is in the local free newspaper. Get some volunteers to help you with your local causes and nomination.

4. When the nomination meeting comes, make sure your new friends show up and vote for you.

5. Once Jack Layton signs your nomination papers, you are good to go!

Uncle John

double post sorry

pegasus

Uncle John wrote:

Pegasus, if you want to get on the ballot for the next election, you should start working now.

1. Pick a riding with no NDP member and GO AND LIVE THERE. Otherwise you have to try and knock off a sitting NDP MP, which will put the whole local party against your interloping ways.

You don't have to live in the riding you run in.

Uncle John wrote:

2. Join the NDP and find out all you can about the local riding association, and get involved with it.

Most areas in Quebec are already taken. I'm planning on moving to the Ottawa/Gatineau area within the next couple of years however.

Uncle John wrote:

3. Knock on EVERY DOOR in the riding and introduce yourself, while selling NDP memberships. You have time to do this. Should be about 40,000 doors. The more memberships you sell, the more the Party will like you.

This is not a problem :)

Uncle John wrote:

4. Take on some local causes in that riding, advocate for people, and get known as a local activist. Try to get some media coverage, even if it is in the local free newspaper. Get some volunteers to help you with your local causes and nomination.

Again, not hard to do.

Uncle John wrote:

4. When the nomination meeting comes, make sure your new friends show up and vote for you.

I really don't have any friends in Ottawa, but my sister is there.

Uncle John wrote:

5. Once Jack Layton signs your nomination papers, you are good to go!

But this is all assuming I wish to win. I don't care if I win or lose. I just want to go through the experience.

pegasus

.

pegasus

Who am I kidding? I have absolutely no chance,  :(

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