Liberals and Conservatives defeat motion for a public inquiry to investigate Boeing 737 Max crashes

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jerrym
Liberals and Conservatives defeat motion for a public inquiry to investigate Boeing 737 Max crashes

Working together Liberal and Conseravatives on a committee voted to defeat a motion by New Democratic MP Taylor Bachrach for a public inquiry into the Boeing Max 737 crashes that killed 19 Canadians despite being "unable to get a clear answer from Transport Canada officials about key aspects of Canada’s decision to allow the plane to fly after the first disaster" and serious questions remaining "about the safety of the 737 Max – which have been unanswered at the committee – even as the federal government appears poised to clear a revamped version of the plane to fly in January".

This is another example of the deadly consequences of allowing industries to self-regulate themselves. In this case the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) "had outsourced much of its oversight of the new plane to Boeing’s own engineers" and Transport Canada rubber stamped its approval. 

A plea for a public inquiry from relatives of the Canadians who died in last year’s Boeing 737 Max crash was blocked by Liberal and Conservative MPs on Thursday, dealing a heartbreaking blow to the families’ attempts to get answers about the tragedy and Canada’s oversight of the plane. “I was almost yelling at my monitor,” said a frustrated Chris Moore, who tuned into the online federal Transport committee hearing from his home in Toronto and watched as the motion was defeated by five Liberals and four Conservatives, who said a public inquiry either wasn’t necessary, or was premature. Mr. Moore, whose 24-year-old daughter Danielle died when the faulty plane crashed in Ethiopia, has been seeking answers as to why Canadian regulators deemed the 737 Max to be safe, particularly after it crashed once in 2018 in Indonesia, raising concerns about a fatal design flaw.

Had Canada stepped in then, rather than endorsing the plane along with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), he argues it could have saved the lives of 157 people, including 18 Canadians who died in 2019 when the 737 Max plummeted to the ground in Ethiopia. ...

Mr. Moore and the other Canadian families affected have been calling for an inquiry for the past year, particularly after Transport Minister Marc Garneau waited nearly a year to grant them a meeting to discuss the disaster. However, when New Democratic MP Taylor Bachrach proposed the motion Thursday at the federal Transport committee, which has been examining Canada’s approval of the 737 Max, several MPs criticized it.

Though the committee failed to force Boeing to testify – the company ignored repeated requests – and several key questions about Canada’s scrutiny of the plane have gone unanswered, Liberal Helena Jaczek said, “I really feel that we have enough information. I really just feel that a public inquiry really couldn’t add any particular value.” She was backed by Liberal Churence Rogers. ...

The motion was defeated 9-2. Liberals Fayçal El-Khoury and Maninder Sidhu also voted against a public inquiry, as did Conservatives Michael Kram, Gerald Soroka and Doug Shipley. Only Mr. Bachrach and Bloc Québécois MP Xavier Barsalou-Duval supported a public inquiry.

With the motion defeated, serious questions remain about the safety of the 737 Max – which have been unanswered at the committee – even as the federal government appears poised to clear a revamped version of the plane to fly in January. Gilles Primeau, an expert in flight control systems, testified before the committee this week that he personally would not fly on the 737 Max because he believes some of the flaws in its design have not been corrected and it is not safe. ...

The MPs on the committee have been unable to get a clear answer from Transport Canada officials about key aspects of Canada’s decision to allow the plane to fly after the first disaster. When the first 737 Max crashed in late 2018, killing 189 people in Indonesia, evidence suggested software designed to stabilize the plane, known as the manoeuvring characteristics augmentation system, or MCAS, could instead force it into a deadly nosedive if a sensor failed. After that disaster, the FAA conducted a risk analysis that determined further crashes could happen, and provided the preliminary results of that study to Canada. However, Transport Canada has never disclosed exactly what was in that preliminary analysis and why Canadian officials, rather than raise alarms or ground the plane, only obtained the full report after the second crash.

Despite Ms. Jaczek’s assertion that the committee has “enough information” from the hearings it has conducted, Mr. Moore said he has sent several pages of questions to Transport Canada about how it deemed the plane safe. Those questions have not been answered in the committee process. ...

Several probes, including one conducted jointly last year by regulators from around the world, concluded that the FAA had outsourced much of its oversight of the new plane to Boeing’s own engineers, who withheld information about how it was designed. Among the data it withheld were details about how the MCAS operated. However, those probes did not scrutinize Transport Canada’s own decisions to approve the 737 Max, and how much Canada relied upon information supplied by the FAA.

The 737 Max has been grounded since March, 2019 while Boeing worked to correct the flawed MCAS software. Last week, the FAA gave the go-ahead for the redesigned plane to return to service. Mr. Robinson said Transport Canada’s validation decision on the plane was “imminent” and would likely come in January.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-mps-reject-pleas-for-a-pu...

jerrym

Canadian relatives of those killed in the Boeing 737 Max airline crashes are concerned that these planes are still unsafe. 

Families of Canadians killed in the Boeing 737 Max crash say the plane remains unsafe and should stay grounded, despite being cleared for takeoff by regulators in the United States.

Paul Njoroge, whose wife, three children and mother-in-law died in the March 2019 crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, told the House of Commons transport committee Tuesday the aircraft is still “unstable.”

He and Chris Moore, whose daughter was among the 18 Canadian citizens who lost their lives, are calling for an independent inquiry into Transport Canada’s validation of Boeing’s best-selling airplane.

Moore says Canadians deserve to know why Transport Canada did not take action even after issuing a letter of concern before the crash about the Max plane’s anti-stall system, which safety regulators have said U.S. authorities failed to properly review.

Transport Canada said last week its recertification standards for the Max 8 diverge from those of U.S. regulators, including added procedures on the flight deck and differences in pilot training.

The Max planes have been grounded since March 2019 after the deadly crashes of a Lion Air flight near Jakarta in October 2018 and the Ethiopian Airlines flight less than five months later.

https://www.nelsonstar.com/news/families-of-737-max-crash-victims-say-pl...

jerrym

While the Liberals and Conservatives blocked any investigation into why the Boeing 737 Max was approved in Canada by Transport Canada, the House of Representatives in the United States was not afraid to investigate the airplane and its crashes, thereby finding "damning evidence of failures at both Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration that "played instrumental and causative roles" in two fatal crashes that killed a total of 346 people."

A sweeping congressional inquiry into the development and certification of Boeing's troubled 737 Max airplane finds damning evidence of failures at both Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration that "played instrumental and causative roles" in two fatal crashes that killed a total of 346 people.

The House Transportation Committee released an investigative report produced by Democratic staff on Wednesday morning. It documents what it says is "a disturbing pattern of technical miscalculations and troubling management misjudgments" by Boeing, combined with "numerous oversight lapses and accountability gaps by the FAA."

Lion Air Flight 610 crashed in October 2018, and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed in March 2019, both Boeing 737 Max aircraft.

"The Max crashes were not the result of a singular failure, technical mistake, or mismanaged event," the committee report says. Instead, "they were the horrific culmination of a series of faulty technical assumptions by Boeing's engineers, a lack of transparency on the part of Boeing's management, and grossly insufficient oversight by the FAA."

The report ... appears to be the most comprehensive in analyzing both Boeing's and the FAA's roles in developing and certifying an ultimately flawed commercial passenger jet.

https://www.npr.org/2020/09/16/913426448/congressional-inquiry-faults-bo...