NDP Leadership 40

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KenS

Worth noting that Sagnash's missteps, and the potentialy problematic reputation he has acquired is only among political junkies. It does mean they'll be waiting for him in media interviews- but he can change how he is read. Even after I think flubbing the Canadian Press ed board interview badly, I thought he recovered quite well in the following days.

In oter words, hes got planty of time to bottle up that tendency to respond like a political pundit, sticking to who Romeo is, what matters, and his vison for Canada.

ottawaobserver

NDP Leadership Hopeful Dewar shaped by Challenge of Overcoming Dyslexia, by Joan Bryden, Canadian Press

Here is a really fantastic piece about our local MP, Paul Dewar, and his struggles with dyslexia over the years. He won awards for his teaching with special needs kids. Maybe it will help others to learn more about him, the way we know him here in Ottawa. This is a really special man.

Newfoundlander_...

ottawaobserver wrote:

NDP Leadership Hopeful Dewar shaped by Challenge of Overcoming Dyslexia, by Joan Bryden, Canadian Press

Here is a really fantastic piece about our local MP, Paul Dewar, and his struggles with dyslexia over the years. He won awards for his teaching with special needs kids. Maybe it will help others to learn more about him, the way we know him here in Ottawa. This is a really special man.

Excellent article!

vaudree

I thought that the Bloc was debating whether to fold and pour their resources into the PQ or continue to exist. I get the feeling, from what Saganash says, that the Bloc have decided that they can make the NDP wear all the stuff that they could not stop the Tories from doing - and claim that, if there had been more Bloc then Harper would not have got his bills through - and probably in helping constituents too. There were a few instances of defeated candidates trashing their files meaning that if a defeated Bloc was helping someone with immigration, then the NDP candidate who defeated them had to start from scratch in helping the person. Pierre-Luc Dusseault was complaining about that a while back (twitter):

Les dossiers vides: «Il punit les gens plus que les nouveaux membres [...]» - @ GuyCaronNPD http://t.co/3Hxow4K via @ cyberpresseJul 24, 2011 3:04 pm
Empty folders: "It punishes people more than the new members [...]» - @ GuyCaronNPD http://t.co/3Hxow4K via @ cyberpresseJul 24, 2011 3:04 pm

http://www.cyberpresse.ca/actualites/quebec-canada/politique-canadienne/...

I think that Saganash wants to put a nail in their coffin so that they don't rise from the dead. If the Bloc don't manage to resurrect their party the next election, they are pretty much gone. Saganash says: "Obviously, we must re-elect the people we have in Parliament now. We cannot step backward." - there is already people not just talking down the new MPs but spreading rumours that they are not standing up for the things that they are standing up for and misrepresenting the NDP platform.

The line that sticks out to me in the Saganash article is (in reference to soccer moms: "The NDP can offer that. We can refrain from paternalism, respecting people's ability to make their own decisions."

Paternalism means something a bit different to middle class soccer moms than it does to a person begging Indian Affairs for funding for a new school. Saganash says that he is a Social Democrat - but the word "paternalism" when white middle class people complain about it in regards to their own lives means "nanny state" and higher taxes - and a call for Ron Paul type Libertarianism.

algomafalcon wrote:
I did wonder if Capstick might be a little "Ottawa centric" in his high placement of Dewar (who I think is kind of a wimp, but at least is not as dull as Nash). But I'm still open minded about who might be best suited for the job, if any.

That may be the reason behind the Dyslexia article - in that the article seemed to dispel the notion that Dewar was/is a wuss. As far as an inspirational narrative, I think that Residential school survivor still trumps Dyslexic (which seems to be a catch phrase for a few distinct learning differences).

 

Gaian

Thank you for that picture of the Quebec scene. It really did have to be more complicated - the struggle between social democratic forces, federal and nationalist - than the bland stories suggested,up to this point. Saganash is confronting it and explaining the real situation of the NPD in Quebec to the world. I must pay more attention to his concerns.

KenS

Dewar in Nova Scotia

and stayed with Howard Epstein- which would be interesting if that is who Howard intends to support. Could just be a comreadely offer of place to stay, possibly arranged by Megan Leslie who is facilitating candidates getting here and getting around.

janfromthebruce

sadly, and I speak from knowledge and experience, overcoming Dyslexia is about developing coping strategies that are effective but it doesn't go away. Dyslexia also creates lots of problems with learning a 2nd language. So bilingualism will be a real hard hill to climb. Know this one too!

 

Newfoundlander_Labradorian wrote:

ottawaobserver wrote:

NDP Leadership Hopeful Dewar shaped by Challenge of Overcoming Dyslexia, by Joan Bryden, Canadian Press

Here is a really fantastic piece about our local MP, Paul Dewar, and his struggles with dyslexia over the years. He won awards for his teaching with special needs kids. Maybe it will help others to learn more about him, the way we know him here in Ottawa. This is a really special man.

Excellent article!

______________________________________________________________________________________ Our kids live together and play together in their communities, let's have them learn together too!

nicky

I would like to continue the "electability" discussion from the thread about "ranking." It is may be a better fit here.

As I argued there I think electability is much more important in this race than ideology, particularly with minimal policy differences between the candidates.

I would be interested in what you all might say about the various candidates' electoral appeal.

I make no secret that I think Mulcair is our best electoral bet.

I must disagree with a couple things Northern Shoveler has said. He says his "patrician background" will limit his electoral appeal. I don't know where you get this. He is the son of an electrician, I believe, and was raised in a working class familiy of ten children. NS says his polished manner will limit his appeal to working people. I don't see that at all. Mulcair is by far the best counterpuncher in the field. He is no effete Dion or Ignatieff. The guy in the sports bar will love his style.

NS also says we will not be able to gague electoral appeal until the leader is in the field at the next electin. Surely we can"t afford to wait that long. We can kick th tires and drive the various vehicles around the block long before then.

So how can we judge electoral appeal?

Our individual sense of how the candidates connect. The debates are important but because the format is so limited and the field so wide we may have limited scope to gague their strengths and weaknesses. So look at longer interviews. Meet the candidates face to face.

Polls. This race is bound to be widely polled. There have been a couple fragmentary and dated polls already which show Mulcair in a clear lead but it is said they simply reflect name recognition. I think the only poll of any real significance so far was the Leger poll which showed Mulcair adding 10% to the party's election percent in Quebec and other candidates shedding 10%.

We also have the candidates' own electoral records. What have they achieved at the polls? Was it on their own merits or were they simply the beneificiaries of the Crush?

1. Topp and Singh. No electoral track record at all.

2. Saganash. One run, one win. But how much was this the Crush?

3. Nash. Three runs, two wins, one loss. In a riding never carried by the party before federally but in one that they usually won in provincial and municipal elections. Her second win was  also part of the Crush.

4. Cullen four wins. Gained a riding from the Conservatives (albeit one that had traditionally voted NDP) and has steadily built his margin

5. Dewar. Entered Parliament by successfully defending a seat with an NDP incumbent. Reeleted by increasing margins.

6. Ashton. Initially lost one of our safest seats, then won it twice handily.

7. Chisholm. Truly performed electoral miracles in Nova Scotia, lifting the party from the fringe to the official opposition. Gaining a federal seat from a well entrenched incumbent (albeit a seat  the party had won before)

8. Mulcair. Three landslide wins for the Quebec National Assembly. A very convincing win in the 2007 Outremont by-election in a seat where the party had never come close. Then a narrower win in the general election, becoming the only New Democrat to ever to win in Quebec in a general election. And then an essential contributor to the Orange Crush. Never lost an election.

vermonster

nicky wrote:

 

6. Ashton. Initially lost one of our safest seats, then won it twice handily.

The comment that Ashton "initially lost one of our safest seats" deserves at least a footnote -- most candidates for Parliament don't face an incumbent formerly of their own party running as an independent after defeating that incumbent in the nomination contest. The 17% of the vote that Desjarlais won as an independent is what cost the seat in 2006, not a weak campaign by the then 23 year old Ashton.

 

MegB

Closing for length.

Stockholm

nicky wrote:

3. Nash. Three runs, two wins, one loss. In a riding never carried by the party before federally but in one that they usually won in provincial and municipal elections. Her second win was  also part of the Crush.

The has actually run four times - lost in 2004, won in 2006, lost in 2008 and won in 2011.

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