NDP Leadership -round 8

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Erik Redburn
NDP Leadership -round 8

Continued from here:  NDP Leadership Part 7

 

 

Issues Pages: 
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Erik Redburn

Ok, since this is bound to continue getting attention we might as well continue.  

I just want to add that I agree wholeheartedly with Thomas Mulcair that it should be put off till the spring.  Since the membership is skewed so far away from Quebec still, despite the massive electoral gains there, it's not only fair but necessary if the party is to even hold its position as Official Opposition.  The party can't afford losing a high profile member like him either, even if I myself probably won't be supporting his probable leadership bid.

ottawaobserver

David Miller is out, both from the leadership and the Toronto-Danforth by-election.

PlainsExplorer

Just wanted to chime in on the French language issue and its necessity as an attribute for the NDP leader.  While I get why the leader needs to speak French, most of the people I grew up with are working-class people who were raised and educated in Saskatchewan before French immersion was much of an option.  Under those circumstances, the possiblity of traveling to a French-speaking region to properly practice a second language seemed like traveling to the moon.  Neither of my Dad's parents were even native English speakers.

Now granted, most of those people didn't lead the kind of lives which qualified them for high political office but it's kind of a kick in the teeth that its not even much of a dream.

I tend to believe in a brand of socialism that fights that kind of alienation and privledge.

 

ottawaobserver
Erik Redburn

Very good, let's divide the centre-right 'moderate' vote somemore.

Erik Redburn

PlainsExplorer wrote:

Just wanted to chime in on the French language issue and its necessity as an attribute for the NDP leader.  While I get why the leader needs to speak French, most of the people I grew up with are working-class people who were raised and educated in Saskatchewan before French immersion was much of an option.  Under those circumstances, the possiblity of traveling to a French-speaking region to properly practice a second language seemed like traveling to the moon.  Neither of my Dad's parents were even native English speakers.

Now granted, most of those people didn't lead the kind of lives which qualified them for high political office but it's kind of a kick in the teeth that its not even much of a dream.

I tend to believe in a brand of socialism that fights that kind of alienation and privledge.

 

 

Ya, fluent French (or English) shouldn't by itself be a prerequiste and at one time it wasn't (just look a Chretien...) but I'm afriad that's one political reality the party can't ignore anymore.

Hunky_Monkey

Erik Redburn wrote:

Very good, let's divide the centre-right 'moderate' vote somemore.

Could you list Paul Dewar's centre-right positions?

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I think bilingualism is now ( or should be) an absolute requirement for federal leaders in every party - by the way, how is E. May's French? I have no idea.

Erik Redburn

Boom Boom wrote:

I think bilingualism is now ( or should be) an absolute requirement for federal leaders in every party - by the way, how is E. May's French? I have no idea.

 

She has a bit I think but needs more work.  I might consider supporting her too, next election, if present trends continue unabaited.

vermonster

Boom Boom wrote:

I think bilingualism is now ( or should be) an absolute requirement for federal leaders in every party - by the way, how is E. May's French? I have no idea.

 

May's French is not strong - she manages, but is pretty weak. She clearly struggled in the French langauge leaders' debate last time in 2008 - she had trouble understanding some questions, spoke in very simple highly accented language that showed a limited vocabulary and grammar.  I've only heard a few interviews since that debate, and my impression is that she hasn't improved much (if any).  She speaks enough French to present her ideas and engage with people, and she deserves credit for trying, but she is far from fluent or comfortable communicating in the language. 

Northern Shoveler Northern Shoveler's picture

Boom Boom wrote:

I think bilingualism is now ( or should be) an absolute requirement for federal leaders in every party - by the way, how is E. May's French? I have no idea.

If the two languages are French and English in BC that means that over 90% of the population is ineligible to lead a Canadian political party.  That sounds very democratic and fair.  On the other hand a candidate that speaks both English and Mandarin fluently is sought after by all political parties out here.  That is because those are the major languages in this part of the country.  

French is the language at home for less than 1% of BC residents so anyone growing up here has to have the resources to acquire fluency in a language that is not spoken in the region. It certainly narrows the field to well educated people with substantial economic resources or people who have moved to BC from central Canada.  But then I guess that is the kind of politician we need in a liberal democracy.

ottawaobserver

Your next premier is fluently bilingual, on the other hand.

Northern Shoveler Northern Shoveler's picture

He is indeed.  What does that have to do with the fact he is a rarity? 

NS: the sky is blue.

OO: No look there is a cloud and its not blue.  

Lou Arab Lou Arab's picture

Looks like Robert Chisholm is close to entering the race:

Quote:
I need to consider: if I am here to serve, and if my leadership skills and depth of experience can be used to bring even greater numbers of people together, moving our communities forward, and making our country better, then maybe asking the party for that opportunity as their leader is what I must do.

Erik Redburn

Anyone have any info to impart on Chisholm, track record, background, beliefs, issues of special interest -or where it can be easily found?   Another one I know little about.

Gaian

Northern Shoveler wrote:

He is indeed.  What does that have to do with the fact he is a rarity? 

NS: the sky is blue.

OO: No look there is a cloud and its not blue.  

The red herrings you are tossing out go very well with your blue sky background.

Aristotleded24

Northern Shoveler wrote:
If the two languages are French and English in BC that means that over 90% of the population is ineligible to lead a Canadian political party.  That sounds very democratic and fair.  On the other hand a candidate that speaks both English and Mandarin fluently is sought after by all political parties out here.  That is because those are the major languages in this part of the country.  

French is the language at home for less than 1% of BC residents so anyone growing up here has to have the resources to acquire fluency in a language that is not spoken in the region. It certainly narrows the field to well educated people with substantial economic resources or people who have moved to BC from central Canada.  But then I guess that is the kind of politician we need in a liberal democracy.

First of all, I suggested in one of the other leadership threads that maybe it's time to consider fluency in other languages, on top of being bilingual to be essential, so I can certainly see where this is coming from. Having said that, Canada still is officially English-French bilingual, and any national party must recognize that if it is to go very far. And frankly, I think once elected a Member of Parliament you'd have access to whatever resources you need in order to improve your second language skills. Heck, I'm sure that the new members of the Quebec Caucus would be happy to assist their fellow MPs learn a second language. And of course, there are several western NDP MPs who speak French, including Nathan Cullen, Peter Julian, Denise Savoie, Linda Duncan, and Nikki Ashton.

I agree it's a challenge, especially considering how little French is spoken in Western Canada, but it is a challenge that can be overcome.

Hunky_Monkey

Erik Redburn wrote:

Hunky_Monkey wrote:
Erik Redburn wrote:

Very good, let's divide the centre-right 'moderate' vote somemore.

Could you list Paul Dewar's centre-right positions?

 

For starters?  His consistent stands supporting NATO 'intervention', most recently against Muammar Qaddafi, a non-threat on any international scale and rather benign dictator by average world standards.  (sorry if my positions confuse some people here, I'm really not shifting one inch on that one)   

 

For starters, the caucus supported that and Dewar speaks on foreign affairs issues in his critic role.

So... that's your basis for Dewar being "centre-right"?

Getting a little tired of certain caucus members being labeled "right-wing" with little to back it up.

meades meades's picture

Quote:
 If the two languages are French and English in BC that means that over 90% of the population is ineligible to lead a Canadian political party 

Oh, I suspect it's a much larger percentage than that, irrespective of language ability. Let's be realistic: There have been only 20-some Prime Ministers in our history, 40-some Parliaments, and at each of these points only 2-3 contenders for the PM's position. Lack of French-language skills, I feel, is the least offensive of all the barriers preventing people from being engaged in political leadership roles.

Also, we're not talking about just British Columbia. That statistic proves that bilingualism shouldn't be required to lead the BCNDP - I think we already knew that. We're talking about Canada, where 25% of our population is Francophone. 

The class barriers to participation in politics are certainly concerning, but they also have an interesting relationship to language. In most of the rest of the world, bi-(if not multi-)lingualism is the norm, *especially* among working-class, nomadic, or agrarian peoples. In Canada (and other former British colonies), English hegemony is so pervasive that multilingualism is actively discouraged. While nominally, almost everyone has access to French education if they want it, the reality is middle class parents are more likely to enrol their children in immersion (mostly with the idea of their children having the opportunity to access jobs in the federal civil service) because the political situation in Canada has necessitated that some protections be in place to protect the rights and services of the country's largest linguistic under-class (PS - Canada does a pretty poor job at this). Anyhow, if you've made it in the Canadian political scene, you've overcome the major barriers that the average English-speaking Canadians experience in accessing the political system, and after however many years serving as an MP or working in a middle-class, bilingual environment, I tend to think your excuses for not learning French have run out.

That said, I recognize fluency takes a great deal of time, and I think great kudos is owed to people like Libby Davies and Robert Chisolm who *are* learning French even though it's not a major language where they are from (I have less sympathy for Paul Dewar, given he's from Ottawa, and his mother was Mayor of a bilingual city). 

Erik Redburn

Hunky_Monkey wrote:
Erik Redburn wrote:

Very good, let's divide the centre-right 'moderate' vote somemore.

Could you list Paul Dewar's centre-right positions?

 

For starters?  His consistent stands supporting NATO 'intervention', most recently against Muammar Qaddafi, a non-threat on any international scale and rather generous dictator by average world standards.  (sorry if my positions confuse some people here, I'm really not shifting one inch on that one)   

 

ETA:  Heres more on him, outlining his proposed platforms:  http://www.pauldewar.ca/en/issues.html

Most of its ok, some of its important, some rather trivial, but little that goes beyond what the federal NDP platform already holds and some notable absences (nothing about NAFTA, native land claims, little about poverty or criminal justice problems or links between global warming and oil sands development, etc)  along some notable neo-liberalisms (re tax breaks stimulating job creation).

Idealistic Prag... Idealistic Pragmatist's picture

Aristotleded24 wrote:
And of course, there are several western NDP MPs who speak French, including Nathan Cullen, Peter Julian, Denise Savoie, Linda Duncan, and Nikki Ashton.

Linda is learning French, but she can't be said to speak it yet.

Erik Redburn

Hunky_Monkey wrote:
Erik Redburn wrote:

Hunky_Monkey wrote:
Erik Redburn wrote:

Very good, let's divide the centre-right 'moderate' vote somemore.

Could you list Paul Dewar's centre-right positions?

 

For starters?  His consistent stands supporting NATO 'intervention', most recently against Muammar Qaddafi, a non-threat on any international scale and rather benign dictator by average world standards.  (sorry if my positions confuse some people here, I'm really not shifting one inch on that one)   

 

For starters, the caucus supported that and Dewar speaks on foreign affairs issues in his critic role. So... that's your basis for Dewar being "centre-right"? Getting a little tired of certain caucus members being labeled "right-wing" with little to back it up.

 

I don't believe the entire caucus was as solidly behind this stupid war as Dewar was, but as I wrote in another thread it looks like the vote was whipped from upstairs.  Dewar in his official role in foreign affairs has greater responsibility (and access to information)  than others, and he has been quite consistent in his support for foreign military adventures.  It was one of Layton's weak spots too, if we can be compltely honest now.  If yopu don't think its important then I'm afriad we have to part ways on whatconstitues centre-left and centre-right.

Re the rest, I posted more on him in my previous.  Take another look.

Erik Redburn

Mm, but Nikki Ashton is another who might be worth a closer look too, for the progressive-left wing.  Just hope not Too too many on the left side run, and those that do come together in mutual support when called for. 

Howard

Power & Politics is annoying. Most (all?) of the guests sound like they don't know what they are talking about.

Northern Shoveler Northern Shoveler's picture

Seems to me it is a matter of continuing racism in Canada. I know it is hard to understand in Central Canada but Chinese as a language has been more prevalent in BC than French, since BC joined Confederation.  BC invented the residential school and pushed for Asian exclusion laws so in 1871 there was no call by our racist leadership for official recognition of any other language except English.  When BC joined its leaders were actively involved in genocide against the FN's and overt brutal racism against Asians. That is why Chinese or FN's languages have no official status. At least we now let people of Chinese ethnicity vote in our elections. That only took about 75 years after BC joined Confederation. 

French has always been irrelevant in this province and until Trudeau the language was never seen anywhere. There are many historically disadvantaged groups and nations in this country and it seems to me they need to try to understand each other and that is a two way street.  I am hoping that some of the Quebec MP's do like Jack and others in the party and make a sincere effort to learn Mandarin or even Cantonese.  Then they will be able to come to BC and interact with the largest minority community in the province.  I might be mistaken but given their backgrounds  I presume that at least one of two of them have some knowledge of Mandarin.  Maybe that should be one of the factors that determines which Quebec MP is suitable to lead the party.  Anyone not willing to commit to learning Chinese should not even consider leading a national party. They don't have to be fluent but at least as able to speak the language as well Jack did.

I agree that a national politician should learn both official languages. I disagree with the idea that they have to be fluently bilingual to even apply for the job.  Fluently bilingual is a very high standard.  Jack grew up in Montreal and he was a long way from being fluently bilingual when he not only won the leadership but started to build the party in Quebec.  He travelled with a tutor and the people of Quebec did not reject his sincere overtures just because his french was shitty. Have the people of Quebec changed since the time when they accepted a Toronto politician with limited french as he began to build the base that won all those seats?  I personally think the majority of the population of Quebec is less concerned with fluency and more concerned with sincerity.

Thx Gaian for being so enthralled by every thing I write.  I love flattery.  Do you ever comment on the substance of anything?

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

[press release]

NDP Socialist Caucus to Decide on Candidate for NDP Federal Leader

The NDP Socialist Caucus, the cross-country, organized left wing of the labour-based New Democratic Party, will host a conference on November 26, to be held in Toronto, to decide its position on the federal NDP leadership race.

The Socialist Caucus, which played a significant role in preventing removal of the term "socialist" from the party constitution at the June 2011 federal convention in Vancouver, is concerned that some putative candidates for leader advocate a merger of the NDP with the big business-backed Liberal Party, and seek to steer the NDP on a policy course further to the right.

The SC also opposes suggestions that the party weaken its ties to the union movement, and/or eliminate the weighted vote of affiliated union members in the election of the next NDP federal leader. Socialists seek to increase and strengthen the labour character of the party, and to win it to the fight for a Workers' Agenda, counter to the corporate agenda and to prevailing anti-worker 'austerity' measures that dominate our society.

At the November 26 SC conference, members may decide to run a candidate for Leader, or to support one of the candidates then already running for the post.

SC policy resolutions, publications, forums, and candidates for party executive positions at the federal and Ontario NDP conventions in 2012 will also be on the agenda at the November 26 SC gathering.

For more information, please contact: Barry Weisleder, chairperson, NDP Socialist Caucus

telephone: 416 - 535-8779 e-mail: [email protected]

web site: www.ndpsocialists.ca

knownothing knownothing's picture

M. Spector wrote:

[press release]

NDP Socialist Caucus to Decide on Candidate for NDP Federal Leader

The NDP Socialist Caucus, the cross-country, organized left wing of the labour-based New Democratic Party, will host a conference on November 26, to be held in Toronto, to decide its position on the federal NDP leadership race.

The Socialist Caucus, which played a significant role in preventing removal of the term "socialist" from the party constitution at the June 2011 federal convention in Vancouver, is concerned that some putative candidates for leader advocate a merger of the NDP with the big business-backed Liberal Party, and seek to steer the NDP on a policy course further to the right.

The SC also opposes suggestions that the party weaken its ties to the union movement, and/or eliminate the weighted vote of affiliated union members in the election of the next NDP federal leader. Socialists seek to increase and strengthen the labour character of the party, and to win it to the fight for a Workers' Agenda, counter to the corporate agenda and to prevailing anti-worker 'austerity' measures that dominate our society.

At the November 26 SC conference, members may decide to run a candidate for Leader, or to support one of the candidates then already running for the post.

SC policy resolutions, publications, forums, and candidates for party executive positions at the federal and Ontario NDP conventions in 2012 will also be on the agenda at the November 26 SC gathering.

For more information, please contact: Barry Weisleder, chairperson, NDP Socialist Caucus

telephone: 416 - 535-8779 e-mail: [email protected]

web site: www.ndpsocialists.ca

While I support unions in principle I think this is an old school approach and there are many other organized social movements that deserve equal say that make up the NDP electorate.

 

If unions want a bigger say they should encourage more of their members to join the party!

Tom Vouloumanos

 

Pierre Ducasse Ponders NDP Leadership: Once A Future Star, Quebecer Weighs Family, New Job 

 

 

#mce_temp_url#

Policywonk

knownothing wrote:

M. Spector wrote:

[press release]

NDP Socialist Caucus to Decide on Candidate for NDP Federal Leader

The NDP Socialist Caucus, the cross-country, organized left wing of the labour-based New Democratic Party, will host a conference on November 26, to be held in Toronto, to decide its position on the federal NDP leadership race.

The Socialist Caucus, which played a significant role in preventing removal of the term "socialist" from the party constitution at the June 2011 federal convention in Vancouver, is concerned that some putative candidates for leader advocate a merger of the NDP with the big business-backed Liberal Party, and seek to steer the NDP on a policy course further to the right.

The SC also opposes suggestions that the party weaken its ties to the union movement, and/or eliminate the weighted vote of affiliated union members in the election of the next NDP federal leader. Socialists seek to increase and strengthen the labour character of the party, and to win it to the fight for a Workers' Agenda, counter to the corporate agenda and to prevailing anti-worker 'austerity' measures that dominate our society.

At the November 26 SC conference, members may decide to run a candidate for Leader, or to support one of the candidates then already running for the post.

SC policy resolutions, publications, forums, and candidates for party executive positions at the federal and Ontario NDP conventions in 2012 will also be on the agenda at the November 26 SC gathering.

For more information, please contact: Barry Weisleder, chairperson, NDP Socialist Caucus

telephone: 416 - 535-8779 e-mail: [email protected]

web site: www.ndpsocialists.ca

While I support unions in principle I think this is an old school approach and there are many other organized social movements that deserve equal say that make up the NDP electorate.

 

If unions want a bigger say they should encourage more of their members to join the party!

They're a little late on the carve-out (by about 5 years if that's the prevailing interpretation).

meades meades's picture

Quote:
French has always been irrelevant in this province and until Trudeau the language was never seen anywhere.

No one's arguing that. English has also been irrelevant in Lac St. Jean. That doesn't mean a national party leader shouldn't be expected to have a reasonable command of English because it's irrelevant in some places. Also you still largely don't see French anywhere in BC, except on federally owned land and federal government offices. That's the extent of Canada's big evil Bilingualism policy. French-medium and French-immersion schools exist where there is parental demand for such services. 

 

Quote:
There are many historically disadvantaged groups and nations in this country and it seems to me they need to try to understand each other and that is a two way street. 

No one is suggesting otherwise. But let's look at the reality of the NDP leadership: The only MP as far as I know that is bi/multilingual in a set of languages that does not include English and French is, according to these threads, Olivia Chow (and she's even gone on the record as saying her French is better than the media is reporting). Chow has already declined to run, and I think it's safe to assume (both from the heartbreaking ordeal she's been through, as well as her own estimation of her French abilities) that it's not because of her "lack" of French. 

Quote:
 I am hoping that some of the Quebec MP's do like Jack and others in the party and make a sincere effort to learn Mandarin or even Cantonese. Then they will be able to come to BC and interact with the largest minority community in the province.  I might be mistaken but given their backgrounds  I presume that at least one of two of them have some knowledge of Mandarin.  Maybe that should be one of the factors that determines which Quebec MP is suitable to lead the party.  Anyone not willing to commit to learning Chinese should not even consider leading a national party. They don't have to be fluent but at least as able to speak the language as well Jack did.

Jack wasn't fluent in either language. He spoke a few phrases, and as far as I know could have some conversations with his mother in law, but that's the extent. Regardless, you're comparing apples and oranges. Canada is home to around 80 indigenous languages, and over a hundred non-indigenous non-official languages. Expecting fluency from a diverse sample is unrealistic, as I'm sure you'd agree, as the number of speakers are quite small, especially if you compare them to the 60-some per cent that speak English and the 20-some per cent that speak French. If you cluster all Chinese languages together (which you shouldn't, cause they're not mutually intelligible, but that doesn't stop StatsCan) mother tongue speakers make up about 3% of the population. That's to say 1.2% of Canadians speak Cantonese, and 0.5% speak Mandarin (the remainder speak either Hakka, Wu, Yue, Xiang, etc.). Furthermore, these languages are essential for communicating with a substantial group of residents in about 5 federal ridings, as opposed to about 80 federal ridings where French is essential. That doesn't mean that being fluent in Cantonese or Mandarin isn't of great value, or that it's useless in a leader - if the next leader is fluent in one of these languages (or any other language, for that matter!) all the better. My point is that knowledge of Cantonese or Mandarin is not interchangeable with knowledge of French. The next leader of the NDP is unlikely to be doing a televised debate in Mandarin or Cantonese. They are unlikely to be spending about a quarter or more of their time in ridings where the majority of the people speak Mandarin or Cantonese. They are unlikely to do at least a quarter of their media interviews in Mandarin or Cantonese. But I guarantee you they WILL be doing these things in French.

Quote:
 I disagree with the idea that they have to be fluently bilingual to even apply for the job. 

Back in 2003 it wouldn't have been required - but when we're the official opposition and the majority of our caucus represent predominantly Francophone ridings, I don't think it's really fair not to require bilingualism. 

Quote:
 Fluently bilingual is a very high standard. 

Fluency is subjective, and exists on a continuum that's never stable; you don't use a language in a while, it gets rusty. Are people asking that a candidate be able to write a doctoral dissertation in French? I don't think so. But I think it is a reasonable expectation that they speak French well enough to be understood with relative ease, and that they commit to working at it and improving. I'm not suggesting they can't have an accent (Jack had an accent - and actually, everyone has an accent of some kind from somewhere, if not a hodge-podge of features from different settings). But it is perfectly reasonable to expect the next prime minister to be able to communicate with at least 80% of the country's inhabitants. 

 

robbie_dee

Convention Saturday March 24 in Toronto. Leadership entry fee $15,000 with a spending limit of $500,000.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ndp-sets-500000-spending-li...

meades meades's picture

Jesus, I nearly had a heart attack: That's a $15,000 entry fee, and a $500,000 spending limit.

Life, the unive...

Why a heart attack?  That is actually a very low entry fee and a pretty low spending limit for a  party that is the official opposition.  If you can't raise $15,000, which is a very small amount in politicals terms, you are not a serious candidate.

Policywonk

meades wrote:

No one is suggesting otherwise. But let's look at the reality of the NDP leadership: The only MP that is bilingual in a set of languages other than English and French is Olivia Chow...


You've got to be kidding. There must be close to a half dozen NDP MPs that are bilingual in other than English and French in Quebec alone! Some are quadralingual.

Policywonk

Life, the universe, everything wrote:

Why a heart attack?  That is actually a very low entry fee and a pretty low spending limit for a  party that is the official opposition.  If you can't raise $15,000, which is a very small amount in politicals terms, you are not a serious candidate.

I think they thought the entry fee was $500,000 on first glance.

meades meades's picture

Quote:
You've got to be kidding. There must be close to a half dozen NDP MPs that are bilingual in other than English and French in Quebec alone! Some are quadralingual.

 I edited my statement to read "The only MP as far as I know that is bi/multilingual in a set of languages that does not include English and French is...". But I should have also mentioned that I was talking about MPs that have been touted as leadership candidates. Peggy Nash speaks Spanish in addition to being fluent in English & French, and Romeo Saganash speaks Cree and Anishinaabemowin, but of course also speaks both English & French as well.

Quote:
Why a heart attack?  That is actually a very low entry fee and a pretty low spending limit.

The original reference to the article stated the entry fee was $500,000, and my post was pointing out the typo.

robbie_dee

Yes my mistake, hope your heart's ok now meades.

josh

robbie_dee wrote:

Convention Saturday March 24 in Toronto. Leadership entry fee $15,000 with a spending limit of $500,000.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ndp-sets-500000-spending-li...

So, no union set aside according to this article?

Policywonk

josh wrote:

robbie_dee wrote:

Convention Saturday March 24 in Toronto. Leadership entry fee $15,000 with a spending limit of $500,000.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ndp-sets-500000-spending-li...

So, no union set aside according to this article?

No. The Constitution has been interpreted so that the change in 2006 does not allow it.

meades meades's picture

It's interesting - I wonder what a OMOV leadership convention will look like when it's not combined with a policy convention? I guess there won't be delegates, just whoever wants to go? It hadn't even crossed my mind that they would split the leadership and policy conventions, but of course we just had a policy convention, so it makes sense. 

Policywonk

meades wrote:

It's interesting - I wonder what a OMOV leadership convention will look like when it's not combined with a policy convention? I guess there won't be delegates, just whoever wants to go? It hadn't even crossed my mind that they would split the leadership and policy conventions, but of course we just had a policy convention, so it makes sense. 

BC NDP had a Leadership "convention" this year in Vancouver with local gatherings where the proceedings could be watched live. Telephone and internet voting could be done from anywhere either that day or in advance, but some people did it at the local gatherings, and presumably at the central gathering.

Stockholm

I assume that there will be some sort of a evening long tribute to Jack, speeches by the candidates, a lot of socializing and partying and then the announcement of the results!

Policywonk

Apparently Charlie Angus has said he will not run.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2011/09/09/pol-ndp-federal-council...

Just before the picture of Olivia.

Sara Mayo

It's a disapointment to hear Charlie Angus won't run - he would have been a worthy candidate, although his French would have been an issue.

The CBC story also mentions that the leadership event will be at Exibition Place in Toronto. Personally, I will be haunting to be in the same room where we elected Jack in 2003... But hopefully the same great energy that we filled it with will return to the room!

ravenj

Could I ask for a bit of crowd-sourcing: to which email addresses can individual candidates be contacted?  They must need regional volunteers right?

Malcolm Malcolm's picture

Policywonk wrote:

meades wrote:

No one is suggesting otherwise. But let's look at the reality of the NDP leadership: The only MP that is bilingual in a set of languages other than English and French is Olivia Chow...


You've got to be kidding. There must be close to a half dozen NDP MPs that are bilingual in other than English and French in Quebec alone! Some are quadralingual.

Niki Ashton is multilingual, with fluent English, French, Spanish and Greek, as well as some Mandarin, Russian, Ukrainian and Turkish. I understand she is functional though not fluent in Cree and Michif.

dacckon dacckon's picture

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSBPs7I6I_I

 

A progressive who's charismatic and pragmatic.

 

No big signs he will run through

 

Edit(part 2): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbztCy_7voU&feature=related
(part 3) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFssYGITQhw&feature=related

Wilf Day

A somewhat dated run-down on potential candidates in the Quebec media:

Quote:
Thomas Mulcair, bien connu auprès de la population québécoise, a confirmé y réfléchir sérieusement, de même que la députée de Gatineau, Françoise Boivin.

Par ailleurs, en entrevue à La Presse Canadienne, le député de Rosemont-La-Petite-Patrie, Alexandre Boulerice, a noté avoir reçu de nombreux appels de militants l'incitant à tenter sa chance. Il n'a pas fermé la porte et songe à une éventuelle candidature.

Guy Caron n'a pour sa part pas voulu répondre à la question sur son intérêt à se lancer lui-même dans la course. Enfin, un autre candidat pressenti, le Cri Roméo Saganash, doit prendre la parole à Montréal vendredi et pourrait alors annoncer ses intentions.

Les Québécois qui prendront leur place sur la ligne de départ devront faire le plein d'appuis s'ils espèrent arriver victorieux au fil d'arrivée, puisque des candidats provenant d'autres provinces leur livreront assurément une chaude lutte. Le respecté président du parti, Brian Topp, envisage de se lancer, de même que Megan Leslie et Robert Chisholm, tous deux de la Nouvelle-Écosse. Peter Julian, issu de la Colombie-Britannique et parfaitement bilingue, est également vu comme un candidat qui pourrait l'emporter.

http://www.branchez-vous.com/info/actualite/2011/08/leadershiples_quebec...

Sine Ziegler

Tom Vouloumanos wrote:

 

Pierre Ducasse Ponders NDP Leadership: Once A Future Star, Quebecer Weighs Family, New Job 

 

 

#mce_temp_url#

 

Thanks Tom. Nice to see a bunch of oldies on here. Hi Meades and Robbie Dee. 

 

It's unfortunate that Pierre missed out as a candidate in Quebec, and will be likely missing out on this leadership race, but I completely understand his choice in being with his young child. Hopefully there will be more Pierre later on. Political timing is kind to some, and not to others. We know this with Jack too...

Sine Ziegler

At this point it seems like there will be too many candidates to chose from! I suppose that is the problem with a large caucus.

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