NDP Leadership Thread - Part 6

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MegB
NDP Leadership Thread - Part 6

Continued from here.

Lou Arab Lou Arab's picture

It seems the theme of the day is to not rush the leadership race.  I am open to having my mind changed on this, but I'm feeling a bit contrairian about the issue.

The current leadership vaccum makes me nervous.  There are all kinds of pitfalls we can get trapped into without a strong sense of direction.  The recent media mischef over a possible merger is just one such issue that becomes harder to manage without a permanent leader.

I think a leadership vote in early February gives the NDP a five month campaign.  We settle federal elections in five weeks, surely we can decide our leadership in five months and not longer?

I too want to see campaigns sign up members, especially in Quebec.  But I think five months gives plenty of time for some of that to happen.

And speaking as someone who may end up supporting Mulcair - he is going to have to prove he can get votes in the rest of Canada to get my vote.  So I think it's not entirely bad that he starts with a disadvantage in his home province.

Uncle John

I think it is good for the cause of democracy in general to encourage NPD membership sales in Quebec. The NDP needs more members in Quebec so they can put up a decent showing in a leadership contest. Being able to pick a leader is a compelling reason to buy a Party membership.

Life, the unive...

I really don't understand this idea that a long drawn out affiar somehow translates into more membership sales.  Speaking from a marketing stance, a limited time offer, with a deadline fast approaching is far more likely to get people to sign up than some longish affair.  It will also mean that serious contenders will have to work very hard, which could/should translate into a sense of excitment and building.  I think the latest date should be March/April, sooner being much better.   I totally fail to see how tighter timelines puts Quebec membership sales at a disadvantage.   To me it suggests better get signed up now, rather than putting it off and forgetting about it.

Aristotleded24

Lou Arab wrote:
The current leadership vaccum makes me nervous.

What leadership vaccum would that be? Let's not forget that the NDP currently has a leader, her name is Nycole Turmel, and she will do just fine in that role while we plan for the future.

Caissa

I think I am inclined to support Olivia, if she chooses to run.

Lou Arab Lou Arab's picture

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Lou Arab wrote:
The current leadership vaccum makes me nervous.

What leadership vaccum would that be? Let's not forget that the NDP currently has a leader, her name is Nycole Turmel, and she will do just fine in that role while we plan for the future.

We have an Interm Leader, which is a very different thing than a Leader.

A permanent Leader has authority and respect that comes from having run and won a nation-wide leadership contest.  A permanent Leader has powers that come from the fact he/she will be in place for awhile, not just a few months - and therefore has the ability to influence what MPs say to the public. And he/she has the ability to be something of a 'final word' on an issue, and not just say something that can be reviewed in a few months when someone else is in the chair.

Nicole Turmel can claim to speak for the NDP, but whatever she says can be reversed by the new leader. In the eyes of the caucus, the media, and perhaps even the public, this amounts to a lack of gravitas that would be helpful as our opponents throw things at us.

JeffWells

Lou Arab wrote:

Nicole Turmel can claim to speak for the NDP, but whatever she says can be reversed by the new leader. In the eyes of the caucus, the media, and perhaps even the public, this amounts to a lack of gravitas that would be helpful as our opponents throw things at us.

I don't think there's much likelihood of Turmel creating division in the caucus, but I do think the media will promote whatever angle it thinks will best depress support for the NDP. There's not much to be done about that, until we get a better media.

Whenever the convention, we'll undoubtedly have a new leader before the Liberals. Let's not forget that.

dacckon dacckon's picture

CAW head cries for merger.

 

Unions will probably get a lesser % for this in the leadership race.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I renewed my membership - does that mean I get a vote?

Le Papillon De Fer

Le Papillon De Fer

Since there is talk of Françoise Boivin possibly entering the leadership race, I thought I’d put my two cents in since she’s my MP.

I first met her in 2008 at her campaign launch during the federal election that year. I was a long-time NDP supporter and wanted to get more active in the party, so I went to her launch to meet her and see what she was like. One of her crew introduced me to her. As soon as Francoise heard my name, she said to me, “Thank you. Nice to see you here,” − in English. A few minutes later, she personally introduced me to Jack Layton, again in English. Now I don’t put much stock into the whole “Quebec hates Anglos” thing (I’ve seen way more Quebec-bashing, quite frankly), and those were admittedly small gestures, but I had just moved to Gatineau a few months before, didn’t know anyone yet and my French was marginal at best. So those “small gestures” really meant a lot to me.

During and after the election, I volunteered for her and the Gatineau NDP riding association. I was one of two Anglophones volunteering at the time, and tried to communicate in the meetings in French as best I could. She and the rest of the volunteers in the association could have said to me, “Sorry but you French isn’t up to snuff,” and throw me out, but nope, she would explain what I wouldn’t understand in English and was very patient. The fact that I was an Anglophone with only a functional level of French (which has since improved greatly) was irrelevant to her.

The reason I’m bringing this up is that people are saying that she isn’t that well-known outside of Quebec, which I do concede is true. But I hope that what I’ve said would convince NDP supporters living outside the province that they can trust her and that they can be included. She’s also a committed federalist (I’d like the see the Conservatives and their media pull a Nycole Turmel. This is a woman who is dead set on voting QS, let alone any other sovereigntist party. I certainly wouldn’t screw with her). She’s got a lot of federal government experience, both as a Liberal and NDPer, which might convince those Liberal voters who are thinking about switching to the NDP. Even as a Liberal, she was quite left on a lot of issues, so I don’t think she’s Third Way at all. Most of all she, along with Mulcair and Layton, were absolutely instrument in bringing about the orange crush in Quebec votes for the NDP.

That said, if somebody else proves to be a better candidate for leadership than her, so be it. I’m willing to listen to everybody who runs. I even have my own dream list of candidates, which I’ll put in another post as this is long enough as it is. I just though that, since she is my MP, I needed to toot her horn, so to speak.

Policywonk

Life, the universe, everything wrote:

I really don't understand this idea that a long drawn out affiar somehow translates into more membership sales.  Speaking from a marketing stance, a limited time offer, with a deadline fast approaching is far more likely to get people to sign up than some longish affair.  It will also mean that serious contenders will have to work very hard, which could/should translate into a sense of excitment and building.  I think the latest date should be March/April, sooner being much better.   I totally fail to see how tighter timelines puts Quebec membership sales at a disadvantage.   To me it suggests better get signed up now, rather than putting it off and forgetting about it.

It helps if there is a more developed organization in order to solicit these memberships, and it is to some extent a chicken and egg thing I think. I was stuck by Caplan's interpretation of similar timelines to the 2003 Leadership race; I hadn't thought of it that way. If there is to be a Leadership Convention/gathering to coincide with the Leadership election, April is not the best time for University students. Maybe March would be a good compromise, but when might the Conservatives bring down a budget?

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Le Papillon De Fer wrote:

This is a woman who is dead set on voting QS, let alone any other sovereigntist party.

By which, of course, you mean "dead set against".

God forbid the NDP should tolerate a leader who supports a provincial socialist party in Quebec, like that nasty traitor Turmel!

vermonster

M. Spector wrote:

Le Papillon De Fer wrote:

This is a woman who is dead set on voting QS, let alone any other sovereigntist party.

By which, of course, you mean "dead set against".

God forbid the NDP should tolerate a leader who supports a provincial socialist party in Quebec, like that nasty traitor Turmel!

 

I vote and belong to the QS, so I'm not about to criticise Turmel for it in any way.

But because the QS supports independence (in some form, and not as the top priority of the party), I understand the reasons that membership is problematic for a federal party leader. And while most of the members and activists of QS are socialists, the party's declaration of principles does not specifically endorse socialism.

It is a reflection of the complications of left wing politics in Quebec, where the intersection of the national question and socialism/social democracy means that people have to deal with the contradictions - many left federalists have voted for separatist parties (QS, BQ, PQ, UFP, PDS, RAP, etc...) and many sovereignists have voted for federalist parties (especially the NDP in 2011, but also smaller socialist parties and the Greens).

Unfortunately, these nuances really don't translate well outside Quebec, and as a result, belonging to a sovereignist party is probably a disqualifier for a federal leader.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

vermonster wrote:

Unfortunately, these nuances really don't translate well outside Quebec, and as a result, belonging to a sovereignist party is probably a disqualifier for a federal leader.

I'm sure you meant "...having once belonged to a sovereignist party" since once in the NDP you can not belong to another political party - the form I signed at my renewal said so.

Le Papillon De Fer

To M. Spector:
Ok, first of all, sorry for the grammatical error. I'm brand new here and I was trying to post this several times to no avail as I’m not very familiar with HTML. I do want to make clear though (and perhaps this was my fault as I wasn't specific enough) that the reason she chose to not vote QS was NOT because of its socialist ideals. I repeat NOT because of its socialist ideals. It was because of the fact that she disagreed with it being sovereigntist, even if it was a means to an end like what QS party policy says.
As well, I can confidently say that Ms. Boivin would not see Ms. Turmel as a “traitor”, as you are accusing her of doing. I do not see her as one for that matter. Don’t put words into either of our mouths. The reason why so many people who are NDP or otherwise vote QS in the first place is not because they are sovereigntist, but because QS is seen to be (including by me) the only truly left-wing party left in a sea of right-wing politics in Quebec. It was the same reason why so many people voted Bloc for so long federally in Quebec pre-orange crush. Both are more complex than simple sovereignty, which Ms. Boivin would understand. The issue of the NDP and QS is something that needs to be talked about constructively.
I came on this board because it has given great insight on the leadership debate and I wanted to participate. But if this is how I’m going to be treated, you’ve got one rabble-rouser less.

bekayne
M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Le Papillon De Fer wrote:

The reason why so many people who are NDP or otherwise vote QS in the first place is not because they are sovereigntist, but because QS is seen to be (including by me) the only truly left-wing party left in a sea of right-wing politics in Quebec.

I understand that. Indeed, that is why I was offended by your seeking to make a virtue out of being "dead set" against voting for QS in a Quebec provincial election.

It seems only the QS and the PQ get this "untouchable" treatment from the NDP. When it comes to members who were former cabinet ministers in the provincial Liberal government, there seems to be no such concern to rule them out as potential party leaders. I find that offensive and hypocritical.

Stockholm

I'm not sure what you mean by "untouchable", the current interim leader of the federal NDP was once a member of the BQ and QS and that didn't stop her from being named interim leader - what exactly do you mean?

JeffWells

Romeo Saganash declares his interest, says he'll make a final decision after the party decides on the rules:

 

http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20110902/romeo-saganash-ndp-leadership-...

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Saganash is a super guy - I wonder how well known he is outside this riding? Mulcair has the advantage - he's appeared nation-wide on P&P many times.

vermonster

Boom Boom wrote:

vermonster wrote:

Unfortunately, these nuances really don't translate well outside Quebec, and as a result, belonging to a sovereignist party is probably a disqualifier for a federal leader.

I'm sure you meant "...having once belonged to a sovereignist party" since once in the NDP you can not belong to another political party - the form I signed at my renewal said so.

My understanding of that rule is that you can't belong to another federal party, or to another provincial party that competes against the NDP. But since there is no provincial NDP in Quebec (or in Nunavit or the NWT), there is no conflict in joining QS. (I hope that's the case, since I belong to both the NDP and QS.)

Aristotleded24

vermonster wrote:
My understanding of that rule is that you can't belong to another federal party, or to another provincial party that competes against the NDP. But since there is no provincial NDP in Quebec (or in Nunavit or the NWT), there is no conflict in joining QS. (I hope that's the case, since I belong to both the NDP and QS.)

That's why the NDP didn't create a Quebec section a few years ago. Most of the NDP voters federally would vote for QS provincially, and with a provincial section of the NDP, the rules about supporting other parties come into play, and most would have chosen QS.

Stockholm

I think the issue here is not what is "legal" or not in terms of memberships in other parties. I think the issue is that having a permanent leader who was very recently a member of a pro-Quebec sovereignty party would be like shooting fish in a barrel for the Tories! Can you imagine the attack ads??? 

NicHull

vermonster wrote:

Boom Boom wrote:

vermonster wrote:

Unfortunately, these nuances really don't translate well outside Quebec, and as a result, belonging to a sovereignist party is probably a disqualifier for a federal leader.

I'm sure you meant "...having once belonged to a sovereignist party" since once in the NDP you can not belong to another political party - the form I signed at my renewal said so.

My understanding of that rule is that you can't belong to another federal party, or to another provincial party that competes against the NDP. But since there is no provincial NDP in Quebec (or in Nunavit or the NWT), there is no conflict in joining QS. (I hope that's the case, since I belong to both the NDP and QS.)

vermonster is right. The NDP Member Declaration specifically says "I hereby state that I am not a member nor supporter of any other federal political party, nor a member or supporter of any other provincial or territorial party where there is a provincial or territorial NDP."

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Okay, that settles it. I can join QS without compromising my NDP federal membership. Smile

vermonster

Karl Belanger's name is being floated.

Glen McGregor at the Ottawa Citizen is citing unnamed party sources (of course) saying that he is being urged to run.

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/life/Layton%2Bformer%2Bpress%2Bsecretary%2B...

A young bilingual Francophone from Quebec who has been around the political track for a while is an intriguing twist (as opposed to the Anglophone Quebecers Mulcair and Topp being pushed).

While I have been impressed with the work he did with Jack, I really don't know what I think of him as a potential leadership candidate. His entire political identity is wrapped up in his role with Layton, so I have no idea what his political beliefs or capabilities on his own really are. (I've run into him over the years at party events, but don't know him in the least, at least not enough to have an opinion.)

Would he bring anything to the race? Is he leadership material?

 

genstrike

Is it just me, or is it solely the ridiculous self-centred Ottawa media "Hill" culture which is promoting people like Belanger and Topp as the next NDP leader?

Howard

If the Ottawa Citizen is right about an article saying Karl Bélanger is being encouraged to run, then all I have to say is Go Canadiens go!

David Young

genstrike wrote:

Is it just me, or is it solely the ridiculous self-centred Ottawa media "Hill" culture which is promoting people like Belanger and Topp as the next NDP leader?

No, it's not just you.

The media forces that are absolutely scared of the possibility of an NDP victory in the next federal election are throwing every name they can out to the public, along with the constant bombardment of Liberal-NDP merger talk, to hopefully get Canadians to think twice next time about voting NDP (Stay with the Devils you know, people...don't go with the Devils you don't know!!!).

You need only read the Chronicle Herald here in Nova Scotia to see how one-sided their perspective is.

Get used to it, because there's going to be much more between now and Election Day 2015!

 

 

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Absolutely right, David. I hope the NDP realizes, that due to its reputation as a party of the commie Left Laughing and new Official Opposition status  it's going to have to be on full time alert against misleading articles and ready to refute as much as it can.

Aristotleded24

David Young wrote:
The media forces that are absolutely scared of the possibility of an NDP victory in the next federal election are throwing every name they can out to the public, along with the constant bombardment of Liberal-NDP merger talk, to hopefully get Canadians to think twice next time about voting NDP (Stay with the Devils you know, people...don't go with the Devils you don't know!!!).

David, how do you think a third-place finish for Liberals in Ontario and Newfoundland provincial elections this Fall would impact these "merger" discussions? For that matter, let's throw in a third place finish for the Liberals in Nova Scotia in 2013?

While I'm at it, any idea why the CAW has apparently taken the bait?

Hunky_Monkey

genstrike wrote:

Is it just me, or is it solely the ridiculous self-centred Ottawa media "Hill" culture which is promoting people like Belanger and Topp as the next NDP leader?

I see it.

I find it interesting that Topp is being touted as a frontrunner... but from every New Democrat I talk to, they're cool to the idea of his candidacy. They like Topp as a strategist but not as leader.

Even here on babble you see it. So how is he a frontrunner?

Policywonk

He doesn't support a merger with the Liberals either.

Policywonk

Aristotleded24 wrote:

vermonster wrote:
My understanding of that rule is that you can't belong to another federal party, or to another provincial party that competes against the NDP. But since there is no provincial NDP in Quebec (or in Nunavit or the NWT), there is no conflict in joining QS. (I hope that's the case, since I belong to both the NDP and QS.)

That's why the NDP didn't create a Quebec section a few years ago. Most of the NDP voters federally would vote for QS provincially, and with a provincial section of the NDP, the rules about supporting other parties come into play, and most would have chosen QS.

Not exactly. The Quebec NDP and the Federal NDP severed ties long before the creation of QS (over Meech Lake and other policy differences), but the remnants of the NPDQ morphed eventually through name changes and merger into QS.

JeffWells

Thinking positive thoughts for a moment - it'll probably pass - but isn't it amazing to consider the possible depth of the field coming out of Quebec alone? Mulcair, Saganash and Boivin, maybe more. (Caron?) What a testament to Jack's vision and legacy.

Aristotleded24

Policywonk wrote:
Aristotleded24 wrote:
vermonster wrote:
My understanding of that rule is that you can't belong to another federal party, or to another provincial party that competes against the NDP. But since there is no provincial NDP in Quebec (or in Nunavit or the NWT), there is no conflict in joining QS. (I hope that's the case, since I belong to both the NDP and QS.)

That's why the NDP didn't create a Quebec section a few years ago. Most of the NDP voters federally would vote for QS provincially, and with a provincial section of the NDP, the rules about supporting other parties come into play, and most would have chosen QS.

Not exactly. The Quebec NDP and the Federal NDP severed ties long before the creation of QS (over Meech Lake and other policy differences), but the remnants of the NPDQ morphed eventually through name changes and merger into QS.

I knew that the Federal and Quebec NDP wings had parted ways a while back. There were, however, discussions a few years ago about creating a provincial section.

Aristotleded24

JeffWells wrote:
Thinking positive thoughts for a moment - it'll probably pass - but isn't it amazing to consider the possible depth of the field coming out of Quebec alone? Mulcair, Saganash and Boivin, maybe more. (Caron?) What a testament to Jack's vision and legacy.

You forgot Brosseau!

Stockholm

vermonster wrote:

A young bilingual Francophone from Quebec who has been around the political track for a while is an intriguing twist (as opposed to the Anglophone Quebecers Mulcair and Topp being pushed).

I am actually not sure if Topp would be considered anglophone or francophone. He grew up off island in Quebec and one of his parents is French and when he speaks French he has no anglo accent whatsoever.

ottawaobserver

I think the phenomenon that keeps popping up these Hill names as potential leaders is that the gallery doesn't know its way around the party nation-wide, and just knows the people it deals with every day..

Topp is a bit different, and without even announcing, appears to have picked up the support of Dawn Black.

On the other hand, I would love to see Karl in the House of Commons.

Whoever the leader is, is going to have to deal with some pretty strong personalities in caucus, and navigate the party's way through some pretty rocky straights ahead. That's the most important qualification for us to consider, in my view. Apart from that trait, the field is still pretty wide open for me, and I want to hear a lot more from a lot more folks.

West Coast Greeny

 

Frontrunners:
Brian Topp
Age: 51
Fluently bilingual Quebec native
NDP President (2011-), NDP campaign advisor (2011), NDP National campaign director (2006, 2008), Advisor to David Miller's victorious 2003 mayoral campaign, Chief of Staff to Premier Roy Romanow (1993-2000)
Political Traits: Moderate, described as being from the "winning" camp of the NDP for his remarkable electoral record as a backroom strategist.
Writes a column for the Globe and Mail: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/second-reading/brian-topp

Thomas Mulcair
Age: 56
Fluently bilingual Quebec native
MP for Outremont, Deputy Leader of the NDP, Quebec lieutenant (2007-)
MNA for Chomedey (1994-2007), Quebec Minister of the Environment (2003-2006)
Political Traits: Moderate, highly confrontational

Second Tier:
Robert Chistholm
Age: 53
Not particularly bilingual
MP for Darmouth-Cole Harbour (2011-)
MLA for Halifax Atlantic (1991-2003), NS NDP Leader (1996-2000), NS NDP's first Leader of the Official Opposition (1998-1999)
CUPE Atlantic Regional Director (2007-2011), Board of Governors member at Dalhousie University, Founder/Owner of Simon Cristholm consulting (2009-_

Franciose Boivin
MP for Gatineau (2004-2006 as a Liberal, 2011- as a New Democrat)
Member of the Quebec Bar since 1984
Radio host on CJRC (1998-?); Prolific community activist and charity fundraiser, known for aiding women and seniors

Peggy Nash
Age: 60
Considered bilingual
MP for Parkdale-High Park (2006-2008; 2011-), Industry Critic (2006-2008), Finance Critic (2011-) 
NDP President (2009-2011)
Assistant to the President of the Canadian Autoworkers Union (1985 - 2005?)

Paul Dewar 
Age: 48
Fluently bilingual
MP for Ottawa Centre (2006-)
Former elementary school teacher, VP of the Ottawa-Carlton Elementary School Teachers Federation

Peter Julian
Age: 49
Fluently bilingual
MP for Burnaby-New Westminster (2004-), NDP critic for International Trade (2004-), held critic positions in Transport and Persons with Disabilities as well.
Former executive director with the Council of Canadians, headed opposition to the arrival of Big Box stores to New Westminster, noted fierce critic of SPP

Third tier
Pat Martin
Age: 55
??? bilingual
MP for Winnipeg Centre (1997-)
Former Journeyman carpenter, buisness manager of the Manitoba Carpenter's Union (1989-1997)
Running on a platform of a Liberal-NDP merger
Experienced professional shit disturber 

Libby Davies 
Age: 58
Strictly Anglophone
MP for Vancouver East (1997-), NDP deputy leader (2008-), NDP House leader (2011-)
Vancouver COPE councillor (1984-1992), mayoral candidate (1993)
Founded Downtown Eastside Residents Association (1973

 

ottawaobserver

You forgot Romeo Saganash, WCG.

vermonster

Stockholm wrote:

vermonster wrote:

A young bilingual Francophone from Quebec who has been around the political track for a while is an intriguing twist (as opposed to the Anglophone Quebecers Mulcair and Topp being pushed).

I am actually not sure if Topp would be considered anglophone or francophone. He grew up off island in Quebec and one of his parents is French and when he speaks French he has no anglo accent whatsoever.

You hit at something a lot of us who grew up bicultural in Quebec deal with - Anglo or Franco or something else unique?

I've always though of Brian as Anglo - he went to English CEGEP, edited the Daily at McGill, identified himself as Anglo during the 80 referendum debate, started an English language alternative paper in Montreal, and then went on to a political career in Saskatechewan and Ontario. While he is extremely comfortable (and completely fluent) in French, my sense of Brian is that he has primarily functioned in an Anglo social and work environment (but, in all fairness, my personal acquaintance with him pretty much ended in the mid-1980s when I left Montreal and started working overseas - but up until that point, he largely ran in English social and work circles).

But, just like Mulcair, my sense is that Topp is functionally bicultural in addition to being bilingual. And that speaks to a strength that either one of them would bring to leadership in a country where the party needs to appeal to both language groups (in addition to First Nations and immigrant communities).

 

 

 

KenS

I know of someone whose name has not been mentioned and who I believe intends to announce soon after the rules are announced. Which is when probably?

ottawaobserver

Federal Council is meeting September 9th in Ottawa to decide that very thing, KenS.

Meanwhile, can you give us any hints?

Le Papillon De Fer

Let me just extend the olive branch to M.Spector and others. I meant no disrespect to anyone and i was being thin-skinned. At least this brought up a good discussion about the NDP and QS, so I'll leave it at that.

JeffWells wrote:

Thinking positive thoughts for a moment - it'll probably pass - but isn't it amazing to consider the possible depth of the field coming out of Quebec alone? Mulcair, Saganash and Boivin, maybe more. (Caron?) What a testament to Jack's vision and legacy.

It is certainly amazing that there are so many Quebecois and Quebecoise potential candidates. Jack would be so proud of that, especially by their diversity, since they are Anglophone (Topp), Francophone (Boivin, or Caron if he throws his name into the hat), bicultural (Mulcair) and even First Nations (Saganash). There's something for everybody. There seems to seem a few candidates who could appeal to the western parts of Canada as well (Julian, Topp,) who, by being bilingual, could bridge the gap between the RoC and Quebec. Not that the Quebec candidates couldn't do vice versa, as they are bilingual as well. So far though, the only potential candidate fromthe Maritimes seems to be Megan Leslie, which is curious. Is anyone else from that region making a peep?

Policywonk

Le Papillon De Fer wrote:

Let me just extend the olive branch to M.Spector and others. I meant no disrespect to anyone and i was being thin-skinned. At least this brought up a good discussion about the NDP and QS, so I'll leave it at that.

JeffWells wrote:

Thinking positive thoughts for a moment - it'll probably pass - but isn't it amazing to consider the possible depth of the field coming out of Quebec alone? Mulcair, Saganash and Boivin, maybe more. (Caron?) What a testament to Jack's vision and legacy.

It is certainly amazing that there are so many Quebecois and Quebecoise potential candidates. Jack would be so proud of that, especially by their diversity, since they are Anglophone (Topp), Francophone (Boivin, or Caron if he throws his name into the hat), bicultural (Mulcair) and even First Nations (Saganash). There's something for everybody. There seems to seem a few candidates who could appeal to the western parts of Canada as well (Julian, Topp,) who, by being bilingual, could bridge the gap between the RoC and Quebec. Not that the Quebec candidates couldn't do vice versa, as they are bilingual as well. So far though, the only potential candidate fromthe Maritimes seems to be Megan Leslie, which is curious. Is anyone else from that region making a peep?

Chisholm seems to be considering it.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2011/08/31/ns-robert-chi...

Le Papillon De Fer

West Coast Greeny wrote:

 

Frontrunners:
Brian Topp
Age: 51
Fluently bilingual Quebec native
NDP President (2011-), NDP campaign advisor (2011), NDP National campaign director (2006, 2008), Advisor to David Miller's victorious 2003 mayoral campaign, Chief of Staff to Premier Roy Romanow (1993-2000)
Political Traits: Moderate, described as being from the "winning" camp of the NDP for his remarkable electoral record as a backroom strategist.
Writes a column for the Globe and Mail: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/second-reading/brian-topp

Thomas Mulcair
Age: 56
Fluently bilingual Quebec native
MP for Outremont, Deputy Leader of the NDP, Quebec lieutenant (2007-)
MNA for Chomedey (1994-2007), Quebec Minister of the Environment (2003-2006)
Political Traits: Moderate, highly confrontational

Second Tier:
Robert Chistholm
Age: 53
Not particularly bilingual
MP for Darmouth-Cole Harbour (2011-)
MLA for Halifax Atlantic (1991-2003), NS NDP Leader (1996-2000), NS NDP's first Leader of the Official Opposition (1998-1999)
CUPE Atlantic Regional Director (2007-2011), Board of Governors member at Dalhousie University, Founder/Owner of Simon Cristholm consulting (2009-_

Franciose Boivin
MP for Gatineau (2004-2006 as a Liberal, 2011- as a New Democrat)
Member of the Quebec Bar since 1984
Radio host on CJRC (1998-?); Prolific community activist and charity fundraiser, known for aiding women and seniors

Peggy Nash
Age: 60
Considered bilingual
MP for Parkdale-High Park (2006-2008; 2011-), Industry Critic (2006-2008), Finance Critic (2011-) 
NDP President (2009-2011)
Assistant to the President of the Canadian Autoworkers Union (1985 - 2005?)

Paul Dewar 
Age: 48
Fluently bilingual
MP for Ottawa Centre (2006-)
Former elementary school teacher, VP of the Ottawa-Carlton Elementary School Teachers Federation

Peter Julian
Age: 49
Fluently bilingual
MP for Burnaby-New Westminster (2004-), NDP critic for International Trade (2004-), held critic positions in Transport and Persons with Disabilities as well.
Former executive director with the Council of Canadians, headed opposition to the arrival of Big Box stores to New Westminster, noted fierce critic of SPP

Third tier
Pat Martin
Age: 55
??? bilingual
MP for Winnipeg Centre (1997-)
Former Journeyman carpenter, buisness manager of the Manitoba Carpenter's Union (1989-1997)
Running on a platform of a Liberal-NDP merger
Experienced professional shit disturber 

Libby Davies 
Age: 58
Strictly Anglophone
MP for Vancouver East (1997-), NDP deputy leader (2008-), NDP House leader (2011-)
Vancouver COPE councillor (1984-1992), mayoral candidate (1993)
Founded Downtown Eastside Residents Association (1973

 

I would actually put Peter Julian in the First Tier, personally. Out of any other candidate who lives outside of Quebec, he has the best chance of bridging the gap between the RoC and that province. This is guy from BC who, when he decided to go to university, went to the Universite du Quebec a Montreal (UQaM) at a time when it was arguably not that popular in BC for him to do so. I don't know of any Anglophones living in Quebec who are doing that now, though I would concede that there are more Anglophone sutdents going to Francophone universities on a voluntary basis than when Julian went. I'm glad you brought up the fact that he opposed the arrival of the Big Box retailers because after Walmart closes the Joliette store and the auto body shop of the Walmart in Gatineau, people are really biased against that store and they'd be glad to hear of Julian's record.

Also, exactly how bilingual is Paul Dewar? The last I heard he was taking lessons in Frnech, but is he able to converse with the media in both official languages?

I'm intrigued by all the good praise here surrounding Romeo Saganash. I don't know if he will be elelcted leader, but after all the talk about him, I'm certainly interested in what he has to say at the convention. Big bonuses for speaking two First Nations languages as well.

I think the biggest factor for me in picking a leader besides him or her having the ability to be elected Prime Minister (otherwise why are we even bothering) and being bilingual is that they have to not only be able to withstand but truimph over the inevitable Conservative and right-wing media backlash against them. I don't want end up with the NDP equivalent of Stephane Dion and Michael Ignatieff. To me that person so far is Mulcair, but who else qualifies as far as anyone here is concerned?

Le Papillon De Fer

Policywonk wrote:

Le Papillon De Fer wrote:

Let me just extend the olive branch to M.Spector and others. I meant no disrespect to anyone and i was being thin-skinned. At least this brought up a good discussion about the NDP and QS, so I'll leave it at that.

JeffWells wrote:

Thinking positive thoughts for a moment - it'll probably pass - but isn't it amazing to consider the possible depth of the field coming out of Quebec alone? Mulcair, Saganash and Boivin, maybe more. (Caron?) What a testament to Jack's vision and legacy.

It is certainly amazing that there are so many Quebecois and Quebecoise potential candidates. Jack would be so proud of that, especially by their diversity, since they are Anglophone (Topp), Francophone (Boivin, or Caron if he throws his name into the hat), bicultural (Mulcair) and even First Nations (Saganash). There's something for everybody. There seems to seem a few candidates who could appeal to the western parts of Canada as well (Julian, Topp,) who, by being bilingual, could bridge the gap between the RoC and Quebec. Not that the Quebec candidates couldn't do vice versa, as they are bilingual as well. So far though, the only potential candidate fromthe Maritimes seems to be Megan Leslie, which is curious. Is anyone else from that region making a peep?

Chisholm seems to be considering it.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2011/08/31/ns-robert-chi...

Bugger! Sorry about that. I totally forogt he made the announcement. Apologies for said brain fart.

KenS

No hints to reciprocate.

I know Council meets 9th. But will the rules be hammered out and announced then? Or kicked off with instructions/directions to be finalized?

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