NDP Is Taking 100% Of Campaign Expense Reimbursements From Riding Associations

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Mighty Middle
NDP Is Taking 100% Of Campaign Expense Reimbursements From Riding Associations

As the federal NDP prepares to spend twice what it did in the 2019 election on the next campaign, some grassroots members say that spending is happening at their expense.

New Democrat headquarters in Ottawa is keeping 100 per cent of all Elections Canada campaign expense reimbursements — money that usually flows to candidates and benefits electoral district associations or ridings.

The decision to keep all rebates was made ahead of the 2019 election and the policy is expected to remain in place for the next campaign.

Some New Democrats say the move goes against the party's values and leaves local operations in a vulnerable financial position.

In an email statement to CBC News, NDP National Director Anne McGrath said that everyone who ran for the NDP in the last several elections agreed to send campaign reimbursements to the party before they became candidates.

(they agreed to send campaign reimbursements to the party, but DID NOT agree to 100%)

"National campaigns and the coverage the leader and the campaign get in elections benefits every candidate in every riding," McGrath wrote.

"We're proud of our 2019 campaign, and we look forward to [using] the next campaign to talk to Canadians from coast to coast to coast ... to let them know that [party leader Jagmeet Singh] and New Democrats will keep fighting for them."

Party member Barry Weisleder, the chairperson of the party's unofficial socialist caucus, calls the whole situation "a bit of a scandal" and a betrayal of the NDP's rank and file.

Weisleder said EDAs use the money to cover a range of expenses — renting office space, printing signs, hiring temporary staff.

The party's actions, he said, show that the NDP remains focused on "building up parliamentary careers" and not a working-class movement.

"We're not talking about misappropriation of funds here. We're talking about misallocation of funds," Weisleder said. 

"It shows a preoccupation with polling and with the central campaign dynamics and not with local organizing."

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/federal-ndp-finances-elections-canada-r...

JKR

What do the other parties do?

Pondering

The NDP isn't supposed to be like the other parties. That is the point being made. The NDP is supposed to be a grassroots party.

My fear for the NDP is that as the Conservatives decline and the Liberals become more right wing the NDP will become more centrist and much closer to what the Liberals are now. I thought Singh was a pivot to the left but my feeling is that the party is ruled by the executive, not by elected MPs and certainly not by the grassroots.

cco

For Singh to be a pivot to the left he would have to have positions. Nothing has convinced me that he has any. He is a brand: shiny centrism sold by a visible minority, using slogans about "daring" and "courage" in the place of policies that are actually daring or courageous. He's the result of Anne McGrath and Hill and Knowlton's attempt to beat Trudeau at his own game. And since it's clear that he's not going to step down voluntarily no matter how many seats he loses and the party is about to debate a motion today that would give the executive the right to postpone conventions indefinitely, today's leadership review might be the last gasp of any semblance of party democracy.

Mighty Middle

JKR wrote:

What do the other parties do?

During the 2015 election, the NDP and Liberals transferred only 40 per cent of the rebates back to the candidates. The Liberal Party tells CBC News it still retains 60 per cent of the refunds (transfering 40 per cent, keping the 2015 policy).  In 2019, NDP HQ increased the share of rebates it kept from 60 to 100 per cent.

The Conservatives say that candidates are allowed to keep all of their refunds, fulfilling a promise party leader Erin O'Toole made during the leadership campaign.

The Green Party says it does not keep any portion of the rebates.

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

cco wrote:
For Singh to be a pivot to the left he would have to have positions. Nothing has convinced me that he has any. He is a brand: shiny centrism sold by a visible minority, using slogans about "daring" and "courage" in the place of policies that are actually daring or courageous. He's the result of Anne McGrath and Hill and Knowlton's attempt to beat Trudeau at his own game. And since it's clear that he's not going to step down voluntarily no matter how many seats he loses and the party is about to debate a motion today that would give the executive the right to postpone conventions indefinitely, today's leadership review might be the last gasp of any semblance of party democracy.

Sad but true. I intend to continue supporting my local NDP MP, Matthew Green, but I'm quite disinclined to give any form of support, financial or otherwise, to the federal party.

kropotkin1951

Michael Moriarity wrote:

cco wrote:
For Singh to be a pivot to the left he would have to have positions. Nothing has convinced me that he has any. He is a brand: shiny centrism sold by a visible minority, using slogans about "daring" and "courage" in the place of policies that are actually daring or courageous. He's the result of Anne McGrath and Hill and Knowlton's attempt to beat Trudeau at his own game. And since it's clear that he's not going to step down voluntarily no matter how many seats he loses and the party is about to debate a motion today that would give the executive the right to postpone conventions indefinitely, today's leadership review might be the last gasp of any semblance of party democracy.

Sad but true. I intend to continue supporting my local NDP MP, Matthew Green, but I'm quite disinclined to give any form of support, financial or otherwise, to the federal party.

The reason why the NDP still exists is they have always fielded and elected a few extremely dedicated left wing MP's who work hard on the right issues. My MP Gord Johns is another example however I make sure I donate to his campaign during the window when the local riding gets the funds and as little as possible goes to the central office. I found it depressing to hear that he voted to condemn China based on regime change propaganda that was  debunked prior to the Common's committee meetings.

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

cco wrote:
For Singh to be a pivot to the left he would have to have positions. Nothing has convinced me that he has any. He is a brand: shiny centrism sold by a visible minority, using slogans about "daring" and "courage" in the place of policies that are actually daring or courageous. He's the result of Anne McGrath and Hill and Knowlton's attempt to beat Trudeau at his own game. And since it's clear that he's not going to step down voluntarily no matter how many seats he loses and the party is about to debate a motion today that would give the executive the right to postpone conventions indefinitely, today's leadership review might be the last gasp of any semblance of party democracy.

Three factors contributed to Singh's win in the 2017 NDP leadership race:
1) The mainstream media and party brass anointing Singh as the "only" possible choice, before he'd even declared his intention to run for the leadership.
2) NDP members wanting to "send a message" in the wake of Trump's racist Muslim ban.
3) Mass signups of new South Asian NDP members in communities such as Brampton and Surrey.

kropotkin1951

Left Turn wrote:

Three factors contributed to Singh's win in the 2017 NDP leadership race:
1) The mainstream media and party brass anointing Singh as the "only" possible choice, before he'd even declared his intention to run for the leadership.
2) NDP members wanting to "send a message" in the wake of Trump's racist Muslim ban.
3) Mass signups of new South Asian NDP members in communities such as Brampton and Surrey.

Number three was the main reason Ujjal Dosanjh became Premier of BC. I went to the convention and voted for Corky Evans. For a little nostalgia I am posting his campaign song, by one of Canada's great singer song writers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rgx_fVAkuiw&list=PL_okj8qyFT9smlgOEtqb-B...